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General Washington presents his compliments to Mr Howell and requests the favor of his company at dinner tomorrow 4 oclock. Monday. Privately owned.
By the arrival of the Baron Steuben I have received the Letter from General Haldemand alluded to in my last communication to your Excellency; a Copy of which I take the first occasion of laying before Congress. With perfect respect I have the honor to be Your Excellency’s Most Hble Servt. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
To the several points mentioned in your Letters of 28th & 29th ulto, I answer, that I am at present totally ignorant of the strength of the Garrison which will be destined for West Point, the ensuing Winter, not having as yet had any conference with the Committee of Congress on that subject; I should think however, that a supply of forage and fuel for a Corps of 500 Men, will be sufficient,...
I have thrown together the following sentiments on the papers you put into my hand yesterday. Brevets which have been given with conditions annexed, ought, undoubtedly, to have the conditions fulfilled; because it is a contract between the Parties. Simple Brevets, must be determined by the usage & Custom of other Armies, if there is no established rule for considering of them in our own; I...
In Bradfords Paper of the 30th Ulto I perceive an anonymous advertisement of a person who wants employment as a miller, referring to you for his character. If this is such, as in all points of view I could approve, it is very likely I might employ him at my Mills in Virginia (ten miles from Alexa.). My present miller who has lived with me thirteen or fourteen years; & who perhaps understands...
I have carefully perused the Papers which you put into my hands relating to Indian Affairs. My Sentiments with respect to the proper line of Conduct to be observed towards these people coincides precisely with those delivered by Genl Schuyler so far as he has gone in his Letter of the 29th July to Congress (which, with the other Papers is herewith returned)—& for the reasons he has there...
Through Dr Witherspoon I have received your Memorial with the enclosed Certificates; but so much time has elapsed Since the period you allude to, in which you say you promised to perform particular services for me, that I have not the least remembrance of any circumstance of the kind; but this however, I recollect, that the morning on which General Howe moved with the British Army from the...
Upon a careful examination of the Report delivered to Congress the 17th of June, by the Committee on the Peace Arrangement the following remarks have occurred. Nothwithstanding there may not be any very essential difference between the proposed Plan for a standing Force now under consideration, & the Sketches which were given in my Memorial of the 1st of May; yet it is my wish to make known...
I enclose to your care a Letter to Mr Cowvenhoven in answer to his Memorial & request, and his Letter to you & the President of Congress. In the course of Mr Cowvenhoven’s Memorial he takes occasion to mention his assistance to one Mr Wyckhoff, who, he says, was employed by Governor Clinton & me to bring Money from Long Island; all the agency I had in this matter, was giving an Order, at the...
As there is but one Regiment at Philadelphia to March to West Point, and the Troops when they get there take their Orders from the Commanding Officer of the Garrison (agreeably to the Original disposition of them) till Congress shall have determined upon a Peace Establishment; there can be no necessity for your Marching with your present command, in its reduced state to that place. I mention...
It is sometime since I was favored with your Letter of the 22d of July—not however by the Gentleman for whose benefit it was written—him I have not yet seen—when I do, I shall take pleasure in shewing him every civility in my power agreeably to your wishes. But for an expression in your letter which led me to expect that another on a more interesting subject would soon follow (but which is not...
It was with great concern I heard of your Indisposition—later accts say you were upon the recovery—and nothing would give me more pleasure than the confirmation of it from under your own hand. I am not able to give you any information on the point you requested, at our parting. Congress have come to no determination yet respecting the Peace Establishment, nor am I able to say when they will. I...
Your letter of the 16th of August with the Accts enclosed, did not reach my hands till within these few days. I have no doubt, because I suppose S:C: to be an honest Man, that the Monies charged in his Acct have been expended, & therefore should be paid; but the Services which were rendered by him (however well meant) was by no means adequate to these Expenditures—My Complaints on this head,...
My last letter to you, was dispatched without the enclosed; wch was forgot at the time of Sealing it. Since then, I have received your letter of the 23d of August, & am very sorry to find by it that you still continue so much indispos’d. Doctr Craik will write to you by this opportunity, & will, I presume, give you his opinion of the propriety of giving the Air & Climate of Rhode Island a...
If you have not already sent the two Pipes of wine to Virginia which you promised to do, and it is no disappointmt to you, to retain one of them, the other will be sufficient for my purpose, as I have just got an Acct of the arrival of two other Pipes of Madeira in Maryland, for my use. If there are Wine & Beer Glasses (the latter of the same shape but larger) exactly like those which Mr...
Long before this letter can have reached you, the Cost of the first Wine had from Mr Searle must, no doubt, have been paid to you—before the receipt of it, I saw Mr Parker who told me the Money had, for sometime, been lodged in the hands of a Gentleman (whose name I do not now recollect) in New York, and notice given of it to the Person at whose House you usually lodge in the City. I have...
Your Letter of the 6th by Lieut. Rose has been duly received. As the Secrety at War had undertaken to furlough all that part of the Army which lay South of the Delaware, I was much surprized, on the receipt of your Letter, to find that business so irregularly conducted at Fort Pitt; but on enquiry at the War Office, the difficulty seems evidently to have originated from circumstances that...
Your two Letters of the 3d & 10th inst., with the enclosed Returns, have been duly received. To prevent the trouble in Future of transmitting the particular Returns of each Corps, let the Fort Major or Adjutant, digest them into one General Return, as I only wish to have a view of the general strength & state of the Troops. As Congress have reassumed the consideration of a Peace Establishment,...
The Resolve of Congress, enclosed in Your Excellency’s favor of Yesterday, for permitting me to have access to the Secret Papers of Congress, under the same injunctions as Members; is a high & honourable testimony of the confidence reposed in me by that Honble Body, and is only to be equalled by the polite, and flattering expressions with which you have accompanied it. I have the honor to be...
By his Excellency George Washington Esqr General and Commander in Chief of the Armies of the United States. This Certifies that the Bearer Mr Strubing has served as a Lieutenant of Horse four years in the Army of the United States of America, in which character he has conducted himself as a faithful and deserving Officer. Given at Princeton this 18th day of September 1783. DLC : Papers of...
Be so good as to receive from Colo. Smith, Fifty Guineas which were left in his hands, for my use, by the Count Del Vermé; and apply them to my Credit in payment for the Pipe of Wine (which was to be sent to Virginia) with the other things—if they could be got, agreeably to my former letter of the 12th. You would do me a favor by requesting Mr Frauncis to enquire if a good Cook, German I...
The letter from General Duportail of which the enclosure No. 1 is a copy, was presented to me yesterday. I beg leave, agreeably to the wishes of these Gentlemen, to recommend their case to the immediate & serious consideration of Congress. I take the liberty also, of laying before Congress an extract of a Letter No. 2 from Majr Genl Knox, on the subject of Clothing for the Troops on the North...
I have received your Letter of the 16th inst., and this day have laid it before Congress, their determinations, which I hope will be speedy, & agreeable to your wishes, shall be transmitted to you as soon as they come to hand. I am Dr sir DLC : Papers of George Washington.
The last Post brought me your favor of the 17th. I am sorry Mr Morris did not pay the money at the time and in the manner I expected—Inclosed I send you Eight Hundred Dollars in Bank Notes, & will write to you more fully in a day or two; business prevents me from doing it at this moment. I am Dr Sir Yr Most Obedt Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Mrs Custis has never suggested in any of her Letters to Mrs Washington (unless ardent wishes for her return, that she might then disclose it to her, can be so construed) the most distant attachment to D.S.— but if this should be the case, and she wants advice upon it; a Father Mother, who are at hand, & competent to give it, are at the same time most proper to be consulted on so interesting an...
At the sametime that I again thank your Excellency for offering me part of the Claret which you have at Baltimore, let me once more pray that my acceptance of it may put you to no inconvenience. I should be unhappy if I thought this would be the case. If, on the other hand, you can conveniently spare it, and Colo. Tilghman should be in Baltimore, I could wish to have it put into his care; as...
I have received your Letter of the 4th inst., and shall transmit to the Secretary at War, your acceptance of the Commutation in lieu of half pay. Whatever is necessary to be done for the future settlement of your Accounts, you will be fully informed by applying to the Pay Master General, John Peirce Esqr. who is authorised by Congress to make a final adjustment with the Officers of the Army. I...
By His Excellency G. Washington, Genl & Commander in Chief &c. &c. this may Certify that Lt Colo. Villefranche entered the Service of the United States in 1776, as Captain of the Corps of Engineers, in 1777 was promoted to a Majority, and in May 1783 to a Lieut. Colo in that Corps. From the testimony of Majr Generals Heath, Howe, McDougall and Knox, under whose Orders Lt Colo. Villefranche has...
With this you will receive the letter of your Aunt Lewis, to me. Altho’ I believe the ground she is proceeding upon, has more of the ideal than real advantages, which she expects from it, yet I have no objection to the experiments being made, & pray you to pursue the dictates of her letter, & communicate to me the result as soon as the necessary enquiries are made. Let me beg of you to make...
I was this day in conference with a Commee of Congress upon the subject of your letter to me of the 16th Instt—they discovered every disposition to relieve the the Gentln of your departmt from the state of uncertainty in wch they are at prest, but wished previous to their making a report to Congress to obtain your Sentiments more in detail upon a proper Peace establishment for the Engineering...