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Yours my dear Sir, of the 15th Ulto: is in the same stile of partial friendship which I witnessed many years ago.—If the author of the Group ever deserved half the encomiums which you have lavished on her talents, it ought to be rescued from oblivion.—I know of no one living who can or will do this but yourself.—You expressed a wish in yours to have your memory refreshed.—In consequence of...
It is very many days since I address’d a line to any of my Quincy friends, and as I think I have been some time in arrears for a very agreeable letter from the late President, my first attention is due to desire and I am quickened to discharge this obligation from having recently heard by my Sister Otis, that your health is declining.—The years you have counted up admonish that the harbingers...
Yes, my dear Friend—I am indeed the only one of my Father’s house who yet stands in this fading, precarious portion of existence.—Little did I think my excellent brother would be called before me, but the thread of my life has been drawn out until I stand a wonder unto all around me.—I hope it is to add another note of gratitude to that unbounded sum which is due to my Creator and Preserver.—...
I doubt not Sir, You will be pleased when I tell You that the Evening of my life is smoothed by the intercourse with a number of sensible, pious, elegant correspondents.—Younger than myself, indeed they are—but there are yet a few left, who stand near the grade of old age as well as myself, though not so far advanced.—It is truly a satisfaction to me to receive letters from a Gentleman with...
I have myself, my dear Friend, been very unwell since I received your short but consolatory letter dated Feby. 21st. which inform’d me of your recovery from a languid state of health. You observ’d then it was only partial, I hope now it is complete.— Inform me also when you write again, of the health of Mr. Adams.— I regret much for him the privation of sight— it is a rich blessing at all...
The sudden death of a very amiable Grand–Son, has involved myself and family in such deep affliction, as prevents me from replying, as I intended this day, to the last mark, of your kind attention, dated the Second Instt.—I thought it my duty to return Governor Mc.Kean’s letter immediately, as requested.—By your permission I took the liberty to have it copied, and may observe upon it, when I...
Your Letter of the 24th. Ulto: ought to be early acknowledged by one, who, through a long life has not been insensible of the worth of friendship, or negligent, whenever in her power to cherish the invaluable treasure.—I am therefore, delighted to see our young people strengthening each other in that disposition, which may be a source of happiness to them as they tread over the stage of life...
I did not my dear Mrs. Adams, write by yr Son when last in Plymouth, because I wished to retain the very valuable Letters of the American Minister at Petersburg, a little longer in my hand.—I wish’d my Son Winslow and his father to peruse them, which from sickness and other causes they could not do immediately.—I have not communicated them to any eye but those of my Son’s, though I think them...
With the same glow of affection which has for many years been cherished in my bosom, I received yours of the first Instt. and seldom indeed do I meet with any thing in the Letters of my Friend Mrs Adams that causes a moments uneasiness.—But I have been anxious since your last & more so since the arrival of this day’s Post least some accident may have happened to a valuable Packet which I was...
I cannot express to my dear Mrs. Adams the ardent desire I feel that we might at least have one more personal interview, before we are either of us called to leave the passing scenes of pleasure and pain, that have so long danced before us and vanished as the vapour of the morn. I long to have you by my side in my retired mansion at Plymouth, where we might indulge the feelings of the heart...