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    • Washington, George
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    • Blair, John
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    • Colonial

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Blair, John" AND Period="Colonial"
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Hearing of the Governors’ departure for England; I think it a duty incumbent on me to inform your Honor, that I lingered a long time under an illness which obliged me to retire from my command (by the Surgeons advice, and with the Governors approbation;) and that I am yet but imperfectly recovered from it: which is the cause that detains me from my Duty. I have many accompts to settle with the...
To Mr President Blair [Fredericksburg, 31 January 1758 ] Honble Sir, I wrote to your Honor yesterday—Since which your favor of the 25th is come to hand. I am greatly distressed to know what conduct to observe with regard to the Indians that are coming to our assistance. I wou’d, notwithstanding the ill state of health I am in, go directly to Winchester, cou’d I flatter myself that the Service...
To The President—written on the road to Winchr Honble Sir, April 2, 1758 The Bearer, unfortunately pursuing me, insted of continuing on from Fredericksburgh (when he heard that I had passed that place in my way to Alexandria) is the cause of the enclosed being detained so long from your Honor. The business which carried me by Alexanda, was partly of a public and partly of a private nature; and...
To The President Honble Sir Ft L[oudou]n the 4[–10]th May, 1758. The enclosed letter from Capt. Waggener, will inform your Honor of a very unfortunate affair. From the best accounts I have yet been able to get, there are about 60 persons killed and missing. Immediately upon receiving this Intelligence, I sent out a Detachment of the Regiment, and some Indians that were equipped for war, in...
At present the Road from Fort Cumberland to Pittsburg is very thickly Inhabited—so much so at least—as to render the communication easy & convenient for Travellers, & for the transportation of Provisions &ca from the Frontiers of this Colony to the last mentioned Garrison, and to the Settlers that now are, or may hereafter be fixed on the Ohio; but if the People on the other side of the...
To the President. Honble Sir. Fort Loud[oun] the 17th Aprl 1758. An unlucky, but unavoidable accident happened in the neighbourhood of Pattersons fort the other day. The Proceedings of an examining Court of Officers on that occasion (which are herewith sent) will bring your Honor acquainted with the circumstances. I caused a very strict enquiry to be made into the conduct of Mr Chew, that...
To The President. [Fort Loudoun, 24 April 1758 ] Honble Sir, Your letter of the 19th instant, intended to come by Colo. Stephen, was delivered me to-day, about noon, by Express. As there are several matters contained in it of an interesting nature, I chose to be aided in my determinations, by the advice of my Officers; and have enclosed, your Honor their, and my opinion on the several heads. I...
To The President Honble Sir, Mount-Vernon, the 20th February, 1758. I set out for Williamsburgh the day after the date of my letter by Jenkins; but found I was unable to proceed, my fever and pain encreasing upon me to an high degree, and the Physicians assured me, that I might endanger my life in prosecuting the journey. In consequence of this advice, I returned back to this place again, and...
To The President of Virginia [Fort Loudoun, 26 April 1758 ] Honble Sir, Having wrote fully to your Honor on the 24th past, I have little to offer at this time[.] I then thought to have sent an Officer for money, but all of them that can be spared from the several Garrisons, must be employed in recruiting. I have therefore ordered Mr Gist, a volunteer in my Regiment, to wait upon your Honor for...
To The President. Honble Sir. Williamsbgh 28th May, 1758. I came here at this critical juncture, by the express order of Sr John St Clair, to represent in the fullest manner, the posture of our Affairs at Winchester; and to obviate any doubts that might arise from the best written narrative—I shall make use of the following method as the most effectual I can at present suggest, to lay sundry...