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    • Washington, George
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    • McDougall, Alexander
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="McDougall, Alexander" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 41-50 of 193 sorted by date (ascending)
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] June 20, 1777. Describes General William Howe’s latest moves. Orders McDougall either to remain at present post or return to Peekskill. LS , in writing of H, The Huntington Library, San Marino, California; Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The draft of this letter is endorsed to Alexander McDougall and Brigadier General John Glover....
The Enemy decamped, the night before last, & have returned to their former position from Amboy to Brunswick. This appears to have been in consequence of a sudden resolution, as they had been employ’d in raising a chain of redoubts from Sommerset to Brunswick; which they wou’d not have done, had they at first intended to abandon their new Ground in so short a time. What may have determined them...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] June 23, 1777. Approves of McDougall’s return to Peekskill. States that British are leaving New Jersey. Warns McDougall to expect an attack up North River. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress.
General Putnam’s orders to you to return to Peeks Kill was founded upon a misapprehension of my orders; which required your halting at Pompton, as you were there at a considerable distance from Peeks Kill. But from the late change of circumstances, with respect to the enemy, your countermarch has not happened amiss. It is now pretty evident they are leaving the Jersies, and probably they may...
By an Express this moment arrived from Cape May, The Enemy’s Fleet left Yesterday Morning at Eight OClock—put to Sea and were out of Sight Three Hours when the Express came away. I do not know whether you are coming on with the Two Brigades ordered from peeks Kill to reinforce this Army—If you are, I beg that you will leave the Brigades under the direction of the next commanding Officer to...
Your favour of the 20th Instt came to my hands last Night by Mr P. —I thank you for sending him to me, as I think many valuable advantages may result from his endeavours to serve us. He seems sensible & willing, & I trust will be faithful—I have given him such Instructions respecting his conduct as my hurried Situation will allow. to Mr P. I shall refer for the Acct of things in this Quarter...
I have just reciev’d the inclosed information from General Dickinson through Congress, and in consequence, desire that you will, if the Enemy should appear in force and have more in view than to plunder and distress the Country, join Genl Dickinson with the detachment under your command and give every opposition to the Enemy in their march through the Jersey’s you possibly can. The public...
[ Reading Furnace, Pennsylvania ] September 19, 1777. Orders McDougall to join main Army. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress.
The exigency of our affairs makes it necessary, you should use all the diligence and dispatch in your power to join this army, with the troops under your command. The enemy are making the most vigorous efforts to succeed in their attempt upon Philadel: and it will require our utmost exertions to disappoint them. We shall this day cross the Schulkill at Parkers ford about thirty miles from...
I wrote you on Friday last requesting your earliest arrival with the Troops under your command to join me. This I must repeat, and have sent an Officer on purpose to deliver my Letter, to whom I refer you for the particulars of our Situation & that of the Enemy at this Time. I shall only observe respecting them, that the main body of their Army lay last night, near French Creek Bridge about...