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§ From George Washington. Ca. 1789–1796. Three notes requesting consultation with JM on unspecified matters: “Thursday, 9 oclk. “If you could make it convenient to call here before you go to the House, you would oblige me. I want to have some conversation with you on two or three matters. Yrs Affectly.” “Sunday ½ past 7 oclk. “If you have leisure to give the enclosed a reading, and me an...
AD , DLC:GW . For background to this document, see Farm Reports, 6–12 Dec. 1789, source note . A balk is a ridge or strip of ground left unplowed as a boundary between two furrows. Root of scarcity ( Beta vulgaris or mangel-wurzel) is a coarse beet grown primarily as cattle fodder. For additional information on GW’s cultivation of this plant, see Diaries Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig, eds....
Extracted from the Report of the Proceedings of the Commissioners, appointed to Treat with the Southern Indians. Cherokees In a talk sent by Bennet Bellew & Nohtowaky on the 13th of Septr from Savannah, the Cherokees were informed by the Commissioners, that the peculiar circumstances of No. Carolina, with respect to the Union, prevented a full communication of Sentiments at that time; but that...
The President of the United States presents his Compliments to Mr Jay, and informs him that the Harness of the President’s Carriage was so much injured in coming from Jersey that he will not be able to use it today. If Mr Jay should propose going to Church this Morng the President would be obliged to him for a Seat in his Carriage. L , in the writing of David Humphreys, NNC .
While I request you to accept my thanks for your kind address, I must profess myself highly gratified by the sentiments of esteem and consideration contained in it. The approbation my past conduct has received from so worthy a body of citizens as that whose joy for my appointmt you announce, is a proof of the indulgence with which my future transactions will be judged by them. I could not...
In the fragments of the discarded inaugural address , printed below , page numbers without brackets appear on the fragment; those page numbers enclosed in brackets are conjectural. [1] We are this day assembled on a solemn and important occasion—[owned (1974) by Mr. Nathaniel E. Stein, New York] [1–3] not as a ceremony without meaning, but with a single reference to our dependence [recto,...
Among the vicissitudes incident to life, no event could have filled me with greater anxieties than that of which the notification was transmitted by your order, and received on the fourteenth day of the present month. On the one hand, I was summoned by my Country, whose voice I can never hear but with veneration and love, from a retreat which I had chosen with the fondest predilection, and, in...
I request that you will accept my best acknowledgments for your congratulation on my appointment to the first office in the nation. The kind manner in which you mention my past conduct equally claims the expression of my gratitude. After we had, by the smiles of Heaven on our exertions, obtained the object for which we contended, I retired at the conclusion of the war, with an idea that my...
Desirous of being more particular in expressing my acknowledgments for the elegant Barge which was presented to me on my arrival in this City, than I could be at that moment; I must now request that you will be pleased to offer my best thanks to the Gentlemen who were Owners of it, and assure them in my name that I consider myself much honored by their polite attention. I am, Sir, Your Most...
I can only acknowledge with thankfulness the receipt of your repeated favors —were I Master of my own time, nothing could give me greater pleasure than to have frequent occasions of assuring you, more at large, with how great esteem and consideration, I am dear Madam, Your most obedient and most humble Servant LB , DLC:GW . Annis Stockton sent one of her poems to GW on 1 May 1789 .
I feel myself much indebted to you for the congratulatory letter you forwarded to me by Genl Jackson, and for the favour you did me in bringing me acquainted with that Gentleman. Your reflections on the arduous nature of the Station in which I am placed correspond exactly with my own. If the Crisis has demanded my services, I hope the countenance of my fellow Citizens will assist me in...
I beg you to accept my unfeigned thanks for your friendly communications of this date—and that you will permit me to entreat a continuation of them as occasions may arise. The manner chosen for doing it, is most agreeable to me. It is my wish to act right; if I err; the head & not the heart, shall, with justice , be chargeable. With sentiments of sincere esteem & regard I am Dear Sir   Your...
I beg you to accept my unfeigned thanks for your friendly communications of this date—and that you will permit me to entreat a continuation of them as occasions may arise. The manner chosen for doing it, is most agreeable to me. It is my wish to act right; if I err, the head & not the heart, shall, with justice, be chargeable. With sentiments of sincere esteem & regard I am Dear Sir Your Obedt...
Notwithstanding the conviction I am under of the labour which is imposed upon you by Public Individuals as well as public bodies—yet, as you have begun, so I could wish you to finish, the good work in a short reply to the Address of the House of Representatives (which I now enclose) that there may be an accordance in this business. Thursday 12 Oclock, I have appointed to receive the Address....
I cannot fail of being much pleased with the friendly part you take in every thing which concerns me; and particularly with the just scale on which you estimate this last great sacrafice which I consider myself ⟨as having⟩ made for the good of my Country. ⟨When I ha⟩d judged⟨, u⟩pon the best appreciation I was ab⟨le to form⟩ of the circumstances which related ⟨to my-⟩self, ⟨that⟩ it was my...
Notwithstanding the conviction I am under of the labour which is imposed upon you by Public Individuals as well as public bodies—Yet, as you have began, so I would wish you to finish, the good work in a short reply to the Address of the House of Representatives (which I now enclose) that there may be an accordance in this business. Thursday 12 O’clock, I have appointed to receive the Address....
I have duly received your letter of the 30th of April, containing the resignation of your seat at the general Board of Commissioners for finally adjusting all accounts between the United States and the individual States; and shall cause it to be filed in the proper office as soon as the necessary arrangemt of departments shall have been made. I am, with great esteem, Sir, Your most Obedt Servt...
The new and busy scenes in which I have been occupied since I received your favor of the 6th of last month, containing an extract of a letter from your son, will plead my excuse for not having acknowledged the receipt of it at an earlier day. I have now to express my satisfaction for this mark of your attention, and to thank you for the interest you take in the honor which has lately been done...
Your very affectionate Address produces emotions which I know not how to express. I feel that my past endeavours in the Service of Country are far overpaid by its goodness: and I fear much that my future ones may not fulfil your kind anticipation. All that I can promise is, that they will be invariably directed by an honest and an ardent zeal. Of this resource my heart assures me. For all...
Your very affectionate Address produces emotions which I know not how to express. I feel that my past endeavors in the service of my Country are far Overpaid by its goodness: and I fear much that my future ones may not fulfill your kind Anticipation. All that I can promise is, that they will be invariably directed by an honest and an ardent zeal. Of this resource my heart assures me. For all...
Since my arrival in this place I have been honored with your letters of the 18th of Feby and 24th of April. To meet the congratulations and assurances of support from those Characters whose opinions I revere, will be of no small service in enabling me to overcome the diffidence which I have in my own abilities, to execute properly the important and untried task which my Country has assigned...
I have received your letter of the 10th of march, and must beg you to be assured that your good wishes and kind gratulations were very pleasing to me, and have my warmest acknowledgments. I shall feel a degree of confidence in the execution of my office in proportion to the assurances of support which I receive from respectable and worthy Characters in every part of the Union. I beleive I need...
I am taking the earliest occasion of acknowledging the receipt of the letter, which you did me the favor to address to me by Mr Allen; and to thank you for your kind congratulations on my appointment to the Presidency of the United States. Mrs Washington is not here, but is expected in the course of this month; on her arrival I shall not fail of executing the friendly Commission of Mrs Hancock...
The numerous congratulations which I have received from Public Bodies & respectable individuals since my appointment to my present station, are truly grateful, as they hold forth the strongest assurances of support to the Government as well as a warm attachment to myself. It is from the good dispositions of the people at large—from the influence of respectable characters—and from the patriotic...
The enclosed papers relative to a treaty with the Cherokee Indians were put into my hands: and as I understand that matters of this kind have hitherto been considered as belonging to the department of the Secretary of War to examine and report thereon, and knowing that you have others of a similar nature now in your hands, I would wish you to make a summary report on the whole as soon as may...
The affectionate address presented by the Magistrates and the general joy testified by the Citizens of New York, on my arrival in this Metropolis, have filled my mind with the mingled emotions of gratitude and satisfaction. In accepting the momentuous trust which has been spontaneously committed to me by a free people; it was not enough to have felt a consciousness of having acted in...
I yesterday had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 2d instt—and must beg you to accept of my most grateful acknowledgments for your good wishes and kind gratulations upon my entrance on a new and arduous task. It is only from the assurances of support which I have received from the respectable & worthy characters in every part of the Union, that I am enabled to overcome the diffidence...
The President of the United States wishes to avail himself of your sentiments on the following points. 1st Whether a line of conduct, equally distant from an association with all kinds of company on the one hand and from a total seclusion from Society on the other, ought to be adopted by him? and, in that case, how is it to be done? 2d What will be the least exceptionable method of bringing...
If a white horse, which your Servant was on the day I travelled with you from Bladensburg to Baltimore, has recovered of his lameness, and you have no particular predilection for him, I should be glad, as he is so good a match for the one I had of Mr Prescott, if you would sell him to, or swap him with me. Mrs Washington, with a nephew of mine (Mr Lewis) will, I expect be in Bladensburg on the...
A few days ago I was conversing with you on the points contained in the enclosed queries, when a Gentleman coming in put an end to the conversation. As it is my earnest wish to adopt such a line of conduct as shall be judged most likely to secure essentials without being exposed more than is unavoidable to the charge of too much reserve on the one hand, or too much familiarity on the other, I...
The enclosed were communicated to me, as you will perceive, to make a confidential use of—upon receipt of the first letter, I expressed a desire to be informed (if there was nothing improper in it) through what channel the report came, and what reliance could be placed in the authenticity of it—This gave rise to the second letter —As you are upon business which requires every information of...
The enclosed were communicated to me (as you will perceive) to make a Confidential use of. Upon receipt of the first letter I expressed a desire to be informed (if there was nothing improper in it) through what channel the report came, and what reliance could be placed in the authenticity of it. This produced the sec’d letter. As you are upon business which requires every information of the...
To draw such a line for the conduct of the President as will please every body, I know is impossible; but to mark out and follow one (which by being consonant with reason) will meet general approbation, may be as practicable as it is desireable. The true medium I conceive must lye in pursuing such a course as will allow him time for all the official duties of his station—This should be the...
To draw such a line for the conduct of the President as will please every body, I know is impossible; but to mark out and follow one (which by being consonant with reason) will meet general approbation, may be as practicable as it is desireable. The true medium I conceive must lye in pursuing such a course as will allow him time for all the official duties of his station. This should be the...
Your letter of the 26th of April was handed to me but a few days ago. Your congratulations and the good wishes of yourself, Mrs Fitzhugh & your family deserve, & receive my warmest acknowledgments. Amidst the numerous applications which are made for offices I shall leave no means in my power untried to gain such information & knowledge of Character & pretensions as will enable me to nominate...
I have duly received your favor of the 3 inst. dated at Mount Vernon. I am much pleased with the arrangement you have made for Mrs Washington’s coming on here with stage horses—and must beg you to accept of my best thanks for your attention and trouble in this business. The previous settlement of the price with the proprietors of the horses was a very prudent and a very necessary step—and I...
Your letter of the 21st Ulto came duly to hand, and should have received an earlier acknowledgement had not the new and busy scenes in which I have been engaged since my arrival in this place, rendered it impossible for me to pay that early attention to the favors of my friends which I should be pleased to do. The numerous and friendly congratulations which I have received from respectable...
I have received your letter of the 29th of April, and must beg you to accept of my best thanks for your kind gratulations and good wishes. I foresaw the numerous applications which would be made for nominations to offices—and readily conceived that amidst the variety of candidates, it would be one of the most delicate and difficult duties of the President, to discriminate those characters...
A letter of the 4th instant from Lt Governor Wood has been received with its inclosures, containing the information of some murders committed by the Indians on the 23d of last month at Dunkard creek which runs into the Monongahala River. It is with concern that I learn this circumstance, as a treaty has been lately concluded by the Governor of the western territory with the Wiandot, Delawar,...
The President of the United States wishes to avail himself of your sentiments on the following points— 1st Whether a line of Conduct, equally distant from an association with all kinds of Company on the one hand, and from a total seclusion from Society on the other ought to be adopted by him?—and in that case how it is to be done? 2d: What will be the least exceptionable Method of bringing any...
Mr Madison having been so obliging as to draw the answer to the address of the House of Representatives—G.W. would thank him for doing the same to that of the Senate. If he receives it any time this day or tomorrow morning it will be sufficient. AL , DLC : Madison Papers. The date of this document is conjectural. Madison docketed the letter—apparently some years after the fact—“G. Washington...
Mr. Madison having been so obliging as to draw the answer to the Address of the House of Representatives—GW. would thank him for doing the same to that of the Senate. If he receives it any time this day or tomorrow morning it will be sufficient. RC ( DLC ); Tr ( MH ). Late in life JM docketed the RC : “G. Washington without date—(perhaps 1789,) 90 or 91.” Fitzpatrick ( Writings of Washington ,...
Mrs Washington proposing to leave Mount Vernon as this day, will, I expect, be in Philadelphia on Thursday; and as she proposes to lodge at Mr Morris’s I would be obliged to you for having the enclosed letter for her lodged there against her arrival as she may find it necessary to write to me by Fridays Post. I am Dr Sir Yr most obedt Servt ALS , PWacD . Letter not found. Mrs. Washington...
I thank you for your Address, in which the most affectionate sentiments are expressed in the most obliging terms. The coincidence of circumstances which led to this auspicious Crisis, the confidence reposed in me by my Fellow-citizens, and the assistance I may expect from counsels which will be dictated by an enlarged and liberal policy, seem to presage a more prosperous issue to my...
I thank you for your Address, in which the most affectionate sentiments are expressed in the most obliging terms. The coincidence of circumstances which led to this auspicious Crisis, the confidence reposed in me by my Fellow-citizens, and the assistance I may expect from counsels which will be dictated by an enlarged and liberal policy, seem to presage a more prosperous issue to my...
However desireous I am to encourage or promote useful publications, it is not in my power to comply with the request made in your letter of the 21st ulto—to select from my papers such documents of interesting circumstances, skirmishes & battles of the Revolution, as would enable you to prosecute the design which you have begun of publishing in the American Museum a series of documents and...
Your letter of the 18th Inst, setting forth your distressed condition, and requesting some pecuniary assistance, has been put into my hands. The distresses of my fellow creatures are never known to me without giving pain, to whatever nation or Country they belong; and happy should I be could I releive the wants & necessities of every one—but, Gentlemen, that is out of my power—and there are...
I have duly received your affecting letter, dated the 8th day of this Month. Sympathysing with you, as I do, in the great misfortunes which have befallen your family in consequence of the war; my feelings, as an individual, would forcibly prompt me to do every thing in my power to repair those misfortunes. But as a public man, acting only with a reference to the public good, I must be allowed...
In addition to what I wrote to you formerly on the subject of a loan, I now inform you (and desire that this letter which conveys the information, may be destroyed as soon as read) that my utmost exertions were ineffectually used to borrow a sum of money (even at a high interest, and for me, disadvantageous terms) to comply with contracts of my own, before I left Virginia. Having made this...
I have duly received your very friendly letter of the 2d inst. and beg you to accept of my sincere acknowledgment and best thanks for the kind congratulations and good wishes which were contained in it. It affords me peculiar satisfaction to see the union of sentiment which seems to prevail in favor of our new system of Government. I find that the good and respectable characters from every...