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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 191-200 of 14,011 sorted by date (ascending)
191General Orders, 22 July 1775 (Washington Papers)
A Court of Enquiry to sit forthwith, President Doctor Foster, Doctor Warren, and Doctor Eustace, Members, to examine into a Complaint exhibited by Mr John Spalding, surgeon to General Putnams regiment against Mr Penuel Chiney—Surgeon’s Mate of the said regiment: All Evidences to attend the Court. Capt. Israel Putnam and Lieut. Samuel Webb, being appointed Aids-de-Camp to Major General Putnam;...
192General Orders, 23 July 1775 (Washington Papers)
As the Continental Army have unfortunately no Uniforms, and consequently many inconveniencies must arise, from not being able always to distinguish the Commissioned Officers, from the non Commissioned, and the Non Commissioned from the private; it is desired that some Badges of Distinction may be immediately provided, for Instance, the Field Officers may have red or pink colour’d Cockades in...
The Retirement of a general Officer, possessing the Confidence of his Country & the Army; at so critical a Period, appears to me to be big with fatal Consequences both to the Publick Cause, & his own Reputation. While it is unexecuted, I think it my Duty to make this last Effort to prevent it; & after suggesting those Reasons which occur to me against your Resignation, your own Virtue, & good...
I have had an Application made to me this day by the Several Captains of Colo. Phinneys Regiment from Casco Bay. They represent that their Men Enlisted & have marched down upon a Promise that they should receive 40/ Advance & Billeting Money at 8d. ⅌ Day—that under this Expectation they left their Familys destitute & have detaind the Teamsters to carry back their Money—They have met with some...
195General Orders, 24 July 1775 (Washington Papers)
It being thought proper to distinguish the Majors, from the Brigadiers General, by some particular Mark; for the future the Majors General will wear a broad purple ribband. Notwithstanding the General Orders, marking the distinctions of General Officers, Aids-de-Camp, &c.—the Generals are frequently stopp’d by the Centinels, which can only happen from the Captains having neglected to read the...
196General Orders, 25 July 1775 (Washington Papers)
Continual Complaints being made that Soldiers of regiments and Companies, after inlisting in one Company and regiment, have gone and enlisted in another insomuch that it would engross the General’s whole time to hear the disputes upon this subject: For the future, any Officers who have any dispute in regard to the men reinlisted, are to apply to the Brigadier commanding their brigade, who will...
On the other side you will receive a Copy of my last, dated at Philadelphia the 31st of May, and to which I refer. I shall say very little in this Letter, for two Reasons; first, because I have received no Letter from you since the one dated in June 1774, and therefore (having wrote often) can have nothing to answer; but, principally, because I do not know whether it may ever get to your...
198General Orders, 26 July 1775 (Washington Papers)
It is recommended to the Commanding Officers of Corps, that all coverings made of Boards, be built in the form of barracks and in the most advantageous manner, at the same time so contrived as to be warm and comfortable in cold weather. All Passes to be discontinued for the future, and no person to be admitted into the Lines, unless introduced by an Officer, who can vouch for him, or by Order...
Yesterday I had an Account that three Men of War and Nine Transports had sailed out of Boston—and in the Evening I received a Note the Copy whereof is inclosed. The great Distress they are in at Boston for fresh Provisions makes it extremely probable they may make some Depredations along the Coasts: I have therefore thought it proper to give you the earliest Notice that the Owners of those...
In my hurry, Yesterday, I forgot the principal thing I had in view, when I sat down to write to you, and that was, to inform you of the indispensable necessity you must now be under of appointing another Attorney. The nature of the business I am now engaged in (which alone is full sufficient to engross the time and attention of any one Man) and the distance I am removed from your business, as...