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At the last Term of the Supreme Judicial Court held at Ipswich came upon Trial the Celebrated Cause of John Murray vs the Inhabitants of Gloucester— (This Murray is known by the Name of Salvation Murray, to contradistinguish him from another of the same Name, who preaches a very opposite Doctrine, and is known by the Name of Damnation Murray.) M r. Murray about a twelvemonth agone brought an...
I had a few days since the pleasure of your favor of the 20th. of March last. Your reproofs are always accompanied with so much delicacy, that the reproved forget the Censor in the Friend. I confess I have been strangely inattentive to my friends on your Side of the Atlantic, and that I am entitled to a large Share of their Remembrance. ’Tis but an indifferent Apology to say, that I seldom...
The time of M rs— A s. departure draws so near, & the Conveyance is so unexceptionable, that I can hardly be excused from forwarding a few Lines.— I wish it was in my power to write you a particular state of our public Affairs; but my life for six months past has been so recluse, and I have seen so few Persons from whom certain Information could be obtained, that you must not expect any very...
’Tis two Months this day since I arrived at New York— I delivered the Treaty & Dispatches on the 22 d. Nov r. to General Mifflin, the President of Congress, then at Philadelphia— One delay & another prevented my reaching home ’till the middle of December— I am ashamed that I have omitted writing so long—but Visits & Sickness have prevented.— M r. Gerry wrote you so largely upon the general...
I have this moment received your polite Invitation to dinner tomorrow, and am extremely sorry, that a severe Cold, which has confined me a day or two to the House, prevents my accepting it. I had engaged to dine in Company tomorrow if well enough, but could easily set aside the Engagement, if nothing else but that prevented. I should be very happy to see Mr. Shaw, and if I have not that...
I expected at this date to have been at Sea; but the violent Winds from the West & N. West render it absolutely impossible to leave the Port. The Vessel that is to carry me is completely fitted & ready, & has been so ever since the 19 th. instant, she having been prepared in thirty six hours after my Arrival— I am infinitely indebted to the Zeal & Activity of Mons r. Thevenard, who has done...
I arrived here this Morning at about eleven o. Clock, and to my great disappointment found the Packet Boat had sailed four hours before my Arrival— She had been detained two days for me, altho’ the Wind was very favorable. I am exceedingly chagrined & mortified, tho’ I have nothing to reproach myself with; & I flatter myself the Ministers for Peace will acquit me of having made any unnecessary...
On Saturday last M r. W m. Smith (Son of I. Smith Esq r of Boston) arrived in Town— He left Boston 7 th. July, & all friends were then well— He has brought several Letters for you, which I think prudent to keep, ’till a private hand offers— The Letters from M rs. A. M r. Cranch & D r. T. of Weymouth, I have not opened, as I knew the hand writing— In opening a large packet, for you I found four...
The affair of surrounding the State House at Philadelphia terminated very differently from the expectations of our Enemies of all denominations— The Troops employed in this contemptuous daring Attack on the Civil Power have humbly solicited the forgiveness of Congress, while two of their Officers, the Ringleaders, have fled for safety to the Asylum of two of our choice Friends , D. & A.— They...
I arrived here last Evening with M r. Laurens & Son, M r. Barclay, Storer & Champion— We came off Pool in Capt Barney, who left Havre de Grace on Friday last— Having luckily fell in with a Pilot Boat, & the Wind being good for Barney, we went on board the Pilot Boat & landed at Pool, M r. Laurens thinking it most adviseable that Capt. Barney should improve the good Wind—so that he may be said...
M r. Laurens & Son arrived here last Evening from Paris— I waited upon them immediately, and learnt that they were going over to England as soon as M r. Barclay should arrive, which will be to day, in all probability, as he left Paris the 29 th. instant. Capt Barney, it seems, is directed to give M r. Laurens a Passage to Portsmouth, which is but a short run from hence— M r. Laurens will, upon...
Mr. Adams having taken a Journey to Holland for three or four Weeks, and there being nothing of consequence to do in his Absence, Mr. Storer and myself thought it an exceeding good opportunity of executing our Project of a Voyage to this place, for the sake of the Sea Bath. We arrived here on the 27th. instant, after a delightfully fatiguing Journey. We passed thro’ the Province of Normandy,...
M r. Storer and myself arrived here this morning, after a very fatiguing Journey; tho’ I am apprehensive much less so than your’s, considering the extreme heats— Normandy is, I believe unequalled in the Riches of its Soil— Grains of all kinds in vast abundance cover an extensive Country— We saw also charming fields of Clover and Honey Suckle, such as would have delighted your Eyes— But...
It would give me great Satisfaction to have it in my power to reply to any Letter from you since October last. But that pleasure is denied me. I feel that I am deprived of one Source of Instruction and Entertainment, in being deprived of your excellent Letters. And I support the Privation with little Philosophy. I am thoroughly tired of this cold Consolation, “wait with Patience.” Tis...
I have had the pleasure of recieving your favor of the 20th. instant. With regard to the Miniature of Genl. Washington, which Mr. D ana requested You to enquire about, I have only to say, that Mr. D. has been fully informed of the Reasons of the Delay in not sending it. Mr. Dumas can give You the whole History of the Affair, as he was so kind as to undertake the Expedition of it to...
For about three Weeks in the Time of Lent, the Play Houses are shut up, on account of its being a Season for the Care (not Cure ) of Souls. To a City so much accustomed to Amusements as Paris, this is a Time of Mourning and Sadness. Horse racing and Bull baiting have been invented to fill up a part of this Interval of Sorrow. But what is called the Fête des longs Champs, or long Fields, is the...
Peace seems to have closed all Communication with America. ’Tis a very long time since any Vessels or Letters have arrived either in France or Holland. We cannot account for this Circumstance, but upon the Supposition, that News had reached America of Negociations for Peace being opened, and that while this Business was pending the Merchant prefered a State of Inactivity to putting any thing...
In acknowledging the receipt of your kind favor of 26th. October and in confessing it was accompanied with five or six other Letters, which arrived yesterday, You will naturally conclude, that a rash Declaration made in my Letter of 22d. instant, of not writing again to my Friends, ought to be recanted. I do not hesitate a moment to make a formal Recantation, and would repeat it twenty times...
I little expected, when writing to You on the 16th. instant, to have so soon congratulated You upon the Signature of the Preliminaries of Peace between France, Spain and England, and upon a Signature of an Armistice by the Ministers of those three Powers together with those of America . This Business was accomplished on the 20th. instant at Versailles, and is the Occasion of my addressing...
About three weeks agone, I forwarded a packet of Letters to Mr. Cranch, inclosing one to him—the first since I have been in Europe, that I ever transmitted to America without a line to your Ladyship. I must confess the packet seemed incomplete—a want of time rendered it so. I am persuaded that my Punishment will far surpass your disappointment. However to avoid a similar Misfortune again, I...
I intended to have wrote largely by this Opportunity, but have been confined ever since last Sunday night to my Bed and Chamber, with a most violent Cold, a kind of Punishment for Pride and Curiosity. I was last Sunday at Versailles, the day was extremely cold and foggy, much was to be seen, and but little time for the purpose. I drove about without Hat and with thin Shoes all day long, gave...
You will believe me, when I inform You, that I am grievously disappointed in only having to acknowledge the reciept of just two Lines and an half from You by Capt. Grinnell. I am sorry that the Shortness of your Notice has deprived me of so much Happiness. The Card however will keep alive my Expectations ’till the promised Letters arrive. But lest Miss Nabby should think I set no Value upon...
In my melancholy, unhappy Moments, (for such I sometimes have), I recur to my old Letters for Consolation, and to none with more pleasure than the sentimental ones of Portia. Letters give Wings to the Imagination; and by their Aid I can transport myself in an instant to H ingha m, or B rai n tr ee and there enjoy the Company of my Friends. In reading over again your’s of the 18th. July last, I...
I forwarded a Letter to You, Madam, yesterday by Capt. Barney, Commander of the Packet Washington, and this I expect will go by the Cicero, Capt. Hill. Have the Vessels done passing between Boston and Europe? I have received no Letters a long time from home, and I begin to grow a little impatient, especially since I have heard of my Father’s Misfortune. I have a half Story about the Matter,...
We arrived here the 26th. last Month after a tedious Journey in a crazy Carriage, with the additional Circumstances and Douceurs of constant Rains and bad Roads. Nothing however compared to Spain. At Valenciennes, the first City of France in coming from Holland, we stopped half a day. The greatest Curiosity we saw there was in a Church, where we found the Virgin Mary encirling the City with a...
I am thus far advanced on my Journey, and shall continue it from hence tomorrow. I found Mr. Storer writing to You as I came in, and he has consented to inclosing a few lines in his. Your letter of 5th. Septr. to Mr. A. has duly come to hand. You express a strong desire to make a Voyage to your dearest Friend. I am not surprized at that, and think your Patience and Sacrifices are perfect...
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In receiving the Communication, that the T reaty of Amity and Commerce between the United States of America, and the seven United Provinces, was yesterday signed , You will at the same Time accept my sincere Congratulations upon this Event. It has been a long, tedious and troublesome Negotiation, and fortunately for our Country in very good Hands. Every Negotiation here takes up so much Time,...
What pleasing Sensations does a Packet from the other side of the Atlantic produce? Every part of the human frame sympathizes and is in Unison. This Truth I have most sensibly felt this day, in recieving three Letters from America. I was at Peace with myself before I opened them. The Superscriptions, in informing me from whence they came, saved me a Turn of the Fever, which threatened before....
I am to express my Acknowledgments to You for your kind favor of the 17th. June last, with which I was honoured this day. I expressed my Chagrin in not recieving a Letter by the Firebrand in mine of the 27th. July, which accompanies this. Little did I think that in that moment the tender sympathetic Heart of Portia was sharing, and participating in the Cares and Agonies of her dear Sister, who...
Yours of 22d ulto. arrived a few days agone. I acknowledge myself much in Arrears, tho’ I have by no means forgotten you. For three Months past I have been miserably tormented with the Tertian Ague, and have been a more useless being than common. However I hope the Game is nearly up at present. I had no Idea that your Climate was so bad—but you must remember that this has been an uncommon...
Soon after writing You at Amsterdam, I was unfortunate enough to have a Relapse, after I thought that the Fever had entirely quitted me. I was confined there about a fortnight, and then came to this place. I am at present perfectly recovered I hope—for another Turn would fret me out of Existence, which would be no great loss except to my “fair American,” who might whimper and sigh a day or two...
Between 6 and 7 this morning Capt. Trowbridge came and delivered me the five Letters and News Papers inclosed. Every thing in a quiet state on the other side the Water—Provissions plenty and cheap—hard Money not scarce. He has brought Tobacco, and Sugar and Coffee from Boston . Sugar and Coffee from Boston to Amsterdam, is a Phenomenon in the mercantile World, and ought not to be forgotten. If...
You will doubtless be surprized to recieve another Letter from me dated from hence, and I fully expected to have been at the Hague several days agone when I wrote last, but the prospect of Mr. Barclay’s Company, the kindness and Attention of my Countrymen here and a daily Increase of Health and Strength have hitherto prevented. I intended returning to day in the Chariot de Poste, but I did not...
Since my last an important Revolution has taken place here respecting our Country. A formal Acknowledgment of our Sovereignty and Independence in the Admission and Reception of your dearest Friend is what I allude to. But You will have heard of the Event long before this reaches You, with many of its Circumstances. At present I am too feeble to enter into a detail of Matters, being upon my...
We have made a serious Beginning this morning, and have already completed the packing of the Books, and shall finish packing to night I hope the Decanters, Wine Glasses, and China. The looking Glasses will require Time and Care, as well as the great Cabinet. We shall be ready to load Thursday Morning, perhaps Wednesday Afternoon, not later however than Thursday. I find the Eye can pack much...
I have sent to Mr. Hodshon since your Departure to send the Packer, but he cannot come ’till Monday, which I suspected as this is a busy day all over the World. As soon as he comes on Monday, I will set him to work and give all the Assistance that depends on me. There is between twenty and thirty Tons of Turf, and a few Bushels of Coal, which Stephens seems very desirous of having. He does not...
I was duly honor’d with your favor of the 20th, and its Contents gave me sincere pleasure, and its Injunctions shall be observed. Mr. J. Van Staphorst has called upon me this Afternoon, and acquainted me with his great distress respecting the House engaged for the Loan: that the Man is an Anglomane or at least very lately converted: that he has within these six Weeks indulged himself in very...
I have the honor to congratulate You on the final Resolution of the Generality, the News of which I received last Evening. This Step makes an agreable Impression here, and they pride themselves in the Unanimity and Rapidity , and I may add Velocity with which it has been carried thro’. It will indeed make a memorable Epocha in the Annals of this Country, and stand as an eternal Monument that...
Your favor of the 9th. of December last informs me of the Arrival of the Apollo, Minerva, and Juno, three of fabulous Divinity who know nothing of me You observe. I do not wish to altercate even with Gods, much less with Goddesses: but I have a Right to quarrel with the Destinies, or bad Men, and there is but little benefit, I fear, arising from Contests of this kind. What am I to do with such...
J’ai bien-recu les Lettres que vous m’avez fait l’honneur de m’ecrire de Francfort et de Berlin. Votre Lettre de St. Petersbourg sous la date de 8/19 7bre. est aussi parvenue. Je vous suis très obligé pour toutes les trois. J’ai été fort content de vos observations sur le Caractere, les manieres et les coutumes des Peuples de ces pays dans lequels vous avez voyagé: et je vous prie de vouloir...
By the last Mails came the King’s Speech, the Address of the two Houses in answer, and the debates in Parliament. His most gracious Majesty is sorry, that the Americans and French have catched one of his flying Generals with an Army, because the Rectitude of his Cause entitled him to better luck. He tells his Parliament the Rebellion is still fomented, and that his Subjects continue in that...
’Tis a pleasing Reflexion to one absent, that his Correspondence with his friends meets with no untoward Accidents, even though the subject matter of his Scralls should be in a stile little interesting or entertaining. But I am deprived of even this satisfaction, for almost all my Letters are on board the Indian. It is needless for me to add an Apology after this, especially as Newman, Brown,...
I had the honour of your favor without date this morning. I have a particular Satisfaction in assuring you, Sir, that the health of Mr. Adams has greatly recovered. I have shewn him your Letters. He is much obliged by your Kind attention, and has charged me to present you his Respects, and to inform you, that he should be very happy to See Mr. Dumas at Amsterdam, whenever it Shall be...
I have the honor to acquaint your Excellency, that Mr. Adams has for sometime past been confined to his Bed with a Fever; and tho’ at present upon his Recovery, yet is still too feeble to write. He has therefore directed me to acknowledge the Receipt of your Excellency’s two Letters of 14th. and 21st. July to the Honorable Mr. Searle, who sailed about a month since in the South Carolina,...
I had the honor of your favor of yesterday’s date this morning. I blush to aknowledge that I have not given you a more early Intimation of Mr. Adams’s Return from Paris: but I hope you will pardon it. Mr. Adams has had a very severe nervous Fever, and is now recov­ ering, but still too weak to see company, he has charged me to present his compliments to you, and to acquaint you, that altho’ he...
I am almost ashamed to intrude another Letter by this Conveyance, which, if it should prove a safe one, will throw into your hands an Abundance of trumpery from me, sufficient for one Year. Accept my thanks, Madam, for your Goodness in forwarding my Sister’s Letter to me. I feel myself much obliged by your kind attention to me in this way, and particularly for not reading the Letter which You...
I have the honor to acquaint your Excellency, that Mr. Adams has been much indisposed for three weeks past with the fever of this Country, and is now so ill with it as to be confined to his Bed, and unable to write. In a few days however it is probable that the Violence of the Fever will abate. In the meantime, he has desired me to advise your Excellency that he has recieved Information, that...
I was yesterday honoured with a Letter from Braintree dated the 25th of May last, and tho’ an anonymous one, yet the hand writing, connected with other Circumstances, warranted my subjoining the Signature of the amiable and accomplished Daughter of one of the first Ladies of the Age, to whose Goodness added to your Politeness I am indebted for this mark of Attention. I have embraced the first...
Ten months have I been waiting for an opportunity to forward my Letters, but none has presented, which of Course leaves an immense budget of Trumpery on hand. I know not whether to continue writing or begin burning. You will find by the inclosed Gazette Madam, an Account of our Celebration of the Anniversary of Independence. Every thing was conducted with the utmost order and decency—in one...