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§ From George Washington. Ca. 1789–1796. Three notes requesting consultation with JM on unspecified matters: “Thursday, 9 oclk. “If you could make it convenient to call here before you go to the House, you would oblige me. I want to have some conversation with you on two or three matters. Yrs Affectly.” “Sunday ½ past 7 oclk. “If you have leisure to give the enclosed a reading, and me an...
AD , DLC:GW . For background to this document, see Farm Reports, 6–12 Dec. 1789, source note . A balk is a ridge or strip of ground left unplowed as a boundary between two furrows. Root of scarcity ( Beta vulgaris or mangel-wurzel) is a coarse beet grown primarily as cattle fodder. For additional information on GW’s cultivation of this plant, see Diaries Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig, eds....
Extracted from the Report of the Proceedings of the Commissioners, appointed to Treat with the Southern Indians. Cherokees In a talk sent by Bennet Bellew & Nohtowaky on the 13th of Septr from Savannah, the Cherokees were informed by the Commissioners, that the peculiar circumstances of No. Carolina, with respect to the Union, prevented a full communication of Sentiments at that time; but that...
The President of the United States presents his Compliments to Mr Jay, and informs him that the Harness of the President’s Carriage was so much injured in coming from Jersey that he will not be able to use it today. If Mr Jay should propose going to Church this Morng the President would be obliged to him for a Seat in his Carriage. L , in the writing of David Humphreys, NNC .
While I request you to accept my thanks for your kind address, I must profess myself highly gratified by the sentiments of esteem and consideration contained in it. The approbation my past conduct has received from so worthy a body of citizens as that whose joy for my appointmt you announce, is a proof of the indulgence with which my future transactions will be judged by them. I could not...
In the fragments of the discarded inaugural address , printed below , page numbers without brackets appear on the fragment; those page numbers enclosed in brackets are conjectural. [1] We are this day assembled on a solemn and important occasion—[owned (1974) by Mr. Nathaniel E. Stein, New York] [1–3] not as a ceremony without meaning, but with a single reference to our dependence [recto,...
Among the vicissitudes incident to life, no event could have filled me with greater anxieties than that of which the notification was transmitted by your order, and received on the fourteenth day of the present month. On the one hand, I was summoned by my Country, whose voice I can never hear but with veneration and love, from a retreat which I had chosen with the fondest predilection, and, in...
I request that you will accept my best acknowledgments for your congratulation on my appointment to the first office in the nation. The kind manner in which you mention my past conduct equally claims the expression of my gratitude. After we had, by the smiles of Heaven on our exertions, obtained the object for which we contended, I retired at the conclusion of the war, with an idea that my...
Desirous of being more particular in expressing my acknowledgments for the elegant Barge which was presented to me on my arrival in this City, than I could be at that moment; I must now request that you will be pleased to offer my best thanks to the Gentlemen who were Owners of it, and assure them in my name that I consider myself much honored by their polite attention. I am, Sir, Your Most...
I can only acknowledge with thankfulness the receipt of your repeated favors —were I Master of my own time, nothing could give me greater pleasure than to have frequent occasions of assuring you, more at large, with how great esteem and consideration, I am dear Madam, Your most obedient and most humble Servant LB , DLC:GW . Annis Stockton sent one of her poems to GW on 1 May 1789 .