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§ From George Washington. Ca. 1789–1796. Three notes requesting consultation with JM on unspecified matters: “Thursday, 9 oclk. “If you could make it convenient to call here before you go to the House, you would oblige me. I want to have some conversation with you on two or three matters. Yrs Affectly.” “Sunday ½ past 7 oclk. “If you have leisure to give the enclosed a reading, and me an...
AD , DLC:GW . For background to this document, see Farm Reports, 6–12 Dec. 1789, source note . A balk is a ridge or strip of ground left unplowed as a boundary between two furrows. Root of scarcity ( Beta vulgaris or mangel-wurzel) is a coarse beet grown primarily as cattle fodder. For additional information on GW’s cultivation of this plant, see Diaries Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig, eds....
Extracted from the Report of the Proceedings of the Commissioners, appointed to Treat with the Southern Indians. Cherokees In a talk sent by Bennet Bellew & Nohtowaky on the 13th of Septr from Savannah, the Cherokees were informed by the Commissioners, that the peculiar circumstances of No. Carolina, with respect to the Union, prevented a full communication of Sentiments at that time; but that...
The President of the United States presents his Compliments to Mr Jay, and informs him that the Harness of the President’s Carriage was so much injured in coming from Jersey that he will not be able to use it today. If Mr Jay should propose going to Church this Morng the President would be obliged to him for a Seat in his Carriage. L , in the writing of David Humphreys, NNC .
While I request you to accept my thanks for your kind address, I must profess myself highly gratified by the sentiments of esteem and consideration contained in it. The approbation my past conduct has received from so worthy a body of citizens as that whose joy for my appointmt you announce, is a proof of the indulgence with which my future transactions will be judged by them. I could not...
6[April 1789] (Washington Papers)
[16 April 1789] About ten o’clock I bade adieu to Mount Vernon, to private life, and to domestic felicity; and with a mind oppressed with more anxious and painful sensations than I have words to express, set out for New York in company with Mr. Thompson, and colonel Humphries, with the best dispositions to render service to my country in obedience to its call, but with less hope of answering...
7[Diary entry: 23 April 1789] (Washington Papers)
[23 April 1789] The display of boats which attended and joined us on this occasion, some with vocal and some with instrumental music on board; the decorations of the ships, the roar of cannon, and the loud acclamations of the people which rent the skies, as I passed along the wharves, filled my mind with sensations as painful (considering the reverse of this scene, which may be the case after...
As your truly affectionate and solemn address to me on my late appointment merits, so it receives, the genuine acknowledgements of a grateful heart. Upon perceiving the unanimous voice of my countrymen had called me to occupy the first office in confederated America, I could not hesitate to determine that it was my duty to obey that call: notwithstanding I had at the close of the war, most...
General Washington presents his compliments to the President of the State, and requests his Excellency to communicate the General’s best thanks to the Officers and Gentlemen of the several Corps who did him the honor to form his escort to Philadelphia —General Washington having made his arrangements to be at the place of embarkation for New York, at a particular hour, will find himself under...
I receive with great satisfaction the affectionate congratulations of the President and Supreme Executive council of Pennsylvania on my appointment to the Presidency of the United States. If under favor of the divine Providence, and with the assistance of my fellow-citizens it was my fortune to have been in any degree instrumental in vindicating the liberty and confirming the independence of...