George Washington Papers
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From George Washington to John Hancock, 23 July 1776

To John Hancock

New York July the 23. 1776

Sir

I was honoured with your favor of the 20th by Yesterdays post, since which and my Letter, nothing of moment has occurred.

The Ships mentioned in my Letter of the 21st to have been in the Offing, got in that day, and are supposed to be part of the Scotch fleet, having landed some Highlanders Yesterday.

Inclosed I have the honor to Transmit you Copies of a Letter, and Sundry Resolutions which I received last night from the Convention of this State. They will inform you of the computed number of Inhabitants and Stock upon Nassau Island, and their Sentiments on the Impracticability of removing the latter and also of the measures they think necessary and likely to secure them.1

I have also Inclosed a Letter from Mr Faesh to Lord Stirling upon the Subject of a Cannon Furnace for the use of the States. Congress will see his plan and proposals and determine upon them as they shall judge proper.2 I am Sir with every Sentiment of respect Yr Most Obedt Servt

Go: Washington

LS, in Robert Hanson Harrison’s writing, DNA:PCC, item 152; LB, DLC:GW; copy, DNA:PCC, item 169; Varick transcript, DLC:GW. Congress read this letter on 24 July and referred it to the Board of War (JCC description begins Worthington Chauncey Ford et al., eds. Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789. 34 vols. Washington, D.C., 1904–37. description ends , 5:608).

2The enclosed letter to Lord Stirling from John Jacob Faesh (Faesch; 1729–1799), proprietor of the ironworks at Mount Hope, N.J., has not been identified. Congress on 24 July referred the letter to a committee appointed to contract for casting cannon (JCC description begins Worthington Chauncey Ford et al., eds. Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789. 34 vols. Washington, D.C., 1904–37. description ends , 5:608) but apparently took no further action. A Swiss immigrant who had come to America in 1764, Faesh supplied the Continental army with much-needed cannon, shot, and general ironwork during the war. He became a prominent citizen of Morristown, and in 1787 he was one of the three Morris County delegates to the state convention that ratified the U.S. Constitution.

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