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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 1591-1620 of 1,869 sorted by date (ascending)
1591August [1799] (Washington Papers)
1. Morning clear—wind Southerly, & Mer. at 74—hot about midday & 72 at Night. A moderate & fine Rain began about 4 oclock & contd. more or less until 6. 2. Rain in the Night, & Clouds very heavy abt. sunrise. Mer. at 74—at its highest 76 and at Night 75. Captn. Blue of the Amn. Army who came here yesterday to dinner returned to day after breakft. Capt. William K. Blue (d. 1802), of Virginia,...
1592[Diary entry: 1 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
1. Morning clear—wind Southerly, & Mer. at 74—hot about midday & 72 at Night. A moderate & fine Rain began about 4 oclock & contd. more or less until 6.
I shall be obliged to you for letting Mr Blagden know, that I forsee nothing, at present, that will prevent my being at the Union Tavern in George Town on Monday next (the 5th instant) by eleven Oclock. When & where, if he will attend I shall be provided with, & ready to pay him, a thousand Dollars in Columbia Notes. I thank you for the information, & sentiments given in your last favour of...
1594[Diary entry: 2 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
2. Rain in the Night, & Clouds very heavy abt. sunrise. Mer. at 74—at its highest 76 and at Night 75. Captn. Blue of the Amn. Army who came here yesterday to dinner returned to day after breakft. Capt. William K. Blue (d. 1802), of Virginia, had been appointed cornet of light dragoons in 1793 and lieutenant in July 1794 and was honorably discharged on 1 Nov. 1796. On 12 July 1799 he was...
1595[Diary entry: 3 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
3. Morning cloudy, but clear afterwards. Mer. at 72 in the Morning–80 at Noon & 77 at Night.
1596[Diary entry: 4 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
4. Morning a little cloudy and very little wind. Mer. at 70 Noon, and afternoon, wind Easterly with heavy Clouds in the North, South & East, and light sprinkling rain here. Mer. 70 at Night. Doctr. Stuart & his brother Richard & Mr. Foot dined here & returned afterwards.
Your favor of the 13th Ulto, accompanying the oration of Mr Maxcy, has been duly received, and for your politeness in sending me the latter, I pray you to accept my thanks. The sentiments expressed by that Gentleman on Government, and tendency of such conduct as is opposed to the Public functionaries in our own, are too just not to carry conviction to every well disposed, and reflecting mind....
Your favour of the 18th Ulto came to hand in due course of the Mail, and I thank you for the information contained in it. Is it not time to learn, Officially, and unequivocally, the result of the Presidents message, and consequent (I presume) intimation to the French Government, respecting the appointment of Envoys to Treat with it? Having no Church nearer than Alexandria (nine miles distant)...
1599[Diary entry: 5 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
5. Clear & Warm. Went up to George Town, to a general Meeting of the Potomac Company—dined at the Union Tavern & lodged at Mr. Law’s. In July 1799 a letter had been sent to each shareholder in the Potomac Potowmack Company, outlining the financial plight of the company and soliciting assistance. The president (James Keith) reported that tolls were down from the previous year and work had been...
1600[Diary entry: 6 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
6. Clear & warm. Returned home to dinner—found Genl. Wm. Washington of So. Carolina & Son here. Wind Southerly. William Washington was one of GW’s particular choices for the officering of the provisional army. He was appointed brigadier general of the United States Army on 19 July 1798 and retired on 15 June 1800. William Washington had an only son, William Washington (1785–1830).
1601[Diary entry: 7 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
7. Mer. at 72 in the Morning, and 80 at Night. Wind Southerly. The following Gentlemen dined here—viz. Colo. Fitzgerald—Doctr. Craik & Son—Mr. Wm. Craik—Mr. Herbert & Son Jno. C. Herbert—Colo. Ramsay—Mr. Potts—Mr. Edmd. Lee—Mr. Keith—Lieut. Kean of the Marines—and Mr. Chas. Fenton Mercer. lieut. kean : probably Newton Keene (b. 1768), son of Capt. Newton Keene and Sarah Edwards Keene of...
1602[Diary entry: 8 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
8. Morning calm & clear. Mer. at 77–88 at highest & 80 at Night. About 4 o’clock their was a moderate rain for about 10 minutes—but the grd. was not wet by it. Genel. Washington & son went away after breakfast & Doctr. & Mrs. Jenifer came to dinner.
1603[Diary entry: 9 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
9. Mer. at 73 in the Morning & a light breeze from No. Wt.—82 at Night. Clear & warm all day. Doctr. & Mrs. Jenifer went away after breakfast—as did Mrs. Law.—Mr. Law havg. left it on Monday last.
1604[Diary entry: 10 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
10. Morning perfectly clear. Wind from So. Wt. and Mer. at 75—at highest 87—and at Night 74. In the afternoon heavy clouds & fine rains all around us but none fell here.
Daily expectation of Genl Washington’s arrival, must be received as my apology for not having given your obliging favour of the 25th of June, an earlier acknowledgment. He did not (on account of the indisposition of his Son, in North Carolina) reach this place until the 6th instant. He left us yesterday, with the young Gentleman; both in good health, and Spirits. Permit me to offer you my best...
[ Mount Vernon, August 11, 1799. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from G—— Washington to General Hamilton,” Columbia University Libraries.
1607[Diary entry: 11 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
11. Morning clear—wind Southerly—and Mer. at 73; 83 at highest—& 80 at Night—clear all day—& wind pretty fresh.
Sometime ⟨between illegible ⟩ment to the walks of ⟨private illegible ⟩ girl*, the body servant of Mrs Washington⟨,⟩ absconded without the least pr⟨ovocation⟩ and without our having ⟨ illegible sus⟩picion of such, her intention ⟨ illegible ⟩ whither she had gone. At length, we learnt ⟨ illegible ⟩ got to Portsmouth in New H⟨ampshire; in⟩ consequence of this information ⟨ illegible ⟩ authentic)...
Your private letters of the 29th Ulto & 5th instant, have been duly received. Mr Bordley for presenting, and you for forwarding his Essays on Husbandry, are entitled to, and, accordingly receive, my thanks for these instances of both your kindnesses. (Confidential) I think you Wisemen of the East, have got yourselves into a hobble, relatively to France, Great Britain, Russia & the Porte—to...
A day or two after my last letter to you was sent to the Post Office, I received your obliging favor of the 2d instant. The embarrassments occasioned by the late appointment of Envoys, begin now to shew themselves; and must place the Government—whether it advances towards or retreats from the object, for which they were appointed, in a delicate situation. Of the two evils, the least, no doubt...
1611[Diary entry: 12 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
12. Morning quite clear—wind westerly—and Mer. 70 at sunrising—82 at highest & 80 at Night. Clouds & some rain to the Southward—but none fell here.
I have duly received your letter of the 7th inst., enclosing reccommendations in favor of Mr James Glenn for a Captaincy in the Provisional Army; and shall attend to your request to return this, and similar papers, whenever the list for Virginia shall be completed. But, Sir, I must candidly acknowledge to you that I see no prospect of completing the selection of Officers from this State, for...
I should have acknowledged the receipt of your favor of the 22d Ultimo before this, had I not been for sometime in daily expectation of seeing Genl Wm Washington, to whom I wished to communicate the contents of it. The General was here a few days since, when I put your recommendation of Captn Edmund Taylor for Brigade Inspector into his hands, and as he is gone on to Philadelphia, I presume...
1614[Diary entry: 13 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
13. Morning perfectly clear and quite calm. Mer. at 73–82 at Night & close—thunder, lightning & rain in the West & No. Wt. but none fell here.
Your letter of the 10th came to hand yesterday—and since you have desired it, the subject of this shall be confined to Mr Carrolls lot only. I am not at all solicitous to purchase it; nor shall I pronounce the price he has set upon it, high, or low; The situation alone constitutes the value of it in my estimation, but my becoming the purchaser thereof, depends upon three things; two of which I...
Enclosed are sundry letters (as mentioned on the other side) which have come to my hands, recommending Captain Edmund Taylor and Captain William K. Blue for the Office of Brigade Inspector. As this Officer is to be appointed by the Inspector General I forward these letters for your consideration; and add, that I have not a personal knowledge of the Gentlemen recommended which can enable me to...
1617[Diary entry: 14 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
14. Morning clear & calm. Mer. at 71 and at night 83. Wind Southerly & Fresh after the Morning—with clouds to the West.
It is reported, & generally believed, that the Houses I am building in the Federal City are engaged to you. To your having the houses I have no objection, nor should I have any to the prevalence of the report, if a specific agreement had ever taken place. But as this is not the case, and until it happens may, & doubtless will be injurious to me, inasmuch as they may prevent applications from...
Enclosed are sundry letters (as mentioned on the other side) which have come to my hands, recommending Captain Edmund Taylor and Captain William K. Blue for the Office of Brigade Inspector. As this Officer is to be appointed by the Inspector General I forward these letters for your consideration; and add, that I have not a personal knowledge of the Gentlemen recommended which can enable me to...
1620[Diary entry: 15 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
15. Morning Calm & clear. Mer. at 80. Wind Southerly afterwards & Mer. at 85—and 82 at Night. Mr. Thos. Digges dined here.