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One of the many brave and gallant Actions that have graced our Arms, I take the Liberty of writing you an Account of. The most important Transactions, since your Abscence, you are undoubtedly already informed of; but as this, I am about to relate, is just come to hand, I embrace the Opportunity of sending you an Account of it by the Express. Not long before the Date of this, General Gage...
Since your absence your family has been visited with such a scene of sickness, as, I believe it never before saw. Mrs’s. Adams, Tommy, Copeland, Susy and Patty have been sick with the disorder which began to rage when you left Braintree; but they have all recovered saving Patty who Yesterday lay at the point of death. Little Tommy, whom I affectionately love, had it so severely, that his life...
You mention, Sir, in the beginning of your Letter, that you are indebted to me for several Letters. I shall never presume to consider you indebted in that Respect, or myself entitled whilst the public at large, or any Individual of it, has a Title to your Attention in preference to mine. It was not a Consideration of your being indebted Sir, that has prevented my frequent writing to You, but...
Last Monday Dr. Mather Byles was tried by Virtue of a late Act of this State, and found by the Jury so inimical, as to render his residence in the State dangerous to the Liberties thereof. He is to be sent to some quarter, where his local Situation will deprive him of the power to injure the State. Tomorrow some others are to have their Trial—they have engaged Attornies. The Inferior Court...
The day before Yesterday Mrs. Adams was delivered of a daughter; but it grieves me to add, Sir, that it was still born. It was an exceeding fine looking Child. Mrs. Adams is as comfortable, as She has Just inform’d me, as can be expected; and has desired me to write a few lines to acquaint you that She is in a good Way, which I am very happy in doing. RC ( Adams Papers ).
The morning after my arrival to this place, I waited on the President with your letter; upon reading of which, he informed me, that he did not think it in his power to give me the place which you so kindly sollicited for me, but assured me he would use his Endeavours to procure some place for me. I then waited upon General Roberdeau and the Massachusetts Delegates, who gave me the same...
I am happy in having it in my power to furnish you with a Copy of Mr. Duche’s Letter, which is inclosed, as also an Extract from the public Ledger of Sept. 10. By the Journals it appears that Mr. Adams has accepted the appointment. The Appointment marks the Wisdom of Congress, and the Acceptation evinces his zeal in “the great and sacred Cause.” Upon those great and important Exertions which...
Mr. Lovell informed me last Evening of your acceptation of the appointment; and also that he should send an express immediately to the Eastward with dispatches, by whom I write. I feel a mixture of joy and grief on this event. As a Patriot, I ought to congratulate my Countrymen upon it, as having thereby a glorious prospect of seeing the liberties of America supported by so able an advocate;...
One day last week a number of british waggoners, who were carrying Cloathing &c. to some of their soldiers in our power, had the honor of being introduced to a goal, for attempting to pass counterfeit money. These waggoners with a number of Serjeants of the enemy, were sent out by Genl: Howe, and permitted to pass by Genl: Washington’s leave. When they arrived at Lancaster, they din’d or took...
Your much esteemed favor came to hand this day, in which you inform me of the departure of your “dearest Friend.” I sincerely wish for your sake it had been convenient and safe for you to have accompanied him: But the danger you mention must, I think, have made the voyage disagreeable and had the event taken place, doubly aggravating on his part.—I can picture to myself the separation and your...
Since I wrote you last, the mystery of blank Dispatches being sent by Capt. Folgier from France has been developed. One Capt. Hinson (who was honored with Dr. Franklin’s confidence) was guilty of the treachery and robbery. Hinson it seems was to have brought the Dispatches if Folgier declined. But when he found that Folgier accepted the trust, he, from his knowledge of the position and, I...
I have just heard a piece of news from Mr. Lovell, which he says comes in a packet lately arrived at New York from England, and which has been published in the New York and Philadelphia papers. It is as follows viz. that the reduction of Genl. Burgoyne has convinced the minister of his weakness in America, and roused the spirit of the nation—that one hundred thousand men are to be raised and...
Since I had the pleasure of addressing you last, I have found in the office a Narrative respecting Count Pulaski, a copy of which is inclosed. He is a great Character. Congress, in confidence of his military skill and prowess, and attachment to the American Cause, have authorised him to raise sixty eight Horse and two hundred Foot. The Horsemen are to be armed with Lancets, and the Foot in the...
I should have done myself the honor of addressing you before this, had I been so fortunate as to have known of opportunities previous to their passing. I have a prospect of sending this soon, and gladly embrace the opportunity. Ld. North’s propositions have occasioned much speculation here. Congress have expressed their opinion of them in their resolutions, which will doubtless have a good...
I have had the pleasure of receiving your agreeable favour of the 9th. of April. I am so exceedingly hurried in copying the Treaties (which are long beyond bounds) that I have had no time to write you fully. Six Copies of the Treaties are wanted, and it falls to me to make them out, as My Companion is absent. Have you done? Have you done? is the Cry every hour of the day. I am almost tired...
I do myself the honor to inclose the postscript to Hall & Sellers’s Paper of the 9th instant containing the message of the undersigned Ambassador of the Court of France to the Court of London; his Majesty’s Speech in Consequence &c. &c. The message is couched in terms very ludicrous and merry. It also speaks tacitly the Power and determination of France. It has chagrined the King and Ministry...
I am happy in informing you, that the Marquiss de La Fayette has safely returned to the Main Camp, after a Brush with a party of the Enemy from the City; in which he had nearly been captivated. I have not learnt all the particulars of the affair; but from the best knowledge I can obtain, I dont find that any thing material did take place, altho’ it had like to have proved a serious matter to...
Your favor of the 21st. and 26th. of May came to hand yesterday. I was exceedingly shocked at the first mention of the capture of the Boston, till I had read the latter part of the paragraph, which related the circumstances. From those circumstances, Madam, I must beg leave to observe, no facts can be collected, and they leave it at least a very dubious, if not an improbable event. She sailed...
Permit me to congratulate you on the safe Arrival of Mr. Adams at France. It is an event that has relieved many of his friends from pain­ ful anxieties. I could have wished for the happiness of communicating the very agreeable intelligence to you. I hope it has reached you before this date. His arrival was taken notice of in the French papers and also in a London paper, which have been...
I had been so short a time in this place when I wrote you last, that it was out of my power to furnish you then with any particulars respecting the enemy’s conduct during their continuance here. By enquiries and observations since, I am enabled to give you some particulars on that head. The City in general has escaped, but houses and fences detached from the Town have felt the wantoness of...
In my letter of the 11th. inst. I mentioned the arrival of the French Ambassador at Chester. I am now to inform you that on the 12th. a Committee of Congress, escorted by a party of light dragoons, waited on him at that place to accompany him to this City. About two o Clock the same day he entered the City. The usual military salutes were paid him by two detached parties that were previously...
Your much esteemed favors of 23d. July and 19th. Augst. came to hand on Monday. Your Letters and the inclosed ones were very acceptable; as they contained agreeable Information. The Letter of June from you and also those from home of the same month mentioned that our Parents were under the operation of a disease, which has swept away it s thousands. Tho’ Art has check’d its malignity, yet...
Your favor of the 26th. Augst. I was honored with last Monday. Just after I had wrote my last to you we had an account here of the action at Rhode Island. I am very happy in its being successful in so great a degree; but will be honest enough to declare that my most pleasing expectations are disappointed. There seemed to be a Certainty almost of a total reduction of the Enemy at that post....
Since the date of that letter mentioning my not having recieved any intelligence from home for more then two months, I have had the honor of four or five letters from you and two or three from home. Your favor of the 2d. inst. came to hand yesterday. My situation is such at present, that it will by no means answer for me to reside here. Boarding, at almost the cheapest rate, is 16 dollars per...
The Reason of our being in Spain, you will, perhaps, be no stranger to, when this reaches You. I am not sorry We arrived at Ferrol, as a prosecution of our Voyage might have been attended with hazard. A leaky Ship in a Storm or violent Gale, is not a Situation for very comfortable Sensations. We had Leaks, Storms and Winds in the passage. The former were more formidable than the latter, and...
This Afternoon I visited one of the Churches in this place; and casting my Eyes into one Corner of it I spy’d one of the Monks of the Franciscan Order, laid out in a Case, with his Robes on, his Head reclined upon a Pillar, his Hands and Fingers embracing each other, and between his Thumbs a Cross. Around the Corpse was eight Candles, four of their largest Sort and four of the common. There...
After twenty odd days spent in climbing Mountains, sinking into Valleys, tumbling over Rocks, pocking thro’ Mud and Mire, creeping along Plains, oversetting of Carriages &c., to the End of the Chapter of Evils, We arrived at this place. In addition to the above Combination of Evils, We had smoaky, scolding, dirty Inns to put up at. Cleanliness is a moral Virtue undoubtedly , but very little...
On the ninth of this Month We all happily arrived here, and with Hearts replete with Gratitude. Our Journey was long, cold, tedious and painful to an extream degree. After being fortunately delivered from a crazy and leaky Ship, We had conjectured our future Enterprises would be less irksome. Our Consolation and Triumph upon the Occasion terminated almost as soon as they existed. We had hardly...
On Monday Morning I had the Honor to go with his Excellency and Mr. D ana to breakfast with the celebrated Abbè Reynald, in Com­ pany with a large Collection of Nobility and Gentry of both Sexes. In opening upon this Company, (which was unexpected to poor me) I felt all that irksome Discomposure and painful Confusion, which so respectable an Assembly of Strangers could produce in one...
That a Nation once distinguished in the Annals of Mankind, should by the Pride, Avarice, Ambition, Injustice and Oppression of its Governors, loose its distant Dependencies, is not an uncommon Event in the History of the World; but that the same Nation, from the Operation of the same Causes, together with Folly and Madness, should league one half the World against her, is not only a Phenomenon...
On the 10th. of this Month I had the pleasure of recieving Letters from Hingham dated in February, which informed me of the Health of all Friends at both my dear Homes. They contain the first News I have recieved of the Kind. They gave me Relief from a Burden of Anxiety I had been under respecting the Severity of the Winter there. I have also Letters from Braintree, which inform me, that a...
I was made happy this day by the Receipt of your esteemed favor of the 2d. of March. You say, that in the seperation of near Friends, You have ever thought the person left at Home the greatest Sufferer, and that anticipated Evils have often as much Power over the Mind as real ones. This Observation is the Result of that extream Sensibility of which You are possessed, and which has been but too...
About a fortnight since Mr. Hutchinson, formerly Governor of the Massachusetts Bay, dropped down dead in England. The Reflection made by some one in the English Papers is this. “Governor Hutchinson is now no more. On Saturday afternoon he dropped down dead. It is charitable to hope, that his Sins may be buried with him in the Tomb, but they must be recorded in his Epitaph. His...
Since Mr. Appleton left Us, the inclosed Letters came to hand with a packet of Newspapers as late as the middle of May. The Letter signed Portia came in the State that You will receive it in; it was under a Cover superscribed by I. Smith Esqr. In the Letter were two bills of Exchange on the Minister at this Court, one of eighteen dollars and the other of sixty, which Mr. D ana will present to...
I have the pleasure of informing You, that Mr. Dana this day recieved a letter from Mr. A dams of the 17th. of this Month, who was well with his two Sons at Amsterdam. He thinks the Air of the Low Countries not so salubrious as that of France. They have too many Canals and too much stagnant Water there to make it the most healthy Spot in the World: The Air and Climate of this Country are...
Your favor from Brussells was duly recieved, and ought to have been acknowledged before this. By the size of your Packet that came to hand this day, I concluded that it contained a particular description of your Travels, of the Curiosities you had met with &c., but upon opening it I found one line of request, and another (truly laconic) hinting at my neglect in writing. If You had been kind...
By yesterday’s post from Nantes Mr. Austin recieved a Letter from Mr. Williams, informing him that a french Vessel had just arrived there from Philadelphia, the Captain of which reports that Kniphausen had been repulsed in the Jerseys—that besides the killed and wounded, there were seven hundred prisoners taken, which he saw in Philadelphia—that the Militia on this occasion behaved with great...
I was this day honoured with your favour of the 30th. of last Month. I cannot give a fuller answer to your question respecting President Laurens, than the following Extract from Mr. Jay’s Letter to Mr. Dana, dated at Madrid the 19th. of August. “As to Col. Laurens, I have heard nothing of him except as follows. Captain Bryan of the Schooner Peggy arrived at Cadiz the 18th of July in forty nine...
I had the pleasure of your agreeable favour of the 31st. of August this day, and am much obliged by the Continuation of your Journal. You have refreshed my Memory encore. I acknowledge my Engagements, and think I have in part fulfilled them. You have I am persuaded recieved my first before this. The portions of your Journal are very short, but nevertheless choice and well written—was You to...
I was honoured with your favour of the eighth Instant on the fifteenth. So general an Approbation of the Constitution of the Massachusetts is an Event of great Importance to our State, and it’s Acceptance at this juncture affords an unequivocal proof of the Wisdom and Magninimity, Concord and Unanimity of its Inhabitants. I rejoice that I am to live under a Constitution of Government, that has...
A few days since I had the honor of a letter from Mr. A., who I have the pleasure to inform You is well with his two Sons. Mr. Dana is gone also to Amsterdam—he left Paris the 12th instant. What his Object is I know not—his determination was sudden and unexpected, and occasioned by the Arrival of Mr. Searle, but this by the bye. I am left here of Course a miserable, solitary lonely Being,...
This Evening Capt. Simeon Sampson of the State Ship Mars of 20 Guns arrived here, and delivered me a large Budget of Letters for You and Mr. Dana. According to your direction, I opened your’s, and read them excepting Mrs. A dams’ which I had no business to read. Postage for her Letters you will never think dear, I therefore have forwarded them with the highest satisfaction. I have the honor of...
I had the honor yesterday of a most excellent letter under the signature of Portia dated 21st. July; and altho’ I wrote You largely but yesterday, yet it would be unpardonable to omit the earliest opportunity of most gratefully acknowledging the receipt of a letter, which from its Morality, its refined Sentiments and its Patriotism does infinite honour to the Writer. I have read with the...
We arrived here last Evening at six oClock. This Morning We have a Sky and Air truly in the American Style. We have been to a Lecture, where many curious Experiments were made by the Professor of Medicine Mr. Horne. At four Clock We go to a Law Lecture. I have engaged two Rooms at fifteen Guilders per Month, in the same Lodgings with Mr. Waterhouse, whom I find very polite and attentive. On...
I had the Honour of your favour of the 20th this Morning. I am happy to hear that your Eyes are better. Altho’ I have not as yet been able to obtain a Master for the Children, yet they are pursuing their Studies. The Master that is recommended is said to be the best in the place, and has a happy Faculty in teaching the Languages. The Vacancy begins to day and lasts for three Weeks. The...
I had the Honour of your favour of the 24th. instant this morning. The Master has been here twice this day and given for the first time Lessons in Greek and Latin to the Young Gentlemen. I am happy that they have begun. Their Instructor appears to be well acquainted with his Business, and to proceed with great Judgment. The Greek Grammar is one of his own Composition, and at present in Manu­...
I have the Honour to inclose You “Les fondemons de la Jurisprudence Naturelle” by Professor Pestel. It was originally wrote in Latin; but the french Translation is allowed even by the Professor himself to be well executed. If You prefer the Original, I will purchase and forward it to You. The Young Gentlemen have been very steadily employed since they have had an Instructor, and their...
I had the Honour of your Note and the inclosed Extracts yesterday Morning; I waited on Mr. Luzac immediately with the Paper and shewed him the Extracts, with which he was highly gratified. He sent them so late last Evening that I had only time to inclose them to You. The News cannot but be agreable to every one who loves his Country, and feels interested in every Event that affects it: but the...
Your favour of yesterday was recieved this morning. I suspect it was opened before it came to my hands. The Seal appeared to have been good at first, but when delivered to me, it the Impression was very faint in many places—perhaps it may be accidental. The Hymn to Ceres was forgotten at the time that I inclosed the fundamenta Jurisprudentiae Nat:—I shall send it by this Opportunity. I shall...
I have waited on Mr. Luzac with the Crisis, who is much obliged to You for it, and will either translate it into Dutch or French, as shall be most agreable to You, and as soon as possible. You will be so good as to acquaint me, which of the two Languages is your Choice. I waited a few days agone on the Rector Magnificus with Charley, and was informed by him, that his Matriculation was...