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Articles of Agreement entered into this 31st day of May in the year 1786 between George Washington Esqr of the County of Fairfax and Commonwealth of Virginia of the one part, and James Bloxham lately from the Shire of Gloucester in the Kingdom of England Farmer of the other part. Witnesseth, That the said James Bloxham for and in consideration of the wages, allowances, and priviledges...
Memorandum of an Agreement made & enter’d into by Robert Lewis & Sons of Philadelphia, for & in behalf of his Excellency George Washington Esquire of Mount Vernon in the State of Virginia of the one part, and Joseph Davenport of the County of Burlington in the State of New-Jersey of the other part, Witnesseth, that the said Davenport shall immediately proceed with his Family to a Mill near...
That the money, which can at present be raised, be put into the hands of some proper person, and such person be empowered to engage as many German, or other labourers at Baltimore, or any other part of this continent, as the money will procure. That, if this scheme should prove wholly or in part abortive, the managers hire as many negroes as they may think proper, untill they can import from...
4Advertisement, 23 February 1786 (Washington Papers)
ROYAL GIFT. A JACK ASS of the first race in the kingdom of Spain, will cover mares and jennies (the asses[)] at Mount-Vernon the ensuing spring.—The first for ten, the latter for fifteen pounds the season. Royal Gift is four years old, is between 14 1–2 and 15 hands high, and will grow, it is said, till he is 20 or 25 years of age. He is very bony and stout made, of a dark colour, with light...
A rticles of A greement made and entered into, this Tenth day of December Anno Domini one thousand seven hundred and eighty eight, by and between George Washington Esqr. of Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, State of Virginia, of the one part, and William Garner of Charles County, State of Maryland, of the other part, Witness, that the said William Garner, for, and in consideration of the wages and...
To the Honorable the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia Pursuant to the resolves of the Honble the Senate & House of Delegates, and conformably to the direction of the Executive authority of the State, we repaired to the City of Annapolis, and held a Conference with Gentlemen appointed by the Legislature of Maryland—the result of which is contained in the Inclosure, No. 1. In...
An Agreement made this first day of August Anno Domini one thousand seven hundred and eighty six between George Washington of the County of Fairfax of the one part, and Thomas Mahony of the other part, Witnesseth; that the said Thomas Mahony, for the wages and priviledges herein after expressed doth agree, and oblige himself to work one year from the date hereof for the said George Washington...
List of Ballances due His Excelly—Genl Washington by his Tennants in Berkely County, to Date 25th Decr 1784— [Lot] Nos. 18th Septr 1785 1 Mr John Reiley £ 30.   2 Mr Moses Collett 30.   3 Mr Abram Swanger not Entd 4 Mr Joseph Kersins 36.   5 Mr William Bartless not Entd ⟨6⟩ Mr Anthony Gholston 26.   7
The peregrination of the day in which I parted with you, ended at Marlbro’: the next day, bad as it was, I got home before dinner. In the moment of our separation upon the road as I travelled, & every hour since—I felt all that love, respect & attachment for you, with which length of years, close connexion & your merits, have inspired me. I often asked myself, as our Carriages distended,...
10[Diary entry: 18 October 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 18th. Thermometer at 60 in the Morning—70 at Noon and 70 at Night. Cloudy morning with great appearances of Rain all the forenoon and a little sprinkle of it—but clear warm and pleasant in the Afternoon. Went up to Alexandria agreeably to a summons to give evide. in the Suit between the Estate of Mr. Custis & Robt. Alexander, but the latter not appearing nothing was done & I returned...
Letter not found: to Clement Biddle, 28 Oct. 1786. On 5 Nov. Biddle wrote GW : “I have your Esteemed favour of 28th ulto.”
12[Diary entry: 2 August 1786] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 2d. Mercury at 65 in the Morning—70 at Noon and 70 at N. Much rain had fallen in the Night. The day was variable, but generally cloudy with fine rain about 10 or 11 Oclock which lasted more than an hour—after which the Sun came out but for a short duration. Rid to Muddy hole, but proceeded no further as, at the time I was there the appearances of a wet day were greatest.
13[Diary entry: 27 January 1786] (Washington Papers)
Friday 27th. Thermometer at 30 in the Morning— at Noon and at Night. Clear and pleasant all day; Wind at No. West in the forenoon and Eastwardly afterwards, but not much of it. Mrs. Washington set out after breakfast for Abingdon—to see Mrs. Stuart who is ill. I rid to my Mill and to the Plantation at Dogue run—also to the places where the Muddy hole & ferry people were at Work. Mr. Shaw...
Mrs Bingham has done me the honor to deliver me your Letter of the 15 March with the Seal you have been so polite as to present to me—and for which you will please to accept my thanks I could only wish the object had been more worthy the great talents shewn in the invention and execution of the Seal. You will however believe that I feel my self extremely flattered by this mark of attention and...
AD , DLC:GW . For background to this document, see Farm Reports, 6–12 Dec. 1789, source note . A balk is a ridge or strip of ground left unplowed as a boundary between two furrows. Root of scarcity ( Beta vulgaris or mangel-wurzel) is a coarse beet grown primarily as cattle fodder. For additional information on GW’s cultivation of this plant, see Diaries Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig, eds....
As soon as I had the honor of receiving your Letter containing a proposal of the order of the Knights of Divine Providence; I referred the subject of it to the decision of Congress, in my letter to that august Body dated the 28th of August last, a copy of which is enclosed. Whereupon the United States in Congress assembled, were pleased to pass their Act of the 5th Inst: which is properly...
17[Diary entry: 8 November 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 8th. Thermometer at 52 in the Morning—62 at Noon and 62 at Night. Clear all day, with the Wind high from the No. Wt. Went up to Alexandria, agreeably to a summons, to give testimony in the Suit depending between the Estate of Mr. Custis and Mr. Robt. Alexander. Returned by the New Barn which had got about half the Rafters up. Found Mrs. Stuart, Miss Stuart, and all Mrs. Stuarts...
18[Diary entry: 17 February 1786] (Washington Papers)
Friday 17th. Thermometer at 38 in the Morning—52 at Noon and 48 at Night. A thick fog till 9 oclock A.M. when it dispelled; was clear and pleasant till towards Sunsetting when the western horison seemed to cloud & lower. Wind Southerly all day but the ground very wet—Snow all dissolved where the Sun had access. Rid to my Mill, and the Plantations at Muddy hole, Dogue Run & ferry. Sent for...
19[Diary entry: 25 February 1788] (Washington Papers)
Monday 25th. Thermometer at 32 in the Morning—48 at Noon and 46 at Night. Calm and clear Morning. Wind Southerly afterwards which occasioned a considerable thaw. Mr. Fairfax going away directly after breakfast I rid to the Plantations in the Neck—at Muddy hole and Dogue run. At the first (that is the Neck) the Women were grubbing & fencing along the Creek. At Muddy hole doing the same. The...
The letter which you did me the honor to write to me on the 16th of October only came to hand the 28th of last month. My particular acknowledgments are due to you for your recollection of and attention to me; and I pray you to be assured of the pleasure I felt at hearing that the place lately filled by Mr de Marbois, near the Sovereignty of these States, was so happily supplied—On this...
I have received your letter of the 21st of July together with the Treatise on Agriculture & practical Husbandry. I consider the latter as a mark of attention which merits my warmest acknowledgments. It is a subject highly worthy the attention of every gentleman in this country who has leisure, abilities, or opportunity to improve it. It is the only source from which we can at present draw any...
22[Diary entry: 22 October 1788] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 22d. Thermometer at 49 in the Morning 60 at Noon and 60 at Night. Clear all day with the Wind (especially in the Night) fresh from So. Wt. Sent Mrs. O’Conner to Alexa. Rid to the Plantations at the Ferry, French’s & Dogue run. At the latter, the hands from the two first except the Ferry men & Carts, together with their plows as were the Plows of Muddy were all at work digging...
23[Diary entry: 31 January 1786] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 31st. Thermometer at 42 in the Morning—40 at Noon and 34 at Night. The morning was a little cloudy but the weather soon cleared with a brisk No. Wester which occasioned a great change in the air. Planted a few pine trees in my Wildernesses.
24[Diary entry: 7 March 1786] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 7th. Thermometer at 34 in the Morning—⟨4⟩6 at Noon and 42 at Night. Morning clear & calm—grd. a little frozen. Wind pretty fresh afterwards from the Northwest—notwithstanding which it lowered a good deal towards evening. I rid to Muddy hole and Dogue run Plantations and by the grd. where the ferry hands were at work.
25[Diary entry: 15 March 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 15th. Thermometer at 46 in the Morning—58 at Noon And 56 at Night. The Wind, tho’ there was but little of it, was at No. Wt. Mild and warm. Visited all the Plantations. At all of them, the full compliment of Plows were at work and going on very well. In the Neck, the Women were spreading Dung on the ground intended for Oats and Barley—being the West part of No. 2. At this place ⟨also⟩...
26[Diary entry: 12 November 1788] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 12th. Thermometer at 44 in the Morning—52 at Noon and 51 at Night. Wind at So. Wt. all day & pleasant—Clear in the morning, but a little lowering towards 3 oclock—clear afterwards. The force of yesterday was employed in the roads to day. Mrs. and Miss Stuart went away after breakfast. I rid to the repairers of the Road and to my New Barn—the Rafters of which were all raised about...
Your favor of the 25th in answer to mine of the preceeding week, came safely. At the time I wrote that letter, I was uninformed of the circumstances which you have since made me acquainted with. However, you will be at no loss from the contents of it, to discern that it was Bargains I had in contemplation; and which, from the quantity of Goods at Market—Scarcity of Cash, according to Newspaper...
I came to this place to day, tomorrow (wind permitting) I shall cross the Bay on my way to Philadelphia—Hearing that a Ship with Servants is gone up to Baltimore, and fearing from your answer to my letter (written some time ago from Mount Vernon) that I had not sufficiently explained my meaning I beg leave to inform you that tho’ I should have preferred German Servants, yet I did not mean to...
29[Diary entry: 21 February 1786] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 21st. Thermometer at 40 in the Morning—40 at Noon and 38 at N. Clear, with the wind pretty fresh at No. West in the forenoon calm afterwards. A Mr. McPherson of Alexandria came & returned before dinner. His business was, to communicate the desires of a Neighbourhood in Berkeley County, to build a School & Meeting House on some Land of mine there, leased to one . My answer was, that if...
The articles which you shipped on my Acct on board of the Charming Polly have arrived safe & in good order. As I am under the necessity of purchasing, every year, a quantity of coarse Linen, Blanketings &ca for the clothing of my negroes, and sundry other articles for various purposes, and Goods of every kind being sold in Alexandria at a high advance, I am desireous of knowing if I could not...
Letter not found: to Tench Tilghman, 6 Dec. 1785. Tilghman wrote on 13 Dec : “I have been honored with both your letters of the 30h and 6h instant.”
32[Diary entry: 5 April 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 5th. Thermometer at 51 in the Morning—64 at Noon And 63 at Night. Clear and warm all day, but little wind and that at Easterly. Visited all the Plantations. In the Neck, the same work as yesterday was going forward. At Muddy hole the same also. At Dogue run the same. The two plows at this place finished breaking up the turnip ground in No. 1 about dinner time yesterday & went...
Your favors of the 26th of May, 13th of June and 7th instt are before me; and I believe unacknowledged—The several Articles sent by the Packet came safe, except one of the Wheels belonging to the harrows which was not landed by Captn Ellwood who dropped them at my landing as he passed by in the Night returning. Whether the omission was in him or in putting them on board in Philadelphia I know...
34[Diary entry: 2 December 1788] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 2d. Thermometer at 37 in the morning—47 at Noon and 46 at Night. Clear, with the Wind at No. Wt. but not strong. Visited all the Plantations. In the Neck, the People were gathering Beans, corn, and drawing them in. Only 5 plows were at Work—the Waggon being employed in drawing in Corn. That part of the Corn which was intermixed with Carrots, would be gathered (tho’ not measured) to...
35[Diary entry: 11 March 1786] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 11th. Thermometer at 34 in the Morning—44 at Noon and 40 at Night. Weather clear and cool, Wind at No. West, and ground hard froze in the Morning. Rode to all my Plantns. and to the Mill. On my Return found a Mr. James Hains, the Manager of the James River Canal here—sent by the Directors to me—and to proceed with Letters from me to the Potomack and Susquehanna Works which being...
The Honorable the Congress having by their Proclamation of the 18th Inst. thought proper to discharge their Army I am to desire that immediately on the receipt of this you proceed to discharge the Troops under your Command at Philada. You will please to call at the War Office for Blank discharges—and Report to me your proceedings in this business. I am Sir Your most Obedient Servant NHi .
Mr Fraunces’s letters to you & to me, the last of which I also enclose for your perusal, are so expressive of his wants as to render it unnecessary for me to add ought, on the occasion of them. He has been considered (tho’ confined within the british lines) as a friend to our cause: It is said he was remarkably attentive to our prisoners in the City of New York; supporting them, as far as his...
I have now before me your letters of the 16th & 26th of October and 16th of November. The articles sent by Captn Ellwood arrived in good order and agreeable to the Invoice. Captn Ingraham has not yet arrived but is hourly expected. I think the Irish Linen @ 8/2 is very high, and as there has been a late importation of Linens into Alexandria I will endeavour to supply myself at that place; if I...
Letter not found: to Peterson & Taylor, 11 Dec. 1787. Peterson & Taylor wrote GW on this date : “yours ⅌ the boy came safe to hand.”
40[Diary entry: 1 April 1786] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 1st. Thermometer at 34 in the Morning—34 at Noon and 32 at Night. A very disagreeable mixture of Rain and fine hail fell all day, with a fresh and cold No. easterly wind. Towards night and in the Night it snowed. Few days or Nights this year have been more inclemt. and disagreeable than this.
41[Diary entry: 27 September 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 27th. Thermometer at 60 in the morning—68 at Noon and 72 at Night. Clear Morning with the Wind at No. Wt. Calm afterwards, or very little wind from So. Et. Rid to the Ferry, Frenchs and Dogue run Plantations. The same work at all three, as in the days preceeding—with the Muddy hole hands in aid at the latter. Turned the Mares & Colts from the Pasture at the home house into that at the...
42[Diary entry: 7 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Friday 7th. Road to my Mill, Ferry, Dogue run, & Muddy hole Plantations. Preparing my dry well, and the Well in my New Cellar for the reception of Ice. But little wind, and that Southwardly. Day very pleasant—tho’ it thawed but little. The well in the new cellar was to prove unsatisfactory (see entry for 5 June ). The dry well that GW used as an icehouse was first mentioned in 1773, when it...
In addition to the articles contained in the Memo. given to you some time since, I pray you to procure, and send by Captn Steward the following. A Wimble bit—compleat. Pickled Walnuts & India Mangoes none were sent before. Thompsons Seasons and Gutheries Geography and the Art of Speaking. Some Pamphlets which have been sent to me since I came to Town; and Books purchased for my amusement...
I have received your letter of the 30th of December, written at George-Town. I am very sorry that your business was so pressing as to deprive me of the pleasure of seeing you at this place, while you was in the neighbourhood of it. Doctor Stuart handed me the Indian fabricks which you did me the honor to send by him, and for which I beg you to accept of my warmest thanks. Altho’ they are not...
Your favor of the 21st of Octr would not have remained so long unacknowledged could I with any degree of precision have answered your quæries sooner. I wish it was in my power to do it satisfactorily now. The drought of last Summer in this neighbourhood was so unconsionably severe, that the experiments I contemplated were by no means conclusive—the result such as it is—I will give you. In...
In answer to your letter of the 5th, I have to inform you that I have no untenanted Lands in the Counties of Berkley or Frederick, except two lotts Nos. 5 & 6—the first containing 346½ acres, & the 2d—224½—in the latter, which I bought at the Sale of Colo. George Mercers Estate, in the year 1774—& for which I have had many persons applying to become Tenants. My intention was, after I had...
47[Diary entry: 15 May 1787] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday—15th. Repaired to the State Ho. at the hour appointed. No more States represented, tho’ there were members (but not sufficient to form a quoram) from two or three others—viz. No. Carolina, & Delaware as also Jersey. Govr. Randolph of Virginia came in to day. Dined with the Society of the Cincinnati.
I thank you for asking my commands to Fredericksburg. It is not my wish to be your competitor in the purchase of any of Mr Hunters tradesmen: especially as I am in a great degree principled against increasing my number of Slaves by purchase and suppose moreover that Negros sold on creadit will go high. yet if you are not disposed to buy the Bricklayer which is advertized for Sale, for your own...
Mrs Washington, accompanied by Doctr Craik, are on their way to Virginia—Business of mine will require their stay in Philadelpa— perhaps a week—during this time they will rely upon you for the care & expence of keeping their Horses while they are in the City ; and I shall thank you for such other assistance as Mrs Washington may require & shall call upon you for. I am Sir Yr Most Obedt Servt...
In your name & behalf Mr Laurens, as he passed thro’ this State last Month on his way from the seat of Congress to Charleston —presented me a very handsome gold headed cane: & accompanied it with such favorable sentiments of your good wishes towards the American revolution—& the flattering opinion you entertained of me, as to induce me, contrary to my usual custom, to accept of it. With this...