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    • Washington, George
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Your letter of the 27th instant was received by the last Post to Alexandria. I thank you for the information contained in it; as I shall for any further communication of the sentiments of the people respecting the treaty, which you may be able to obtain, and think worthy of transmission: for, as it is an interesting subject, on which mens minds are a good deal occupied, I should like, as far...
At the conclusion of my public employments, I have thought it expedient to notice the publication of certain forged letters which first appeared in the year 1777, and were obtruded upon the public as mine. They are said by the editor to have been found in a small portmanteau that I had left in the care of my Mulatto servant named Billy, who, it is pretended, was taken prisioner at Fort Lee, in...
With much pleasure did I receive the information, contained in your letter of the 30th Ulto, of the ratification of the Treaty with Spain, by the Government of that Country. The unwelcome news of the Plague being at Algiers, is an Alloy thereto; but we must trust that Providence will prevent our unhappy fellow-citizens at that place from suffering by that malady. Much is it to be regretted...
Your two letters—both bearing date the 21st instant—with their enclosures, were received by the last Mail to Alexandria. It would have been unfortunate, and much indeed to have been regretted, if the French government had had as great cause of complaint against the conduct of the United States, as they have shewn a disposition to complain. It was natural to expect, tho’ it was not easy to...
My letters to the Secretary of the Treasury of the 4th & 6th Instant, with the present enclosure, conveys fully the sentiments of the Attorney General with respect to the best mode of executing the Act "For the relief and Protection of American Seamen". He has, since his opinion was transmitted in the above letter of the 6th, consulted two of our most eminent Lawyers, in these parts, and finds...
I had no time yesterday morning to look into the gazettes; nor did I know until the evening, that the French frigate Medusa had slipped her Cables & put to Sea on the 31st ulto; and was followed in a few hours by the Africa. This circumstance, be the result what it may, I regret exceedingly; & because the effect of the order as it relates to the British will be the same as if the Africa had...
The information contained in a letter of which the enclosed is a correct copy, (with the reservation only of names, agreeably to the request of the writer) may serve as a comment upon the conduct of the Owner of the Privateer Flying Fish; and as a developement also of the intentions of the French government so far as it relates to the Commerce of the United States with Great Britain. The...
The numerous & various reports which I have received from people who were not possessed of any accurate information with respect to the state of the malignant fever with which Philadelphia is so unfortunately afflicted, and my intention being to return thither, or to it’s neighbourhood about the first of next month, have induced me to ask this information from you—and I beg you will advise me...
Your communications of the 2d Inst. have been duly received. General Wayne will, I hope & expect, leave the Garrisons in his advanced Posts sufficiently respectable. In the present uncertainty of what may be the final result of the treaty with Great Britain, and from the intimations of Captn Brant, we ought not in my opinion to œconomise at too Great a hazard; nor build too much in the present...
Two letters from you, dated the 18th instant, were received yesterday. For the reasons you have assigned, I think it best that Mr Boudinot should fill the Directorship of the Mint; and request he may be informed so. At the same time, urge him to come forward, if for no other purpose than to arrange matters with the present occupant—and derive from him all the insight into the business his...
Not doubting but that the statements, contained in the enclosed letter to Mr Pinckney, are grounded on facts, it appears to me to be as proper as it is spirited. Transcript, MHi : Pickering Papers. The transcript was certified as “A true copy” by Octavius Pickering, 22 Feb. 1866. The transcript of Pickering’s docket reads in part: “Approves the letter to Mr Pinckney of Oct. [22] relative to...
Your letters of the 12th & 13th instant, with their enclosures, were received by Mondays Mail, the 18th. The duplicate Commission for John Trumbull; the blank Commissions for the Revenue Officers; and the Patents passed by the Attorney General; are all signed, & returned under cover with this letter. The want of funds to carry on Commerce with the Indian Tribes (agreeably to a late Act of...
Congress having closed their late session without coming to any specified determination with respect to the Georgia sale of Lands and the application for the extinguishment of the Indian rights to those Lands; and not having expressed any sentiment respecting the nature of the predatory war between the southern Indians and the southern & southwestern frontiers of these United States, and the...
I have given the draughts of the letters to Messrs Pinckney—Humphreys—and Adams an attentive perusal, and approve of their contents. It might however be better, to soften some of the strong expressions in the letter which is addressed to the first of those characters; or to convey them in Cypher, lest they should (which is not improbable) fall into hands they are not intended for. and might it...
The enclosed is approved, and if there is any Authentic ground to go upon, it ought to be extended to the case of Captn Jessup by strong & solemn expostulation or remonstrance. This conduct of G. Britain cannot, must not be suffered with impunity. ViMtvL .
As it is very desireable that the papers respecting the discontents of France should be got into Congress, and sent also to Mr Pinckney as soon as possible; if you mean to give the other Gentlemen a perusal of the Statement for the latter, it would save time if this was done as you are proceeding towards the close of that Statemt. It is questionable whether the present, and pressing avocations...
Your letter of the 3d instant, accompanying the ratified copy of the Spanish Treaty, by His Catholic Majesty, came to my hands by the last Post. The Proclamation annexed thereto, has received my Signature, and is herewith returned. NjP : DeCoppet Collection.
I have the pleasure to enclose for you the Report of the Secretary at War upon the papers which were referred to him, relative your transactions with the Seneka Indians in November last. To this satisfactory Report I am happy to add my entire Approbation of your conduct in this business—and am, With very great esteem & regard, Sir, Your most Obedt Servt LS , MHi : Timothy Pickering Papers;...
Your letter of the 11th instant was received by the last Post. Expecting to be at the Seat of Government by the first of next Month (if my Drivers, who have been sick are able to proceed) I shall be concise in this letter. My Sentiments relatively to the appointment of Mr Benje. Bourne, to be District Judge for the State of Rhode Island, were communicated to you in my last, and it is with...
The letter from Mr King to you, is herewith returned. In your dispatches to him, he ought to be instructed to remonstrate in strong terms against those arbitrary, & oppressive Acts of the B: Ships of War & Privateers, of which we have so often complained to little effect; And to press for redress. The moment for doing these is favorable: self respect and justice to our Citizens (especially our...
Your letters of the 17th 20th & 2 0 th instant, have been received. Enclosed you have a Warrant on the Secretary of the Treasury for two thousand dollars for contingent purposes, agreeably to your request. ’Tis well to learn from Mr Monroe’s own pen, "that he trusted the French Councils relative to us were fixed, & that he should hear nothing more from the Directory on the subject he had...
I learn with concern that the statements from the War department referred to in my speech to Congress, are not yet handed in, & that some Members are ascribing delay of business to the want of information which has been promised, & which they have been expecting. I request that they may be presented without delay. I am always yrs &c. Copy, MHi : Pickering Papers; ADfS , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW ....
If, when this reaches your hands, there should be no contract or other obligation existing on behalf of the U.S. for the purchase of land on the Potomac, intended for the public Arsenal—I should wish all further negociation in this business to be suspended until proper inquiries can be made and information obtained respecting the property at the junction of the Potomac and Shanandoah Rivers in...
Not having seen the conclusion of your Statement for Genl Pinckney (if completed); and not knowing in what manner you propose to sum it up; it has occurred to me that, closing with some such sentiments as the following, might not be improper. That the conduct of the United States towards France has been, as will appear by the aforegoing statement, regulated by the strictest principles of...
The last Post brought me the enclosed letter from General Pinckney. It becomes necessary now to prepare Instructions for him without delay. To bring him fully and perfectly acquainted with the conduct and policy of this government toward France &c.; and the motives which have induced the recall of Mr Monroe. As this measure will excite, when known, much speculation; and set all the envenomed...
I thank you for your private letter of this date, & will arrest the talk intended for the Cherokee Indns until it can be further considered. For this purpose I send the one I have just received from you, back again; with a request that you would pursue the remarks you have begun; and let me have them as soon as you can, conveniently, in the morning; that I may be possessed of them before I see...
Your letter of the 15th came duly to hand. Fortune seems to have declared for us, hitherto, in the Election, of more properly Selection & ballotting, for the odd Commissioner, under the Treaty with G.B.—But something must be done, & I presume immediately, to supply Mr Trumbull’s place as Agent in the other business, to which he was appointed. I wish most ardently that the flames of war were...
Your letters of the 26th and 27th Ulto were received by the Post on friday last. Forwarding without further direction, the Commission appointing Mr Davis Attorney for the District of Massachusetts in place of Mr Otis, after satisfactorily ascertaining those points which had occasioned the hesitation, was perfectly conformable to my intention. I rejoice to find by the account you have given of...
Letter not found: to Timothy Pickering, 17 Feb. 1795. On this date Pickering wrote to GW: “I have been honoured with your note of this morning.”
The enclosed letter came under cover to me from the Sister of General Pinckney. Not knowing whether he had Sailed or not, she took this method of forwarding of it to him—and I request you to do this by the first good conveyance. I am Yours affectly P.S. I shall commence my journey for Philadelphia this afternoon—but business with detain me one day at least in the Federal City. PHi : Dreer...
Your letter of the 11th with two others from you dated the 14th instant, were received yesterday. The summary of the dispatches from Governor Blount, was more agreeable to me than complete transcripts of his letter with the enclosures; and the same practice where information only is intended, may govern in other cases. I am very glad to find that the Creeks are so well disposed for peace with...
It would be eq⟨ua⟩lly imp⟨roper⟩ (on acct of the expence, & other incon⟨venien⟩ces which would attend the measu⟨re) to⟩ continue the militia army in the wes⟨tern⟩ counties in this state, longer ⟨in service⟩ than the nat⟨ur⟩e & exigency ⟨of the case may⟩ require; or, under the reports wh⟨ich pre⟩vail of threatnings ag⟨ainst the Collectors,⟩ & other indications of latent disco⟨ntent,⟩ to disband...
Your letter of the 5th instant with its enclosure, came to hand by Friday’s Post. The extracts therein produced both pleasure & pain—the former at hearing that our Citizens are at length released from their unfortunate confinement in Algiers; the latter to find that others of them have fallen into a similar situation at Tunis; contrary to the Truce, & to the arrangement made with Mr Donaldson....
I have had the pleasure to receive your letters of the 8th and 15th of this month. I feel myself much obliged by the trouble you have taken, in the former, to detail your ideas with respect to introducing the art of husbandary and civilization among the Indians. I confess, that your plan, or something like it, strikes me as the most probable means of effecting this desirable end, and I am...
The Instructions for Mr King, herewith returned, appear to me to be proper. To them, however, I think might be added a desire that he should attempt to remove any doubts which may arise in the construction of them. Article relative to our Trade, the East Indies; and to get relieved if it be practicable from the restrictions on our Vessels going from thence with their Cargoes to China. I shall...
Your letters of the 18th and 19th instant were received by fridays Post the 22d. If the answer which you returned to the Minister of the French Republic, to his enquiry relative to the prohibition of the sale of Prizes, brought by French armed Vessels into the Ports of the United States; should, as it ought, preclude any reply, it would be very agreeable: but it has not been found, that where...
Your private letters of the 29th & 30th have been received. If Mr Churchmans account respecting the broken seal of Mr Monroes letter, to the Department of State be true, it bespeaks the man of candour, and does him credit; but I do not see why, when called upon, he should require time to consider whether he should relate the truth—or "give a certificate that might excite suspicions of innocent...
Your private letter of the 21st instant has been received. Mr Monroe, in every letter he writes, relative to the discontents of the French government at the conduct of our own, always concludes without finishing his story, leaving great scope to the imagination to divine what the ulterior measures of it will be. There are some things in his correspondence, & your letters, which I am unable to...
On considering that part of your letter of the instt which relates to the establishment of a Post at Presqu Isle I have no hesitation in giving it as my opinion that the position is eligable, in several points of view, & that the United States ought to fix one there. The doubt I have is, from whence, in the reduced, & reducing state of the Legion, and the uncertainty of the negotiation of...
As I propose to commence my journey to Philadelphia tomorrow, the intention of this letter is only to acknowledge the Receipt of yours of the 12th instant, enclosing a translation of that from the Dey of Algiers to the President of the United States. Although I begin my journey to morrow, I am unable to say when I shall conclude it. So constant, & excessive have the Rains been in this quarter,...
In my communications to Congress at the opening of the ensuing Session, I shall refer to the department of War for information on the following subjects. A statement of our present Military force—terms of its enlistment —and the disposition thereof—generally. A statement of the fortifications, and defences of the several harbours, agreeably to acts of Congress passed for that purpose. The...
The Spanish Minister, Mr de Yrujo, spent two days with me, and is just gone. I caused it to be intimated to him, that as I should be absent from the Seat of the Government until the middle, or latter end of August, that I was ready to receive his letter of credence at this place. He answered (as I understood it) that his credentials were with his Baggage, on its passage to Philadelphia; and...
The enclosed draughts appear to me to be pertinent to the occasions which have given rise to them; and of course, in my judgment, are to be preferred to general forms. I would have you, however, look to the letter of credence from the French government to Mr Fauchet as somewhat analogous to the recall of Mr Monroe & also to the one given Mr Jay. Yours always MHi : Timothy Pickering Papers.
The extreme badness of the Roads prevented my arrival at this place until nine oclock this morning, of course too late for the Mail of this day—Monday therefore being next Post day, which will occasion a delay of three days—and this probably the loss of a passage to Europe of one of the setts of Letters, herewith enclosed, I have thought it best to return them by Express; and have accordingly...
Having fixed on monday the 13th instt to commence my journey for Virginia—& made arrangements to do business in the federal city on my way down accordingly —It is my desire that ⟨the⟩ Instructions for Genl Wayne’s government at the treaty which is proposed to be held with the Western Indians in June next, may be laid before me without delay, that I may have time to consider them. It is my...
On Saturday morning I received your letter of the 21st instt; with its enclosures. The Post of tomorrow from Alexandria is the first by which I could answer it. If the meeting of the Commissioners, appointed to treat with the Onondagoes, Cayugas and Oneida Indians took place at Albany on the 15th instant, as was expected by the extract of Genl Schuylers letter to the Governor of New York; any...
Your private letter of the 21st instant, did not reach me until yesterday. A late letter of mine to you, will have fixed the Directorship of the Mint upon Mr Boudinot —The application therefore of Majr Jackson, however fit he may have been for the Office, is too late. But besides the reasons assigned in your letter against such an appointment at present, I should have preferred a character...
Your letters of the 2d & 5th instant came to my hands on thursday last, but it was not in my power, conveniently to acknowledge the receipt of them by the succeeding Post. It is a very singular occurrence that Mr Pinckney should make use of a cypher to which there is no counterpart, or key in the Office of State! A kind of fatality seems to have pursued this negociation and in short all our...
I have perused the Bill which you sent me for laying out a town &ca at Presqu-Isle. The portion of land allotted for a fortification at that place by the 4th section, is much too small for the object; for if ever the work is assailed, the houses and other obstructions within range of its shot must be removed, or the artillery therein would be ⟨ren⟩dered useless & of course the defence...
Letter not found: to Timothy Pickering, 12 Aug. 1791. Timothy Pickering wrote to his brother on 12 Aug.: “this day the President sent me a note, desiring to see me” ( Upham, Pickering, Octavius Pickering and Charles W. Upham. The Life of Timothy Pickering . 4 vols. Boston, 1867–73. 2:496).