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    • Van der Kemp, Francis Adrian
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Isaak Iselin geschichte der menschheid menschheit vol. ii Lib. 7—HauptSt. 23 pag 217. the Christian Religion. During the period that the monstrous Edifice of Roman grandeur tottered under its own weight; when its Political body wasted itself, by its own internal corruption, arose in the most abandonned province, the Christian Religion. This Divine doctrine distinguished itself at it s first...
The condescending kindnesses and proofs of your regard, with which I have been honoured by you induces me, to take the liberty of offering to your acceptance, the humble tribute of a female acquaintance , with which I was lately favoured. I paid her a visit at New-york and could not decline, to Send you in her name her last publication—before She returned to her native country— Amsterdam . She...
I was highly gratified with your favour of the 1 of maÿ —as I am now convinced—that no doubt remains with you, if I could abuse the confidence, with which I was honoured—It is with me a Sacred principle—never to make use—in any manner—of a trust—as upon an explicit permission—under no pretext whatever—not even to oblige the friend of my bosom—not even to hurt a rancourous enemÿ—And now I...
In answer to your favour of July the 30 —I must once more return to the papers , which I Send to England for publication; and am Satisfied with the precautions, I deemed requisite, to conceal the author . Since I received last week information from London of the Sudden desease of mr joÿce —whom I had intrusted with the business I then directly adressed mr. Belsham , Solliciting him to inquire...
Although it is not mÿ power—to make this Letter in any manner interesting, yet your courtesy and kindness towards me would prompt me to answer your favour of Nov. 24 —with which I was honoured. I Should have acquitted myself of this duty at a more early period, had I not been a martyr of a wounded leg, imprudently neglected, during three months. The pains being So acute, that I was not...
I Should be at loss for an apologÿ in writing you again, had not the polite manner—in which you was pleased to bestow on me a new favour required mine Sincere thanks for this condescension. I feel proud—I was highly gratified with this distinction—more So—as it enabled me—by your delicate hint of a radical defect to fill up the gap in this Sketch. It might have been, that in its developing the...
That I did not thank you for your attention—in favouring me with the Proceedings and report of the commissioners for the university in virginia , was not—that I undervalued the gift—but I presumed—that a mere complimentary Letter could not be acceptable—while my manifold occupations—and Since Some time—my precarious State of health and dimmed eyes—compelled me—to make for a while a Sacrifice...
I do not search for an apologÿ, in sending you included imperfect Sketch of a work , which I ardently wished, to see executed bÿ a masterlÿ hand If to former favours—which can not be obliterated by me—you would join another by condescending to gratifÿ me with your opinion and Strictures I should feel myself ÿet higher indebted to your Patronage—while—I should consider—to have not Laboured in...
Reperusing your interesting Syllabus I have recalled in my mind a train of thoughts—which I brought in writing about twenty years past and Send then—for his criticisms—to my old friend Joshua Toulmin of Taunton —father of the judge in the Missisippi Territory —which treatise has been irrecoverably lost on its passage to England . Having hurted my right leg—in my garden—by carelessness—which...
was I to answer a letter—So gratifying to my feelings, as interesting in itself, dated 9 Febr —to another man as mr. Jefferson , who honoured me with his courtesy—and So kindly condescended, to give me proof upon proof of his confidential regards, I should feel myself obliged, to make an apology for my long Silence. Now I am dispensed of this task, and communite communicate to you my Sincere...
Since I had the honour of sending you mÿ last letter , I reviewed mÿ Sketch and discovered, that I did neglect a rich mine, which he, who intends, to execute this plan, must have previouslÿ explored. After the General Sketch of Europe from the invasion of the Northern Nations ought to be inserted “Value and necessity of Studÿing the Annals, Records, Ballads, Romanzas and other writings of the...
Mrs A.A had the kindness to Send me inclosed N o of the Month Rep—to convey it, after its perusal, to Monticello . I expect, it is the only one on our continent. That excellent Lady received it from her Son at the court of St. James . Although I regret, that there has not been complied with my injunctions—Still I rejoyce at the publication, and can find reasons to palliate this appearing...
I take again the liberty of Sending you a few lines—and this without any further apologÿ, as I take it for granted that you do me the justice, that I can not wish, to intrude on your more Serious occupations, or importune you, for making a Sacrifice of your precious time, in answering these:—what value I may place on one of your lines—I do not desire these at that rate—and on this footing I do...
During Several months I intended to write you—which for a while was delayd by my occupations during the Summer Seasons—and Some gloomy apprehensions, that I should write in vain. In this painful anxiety Some dark rumours, that mr jefferson was Severily indisposed made me abandon the thought and I listened rather to fear than to hope. Indeed this year had been to me peculiarly distressing—by...
The manÿ condescending proofs, which I received from your politeness, imbue me with the confidence to Sollicit another favour from your kindness. I know too well, I can have no claims, but that, which originates in your indulgence—and in your ardent wish to promote the indagation of truth. About three years past I Spend a few days with my old respected friend at Quincÿ , whom you, perhaps,...
Contemplated work “Moral and Physical causes of the Revolutionarÿ Spirit, in the latter part of the 18 th centurÿ, with their probable issue on both Continents Ardua quæ pulcra ” (Rough outlines dotted) General observations (Preliminarÿ) Previous Station Situation of
After So long a Silence, I trust, it Shall not be deemed an intrusion as it will not interrupt you too long in more Serious occupations, when I address you once more with a few lines. I wished—it was more in mÿ power, to render these Some what more important, or at least, that I might be in another manner Ser v iceable.     It cannot be Sir! or a man of your talents—industry and activity must...
As I have nothing—deserving your attention—to communicate, I rather Should deem it improper to answer Your favour of the 16 with which I was honoured, was it not—that your courtesy imposed upon me a duty—to free you from an error which caused you some concern—not that I am apprehensive—that you had any thing to fear from a clamorous rabble of ignorant—bitter bigots—as I would do you the...
The distinguished proof of your esteem, with which you favoured and gratified me, when you honoured me with your Letter of apr. 25. induces me to take the liberty of Sending you a few lines more . I am pleased to Suppose, that my last has not been unacceptable, and that you approved the course, which I have taken with the papers with whom I was entrusted. These are now on their way to Old...
Accept mÿ Sincerest thanks for the distinguished proof of your confidential esteem, with which you have been pleased to gratifÿ me . I Suppose, I consult your wishes, to copÿ it, and Send it in mÿ handwriting to mÿ friend in England , for publication in the Month. Repos. of Theol . with the expressed request, that neither he or his friends by insinuation or allusion Should drop a hint in with...