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    • Washington, George
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
    • Jefferson, Thomas
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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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Information from our Bankers in Holland that they had money in hand sufft to answer the demands for the Foreign Officers & Captives: and moreover that the residue of the Bonds of the last loan were engaged. The Sum necessary for the first is 60,393 ⅌ —17s.—10d. a year—and 26,000 ⅌ was sent him to complete the business of the Medals. The officers was paid up to the first of the year 1789....
In the selection of characters to fill the important offices of Government in the United States I was naturally led to contemplate the talents and disposition which I knew you to possess and entertain for the Service of your Country. And without being able to consult your inclination, or to derive any knowledge of your intentions from your letters either to myself or to any other of your...
In the selection of Characters to fill the important offices of Government in the United States I was naturally led to contemplate the talents and disposition which I knew you to possess and entertain for the Service of your Country.—And without being able to consult your inclination, or to derive any knowledge of your intentions from your letters either to myself or to any other of your...
You will perceive by the enclosed letter (which was left for you at the Office of Foreign Affairs when I made a journey to the Eastern States) the motives on which I acted with regard to yourself, and the occasion of my explaining them at that early period. Having now reason to hope—from Mr Trumbulls report—that you will be arrived at Norfolk before this time (on which event I would most...
You will perceive by the enclosed letter (which was left for you at the Office of Foreign Affairs when I made a journey to the Eastern States) the motives on which I acted with regard to yourself, and the occasion of my explaining them at that early period. Having now reason to hope from Mr. Trumbulls report that you will be arrived at Norfolk before this time (on which event I would most...
I had the pleasure to receive duly your letter dated the 15th of Decr last; but I thought proper to delay answering or mentioning the contents of it, until after the arrival of Mr Madison, who I understood had been with you. He arrived yesterday, and I now take the earliest opportunity of mentioning to you the result of my reflections; and the expediency of your deciding, at as early a period...
I had the pleasure to receive duly your letter dated the 15th. of Decr. last; but I thought proper to delay answering or mentioning the contents of it, until after the arrival of Mr. Madison, who I understood had been with you.—He arrived yesterday, and I now take the earliest opportunity of mentioning to you the result of my reflections; and the expediency of your deciding, at as early a...
The enclosed Letters & documents from Mr Gouvr Morris are sent for the perusal of the Secretary of State. The private letters from the Marquis de la Fayette and Mr Payne he also gives Mr Jefferson a sight of; because there are some ideas in the latter which are new—and in the former, geneneral information respecting the affairs of France, which, by being compar’d with other accts may (though...
The enclosed Letters and documents from Mr. Gouvr. Morris are sent for the perusal of the Secretary of State. The private letters from the Marquis de la Fayette and Mr. Payne he also gives Mr. Jefferson a sight of; because there are some ideas in the latter which are new, and in the former, general information respecting the Affairs of France, which, by being compar’d with other Accounts may...
Have you formed an opinion on the subject I submitted to you on Tuesday?—Have you heard whether the Bill was disputed in both or either House of Congress on the ground of the Constitution, or whe[ther] this objection (in its full force) was held in petto for the last move, in the present stage of the business?—If it was debated, as above, whether the Arguments adduced by the Author of the...