You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Taylor, John
  • Recipient

    • Jefferson, Thomas

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Taylor, John" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 1-24 of 24 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
It gives me great uneasyness that the Militia of this County By their riotous behavour have prevented my making a proper return to you. On the day appointed for the Draft they assembled in a Mob, and disarm’d the Officers as they came to the field, and took from me the papers relative to the draft which prevented my carrying it on. I had a Court Martial held according to Law, and many were...
Lancaster County, 15 Apr. 1781 . Encloses “a list of the number of Men raised in this County for recruiting this States quota of Troops to serve in the Continental Army, likewise a particular number of each Division, and a return of the Militia but not so full as your last instructions required, as I have not recieved any returns from the Different Captains since.” The return of ammunition...
Your most Curious Council is required on the following Cases. Case the 1st. Adam Wayland of Culpeper County in the Virga. State, after 1st. Lawful Marriage had 6 Children by his wife and She pregnant with the 7th.—Made a Will by which will he bequeath’d his wife one full Third part of his Estate, his wife in time of her pregnancy was Taken with the Small pox and Died—after remaining a widower...
Your letter dated one month past, was delivered to me, as I was about to leave philadelphia, and this circumstance defered my answer hitherto. It was my purpose previously to have seen Mr: Martin, who is the inventor of the drilling machine , the simplicity of which is its best recommendation; but a succession of heavy rains have swept off our mills and bridges, and left a gulf between Mr:...
Some time past, I inclosed you the pamphlet you wrote for—accepted of your commission to procure the drill plow—and requested to know to whom at Richmond I should forward it. The plow has been ready for some time and delayed for want of an answer. Concluding at length, that my letter, or your reply has failed, I have forwarded it herewith to the care of Mr: John Harvie at Richmond, and...
There is a spice of fanaticism in my nature upon two subjects—agriculture and republicanism, which all who set it in motion, are sure to suffer by. Tho’ there is no comfort, there is a warning in the confession, enabling you at this moment to escape from its effect. For I am about to go farther into the means which I have practised for the recovery of worn out lands, the experiments I have...
A model of Martin’s machine for seperating the grain of wheat from the straw, is now before me, and yet simple as it is, I have no hopes that my mechanical knowledge is equal to a description so perspicuous, as to enable you to erect one. For it probably bears a very distant analogy to the Scotch machine or to Booker’s, neither of which had ever been seen by Mr: Martin, when he invented his....
Herewith I have forwarded to you the drill you requested, packed into a crate basket, in a secure manner. This machine is an improvement upon that heretofore sent you, in having cups cut into iron rollers, instead of being fixed to bands. The effect, is perfect regularity in the sheding of the grain, because no change will be produced by the quantity in the box—because these cups must fill...
Mr: Martin, for whom I solicited you to obtain a patent for a thrashing machine, has made several important improvements upon the model forwarded to you, and therefore wishes the taking out of a patent may be postponed, until his application can be so amended, as that it may include these improvements. For this End I will very shortly take the liberty of inclosing you the proper papers,...
I now take the liberty of inclosing you the papers accompanied with a drawing to obtain Mr: Martin’s patent , having by a reference to the law, discovered the error in having before omited this drawing. Mr: Martin wishes the former papers to be withdrawn or to remain unnoticed, not only on account of this error, but also because several essential improvements have been added by him, since the...
Having removed to some distance from Mr: Martin’s, his consideration of your letter of the 6th. of April, and the drawing it covered, has been somewhat delayed. He says, as indeed you will discover, that his amended machine, of which a drawing was lately sent you, has anticipated several of your objections, by having dispensed with the screw, and some of the wheels—that he had in the course of...
The observations contained in yours of the 4th. instant, upon my letter to Colo. New, induce me to say something respecting our political situation, explanatory of one idea in that letter, of which you evidently disapprove. Convinced of the caution imposed on you by the malevolence of party, I have forborne the liberty I am now about to take; but considering your interrogations as permissive,...
It would be happy indeed for us, if agriculture and farming still continued to be interesting subjects—but alas! can we, when our house is on fire, be solicitous to save the kittens? How long is it to burn, or will it ever be extinguished? I would be almost content to save a single apartment. If a sufficient spirit had appeared in our legislature, it was my project, by law, to declare the...
Your letter concerning a successor to Mr. Tazewell , took the rout to Richmond, and found me at home a few days past, for the assembly had risen before its arrival. It was my wish to have tried Colo. M. against Wood at the last session, of which I informed Colo . Nicholas previous to its meeting, but it was prevented by a doubt of success. This however would have been a pledge for my exertions...
I herewith send you the Swedish turnip seed promised. This species of turnip seems to me to require earlier sowing than the common kind, to be drilled and cultivated. Accept the highest esteem and respect, of, Sir, yr: mo: obt. St. ViU .
If this letter should be improper; its apology is, that no evil design suggested it. An idea is circulated, that after the expiration of the next presidential term, you purpose to decline a re-election. As one of your constituents; as one of your friends; I am about to inform you of its reception within the compass of my observation, and to add several remarks as to its propriety. The...
Your letter of June the 22d. only reached me this day; being directed “near the Bowling Green” it has slept in that post office; for I now live 17 miles from it, near Port Royal. Immediately on receiving your first letter, I applied to Mr. Martin to make a drill for you, and my instances have been often repeated. His inclination to comply was strong and he promised it. The difficulty was to...
I have this moment been informed by Mr: Martin, that he has at length found a workman capable of executing the drill, and he expresses an anxiety to furnish you with it. He is however apprehensive that the long delay, and the disappointment of your wish to have it in time to be sent by the vessel you mentioned, may have altered your disposition to have it made at all. Be pleased to drop me a...
Several opinions, in relation to the present aspect of publick affairs, have long pressed on my mind; to publish them might be pernicious and to suppress them, criminal; The badness of my judgment and information, suggests the first apprehension, and the possibility nevertheless of their containing some useful hint, the second; to satisfy both; and recollecting that common soldiers have aided...
A bad state of health, the diagnostick of which evidently is, that I must ’ere long shake hands with time, has compelled me to postpone an acknowledgment of the pleasure I reaped from yours of May last, to an interval of temporary convalescence. And give me leave to Say, that no Small portion of this pleasure, was derived from the absence of any indication of old age or instability of hand, in...
I hope you will excuse the liberty I am about to take, when I assure you that I have no other means of effecting my object. Is the family of the late Col o Wilson C. Nicholas in destitute circumstances? Did he leave sons whose educations are unfinished? Would a contribution, if such is the case, of one hundred and twenty five dollars dollars annually for four years be beneficial to them? Would...
Nothing can be better, nor more conformable to my wishes, than the mode you mention of learning the wants of Col o Nicholas’s family, and the application of the small sum destined towards their alleviation; and I thankfully agree to it—You will therefore be so good as to add to the obligation, by informing me, in which of the banks at Fredericksburg the money shall be lodged, or whether it...
When I first wrote to you on the private subject, I supposed that Col o Nicholas had left at least one young son, and that it would be better to pay $125 annually towards his education, than a larger sum at once. upon learning from you the state of the family, it now seems to me that $500 contributed at once, will probably do them more good than the four annual advances. In a former letter you...
I am constrained to write you this letter, by having seen in the news papers an extract of a letter, said to be written by you, approving of construction construction; to assure you that I had never seen nor heard of your letter, if it is genuine, before I saw it in a news paper. Recently I inclosed you a draft on the bank of Virginia at Richmond to be applied at your discretion as before...