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    • Washington, George
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    • McDougall, Alexander
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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="McDougall, Alexander" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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Having been favourd with your Letter of the 23d Ulto by Mr Ray, permit me to assure you, that I shall, at all times, esteem it a happiness to have it in my power to shew Civility to any Gentleman of your recommendation—It is exceedingly necessary for every person, appearing in the character of a Gentleman, & not personally known, to bring Letters of Introduction from those that are, otherwise,...
Henry Knox Esqr. having informed me by a Letter from New York of the 27 Ultimo that upon his application you had been kind enough to promise your good offices in Congress, to have Twelve good Iron four pounders, with a Quantity of Shells & Shot directly sent to this Camp and also to spare Two Brass Six pounders; I have now the pleasure to acquaint you, that we are fully supplied with Shells &...
I received your favor of the 2d inst. Last evening, & note what you mention of the Cannon I am in daily expectation of Colonel Knox’s arrivall & untill he comes I cannot with Certainty inform you whether I shall want the Iron Cannon or not. Upon examination of the Stores that were on board the Brigte I find, we Stand in great need of Shells & Shall esteem it a particular favour if you will...
I received your favor upon the Subject of Rations and agreable to your request have Inclosed a List of Rations allowed the Officers of the Regiments before Boston —those in service the 1st of July have been allowed from that time, Others appointed to Office since, from the dates of their Commissions. Having never given any direction about the Officers alluded to, or any Others except those...
Letter not found: to Brigadier General Alexander McDougall, 9 Aug. 1776. In his letter to GW of 12 Aug. , McDougall refers to “your Excellencys favor of the 9th.”
I am this Evening favoured with yours of the 19th from Chatham. I not only approve of the disposition you made of the three Regiments under Colo. Vose, because I think it was a very judicious one, but I had, previous to the Receit of your Letter, determined upon exactly the same plan, and had sent Orders to Colo. Vose to halt at Morris Town, that he might afford protection to the well affected...
I have yours of the 22d and am sorry that Affairs bore so bad an Aspect in your Quarter at that time. But I hope that the late Success at Trenton on the 26th and the Consequences of it, will change the face of Matters not only there but every where else. I crossed over to Jersey the Evening of the 25th about 9 Miles above Trenton with upwards of 2000 Men and attacked three Regiments of...
Letter not found: to Brigadier General Alexander McDougall, 1 Jan. 1777. The Paul C. Richards catalog no. 19, item 455, 1968, quoted the following from the LS : “I have the pleasure to inform you that your sons parole has been sent out to me, amongst others, who are exchanged for officers I have sent in to General Howe. General Maxwell has the proper orders for encouraging the Militia, to come...
General Schuyler having wrote in a pressing and urgent manner for a General Officer to be sent to the Northern department, I inclose you open, a Letter for Brigadr James Clinton, which you will forward to him after sealing it, provided in your opinion his services can be dispensed with where he now is. This I immagine will in a great measure depend on the State of health you are in; If you are...
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. Alexander McDougall, 18 Feb. 1777. McDougall writes GW on 7 Mar . that “I was honored with your favor of the 18th Ultimo.”
I am glad to find by yours of the 16th that your Health is sufficiently re-established to enable you to do your duty. Considering the great dependance which we shall be under the necessity of putting upon Militia for a while longer, we certainly ought not to remove a General Officer from a post, to which, he can, by his influence, draw them when they are wanted. Upon this principle, you were...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 6, 1777. Requests a return of troops. Questions validity of some returns and suspects fraud. Orders McDougall to have troops in readiness at Peekskill. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress . LS, in the handwriting of H, the W. Wright Hawkes Collection of Revolutionary War Documents, on deposit at Union College, Schenectady, New York.
I have to desire, that you will immediately procure and send me exact returns of all the troops belonging to your state, except those which are gone to Tionderoga; and that you will have them assembled with the utmost expedition at Peeks-Kills, there to hold themselves in perfect readiness to march at a moment’s warning. I must, also request, you will make a point of informing me, from time to...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 15, 1777. Approves of McDougall’s decision to order troops to Forts Constitution and Montgomery instead of to Peekskill, New York. Approves stationing of Colonel Henry B. Livingston in Westchester to secure magazines. Urges inoculation when needed. Instructs McDougall to receive Massachusetts troops. Df , dated March 14, 1777, in writings of Robert H. Harrison...
I this evening received the favour of your letter of the 12th instant. The order you gave for such part of Ganservorts regiment as was at Fish-kills to repair to Fort Constitution, I approve of, as also you[r] determination respecting DuBois’s to remain at Fort Montgomery. They may be drawn from these places, when requisite, with the same expedition and ease as from Peeks-kills. The meaning...
When speaking of your Son, I was just now informed, that he had not been provided for in the late appointments of Officers in your State, being under parole when they were made. The part he early took in the Contest & his sufferings for it, would not be rewarded, was he to be neglected; I therefore wish, if he inclines to continue in service, that he may be appointed to the command of One of...
The late collection of Waggons, by the Enemy, upon Long and Staten Islands, some of which are already brought over to Amboy, plainly indicate a Move, whenever the State of the Roads will permit. Several accounts, by Deserters and others, also agree, that Materials have been brought from New York for constructing a floating Bridge, which can be for no other purpose than laying across the...
I am much surprised at never having received any regular account from you, of the late Affair at peekskill. I am yet intirely at a loss to know the Quantity, Quality or Value of the Stores that were lost. A Captain of a Tobacco Ship taken and carried into New York, left that place on Saturday last, he informs that three thousand Men were embarked and laying on Board Transports at Staten...
Yours of the 29th Ulto was delivered to me Yesterday by Mr Laurence. The loss we have sustained in Commissary’s and Quarter Masters Stores is to be regretted, as they are most useful to the Army and not to be replaced at this time, the Commissary’s particularly. I had repeatedly guarded him against suffering any large quantities laying near the Water in such places as were accessible to the...
Inclosed you have an Information which was given in Yesterday, by a Man who was in Newyork on Monday last, & which from a variety of Circumstances, I believe to be in a great measure true; therefore transmit it to you, that you may be prepar’d in case their Destination should be up North River, which at this time is not generally expect’d—I could wish you would give a Copy of this to Genl...
Your favor of the 12th Instt was delivered me last night by Mr Trumbull. I am much surprized to hear, that the innoculation of the Troops had been countermanded, or the least Hint suggested of the sort. I have never done or said anything countenancing such a measure, on the Contrary, I have pressed & urged the necessity of it in every instance, and I must request, that not a Moment may be...
Just after I had wrote very fully to you this Morning I recd yours of the 17th. By the inclosed Resolutions of Congress, which came to hand this day, and which are additions and Amendments to the former Articles of War, you will find that every Continental General has a right to carry the Sentence of a General Court Martial into execution in the State in which he commands. And I shall esteem...
The following are Extracts of Letters which I have just received from Genl Stephen, and are taken from the information of persons sent into New York and Bruswic. New Ark 22d April 1777. By a person to be depended upon, who left New York Yesterday—A Brigade consisting of the 15th & 17th (not exceeding 700 Men) and he believes the 36th & 4th embarked the 20th at night, and he supposes sailed up...
Yours of yesterday came to hand late last Night. As I have heard nothing further of the Troops that embarked on the 20th I can only recommend it to you to keep a vigilant look out for them. The detatchments that are to come on need not bring Camp Kettles with them, if they are wanted with you, as we have a sufficiency here. I am so well convinced of the Justice of your Remark upon the...
I received your favour of yesterday this Moment. In my Opinion it is by no means improbable that the Enemy may aim at another descent upon the Country adjoining the North River; or if they are disappointed in their first design by your late additional strength, they may continue in the River in order to divert our Attention from their real attempt upon Philadelphia: during which Continuance...
At three OClock this morning, I received your favor of the 27th. The intelligence it contains, is interesting and truly distressing. By this time, I fear, the Enemy have effected their purpose and destroyed all the Stores at Danbury; I wish those at Fredericksburg may not have shared the same fate. After accomplishing this enterprize, it is probable they will return to their Ships with...
I last night received your Letter of the 29th Ulto, with its several inclosures. I regret much, that the Enemy should have accomplished their Scheme with so little loss on their part; but I confess, I feared, that it would be the case, and that their retreat would be effected before a sufficient force could be assembled, to cut them off, or to give ’em any great annoyance. I wish you to...
The necessity of having regular Magazines of Provision for subsisting the Army, wheresoever It may act, and the late destruction of the Stores at Danbury, have induced Congress to take the matter into consideration & to come into the Resolves which accompany this. By these you will perceive, that One object of their deliberation was, to have immediate measures taken for the removal of the...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] May 3, 1777. Approves detention of Seward’s company. States that the sailing of British ships from Amboy, New Jersey, necessitates further attention to British movements on North River. LS , in writing of H, The Huntington Library, San Marino, California. Captain Thomas Seward, Third Continental Artillery.
Your detention of apart of Capt. Sewards Company of Artillery, for the reasons you assign, is intirely agreeable to me; and you will observe the same rule with respect to others which shall be coming on in the same circumstances. I should be glad to hear such further particulars of the Danbury expedition, as may have come to your knowlege, that bear the marks of authenticity. I am Dear Sir...