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    • Washington, George
    • Washington, George
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    • Robinson, John
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Being much hurried, I shall refer you to Colonel Stephen for Particulars; who brings a melancholy account of our Back-Settlers. He waits on you for some money to pay the Recruits, and answer such immediate Charges as may arise before I can see you in Williamsburgh; which can not be now, until about the 8th or 9th of November; at which time I should be glad to see you there, and to Receive such...
Nothing could have given me, and the Officers under my command, greater satisfaction, than to have received the thanks of the House of Burgesses, in so particular and honourable a manner, for our Behaviour in the late unsuccessful Engagement with the French at the Great-Meadows; and we unanimously hope, that our future Conduct in the Service of our Country, may entitle us to a continuance of...
We receive fresh proofs every day of the bad direction of our Indian affairs. It is not easy to tell what expences have arisen on account of these Indians; how dissatisfied they are, and how gloomy the prospect of pleasing them appears, while we pursue our present system of management. I therefore beg leave to propose a plan, which I know is exactly agreeable to the french policy of treating...
I can not inform you better of the strange, and unaccountable dilemma I am reduced to, than by transmitting a copy of that part of my letter relative to Recruiting; and a copy also of a Council held here on that occasion. I must beg your assistance in the affair—if you can give any consistently: If I am to suffer, I can only say, that it is but poor encouragement for the exertion of my zeal....
A person of a readier pen and having more time than myself, might amuse you with the vicissitudes which have happened in the Indian Affairs since Mr Atkin came up. I acknowledge my incompetency and therefore shall only observe that the Indians have been pleased and displeased oftener than they ought to have been. And that they are gone off (that party under Warhatclie, I mean) in different...
We, the Officers of the Virginia Regiment, are higly sensible of the particular Mark of Distinction, with which you have honoured Us, in returning your Thanks for our Behaviour in the late Action: and can not help testifying our grateful Acknowledgments, for your high sense, of what We shall always esteem a Duty to our Country, and to the best of Kings. Favoured with your Regard, We shall...
The Bearer, Captain John Mercer, having leave to go down and Settle his accompts with the Committee; is ordered to call upon you for the balance of the ten thousand pounds, which I believe we shall want before another opportunity may offer; this being the time when our Demands for money are greatest. When I left Williamsburgh, I intended to proceed to Winchester; but meeting with Letters at...
John Robinson esqre—Speaker Dear Sir, [Fort Loudoun] October 25th 1757. I applied to the Governor for leave to come down in order to settle my accompts before he left the country, and to represent the melancholy situation of our distressed frontiers—which no written narrative can so well describe, as a verbal account, to a judicious person, inclined to hear. In a verbal account, the questions...
You are no stranger I presume to the late resolutions of the Governor & Council; the consequence of which I meditate with great concern. We are ordered to reinforce Fort Cumberland with 100 men: and, to enable me to carry that number thither, all the Stockade-Forts on the Branch are to be evacuated, & in course all the Sett[lemen]ts abandoned, except what lie under the immediate protection of...
To Jno. Robinson Esqr. Speaker. My dear Sir, Camp at Fort Cumbd 1 Septemr 1758. We are still Incampd here—very sickly—and quite dispirited at the prospect before Us—That appearance of Glory once in view—that hope—that laudable Ambition of Serving Our Country, and meriting its applause, is now no more! Tis dwindled into ease—Sloth—and fatal inactivity—and in a Word, All is lost. if the ways of...