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    • Washington, George
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    • McDougall, Alexander
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="McDougall, Alexander" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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Your favor of the 12th Instt was delivered me last night by Mr Trumbull. I am much surprized to hear, that the innoculation of the Troops had been countermanded, or the least Hint suggested of the sort. I have never done or said anything countenancing such a measure, on the Contrary, I have pressed & urged the necessity of it in every instance, and I must request, that not a Moment may be...
Just after I had wrote very fully to you this Morning I recd yours of the 17th. By the inclosed Resolutions of Congress, which came to hand this day, and which are additions and Amendments to the former Articles of War, you will find that every Continental General has a right to carry the Sentence of a General Court Martial into execution in the State in which he commands. And I shall esteem...
The following are Extracts of Letters which I have just received from Genl Stephen, and are taken from the information of persons sent into New York and Bruswic. New Ark 22d April 1777. By a person to be depended upon, who left New York Yesterday—A Brigade consisting of the 15th & 17th (not exceeding 700 Men) and he believes the 36th & 4th embarked the 20th at night, and he supposes sailed up...
Yours of yesterday came to hand late last Night. As I have heard nothing further of the Troops that embarked on the 20th I can only recommend it to you to keep a vigilant look out for them. The detatchments that are to come on need not bring Camp Kettles with them, if they are wanted with you, as we have a sufficiency here. I am so well convinced of the Justice of your Remark upon the...
I received your favour of yesterday this Moment. In my Opinion it is by no means improbable that the Enemy may aim at another descent upon the Country adjoining the North River; or if they are disappointed in their first design by your late additional strength, they may continue in the River in order to divert our Attention from their real attempt upon Philadelphia: during which Continuance...
At three OClock this morning, I received your favor of the 27th. The intelligence it contains, is interesting and truly distressing. By this time, I fear, the Enemy have effected their purpose and destroyed all the Stores at Danbury; I wish those at Fredericksburg may not have shared the same fate. After accomplishing this enterprize, it is probable they will return to their Ships with...
I last night received your Letter of the 29th Ulto, with its several inclosures. I regret much, that the Enemy should have accomplished their Scheme with so little loss on their part; but I confess, I feared, that it would be the case, and that their retreat would be effected before a sufficient force could be assembled, to cut them off, or to give ’em any great annoyance. I wish you to...
The necessity of having regular Magazines of Provision for subsisting the Army, wheresoever It may act, and the late destruction of the Stores at Danbury, have induced Congress to take the matter into consideration & to come into the Resolves which accompany this. By these you will perceive, that One object of their deliberation was, to have immediate measures taken for the removal of the...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] May 3, 1777. Approves detention of Seward’s company. States that the sailing of British ships from Amboy, New Jersey, necessitates further attention to British movements on North River. LS , in writing of H, The Huntington Library, San Marino, California. Captain Thomas Seward, Third Continental Artillery.
Your detention of apart of Capt. Sewards Company of Artillery, for the reasons you assign, is intirely agreeable to me; and you will observe the same rule with respect to others which shall be coming on in the same circumstances. I should be glad to hear such further particulars of the Danbury expedition, as may have come to your knowlege, that bear the marks of authenticity. I am Dear Sir...