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Did not the hurry of our affairs prevent; I Should often write you Respecting the State of our Army: but it has been my fortune to be Employed almost night and Day. When I had Winter Hill almost Compleated I was ordered to Plowed Hill where for a Long Time I was almost Day and night in Fortifying. Since have I been ordered to the Eastward to fortify and Defend Pescataway Harbour but...
Your very Acceptable Favour of the 7th Instant Came to hand this Day. You could not have Conferred a greater obligation on me than by giving yourself the Trouble to write me; but when you give me to understand that my Services are acceptable in Your Eyes and in the Eyes of the Congress in General I already Esteem myself fully rewarded for all my toils; and cannot but persevere in my Endeavours...
I had the pleasure of receiving your agreeable favour of the 15th ultimo. I Delayed answering it till I could give you information how matters were Like to go in this City. Soon after I received your Letter I Sent for Colo. Sears Mr. John Smith and Some others (which I knew to be Staunch) to Spend An Evening with me that I might Converse with them upon the Subject. I was Some what at a Loss to...
I hope you will pardon me for not writing to you oftner of the state off affairs in the army of our Victories and Defeats Advances and Retreats but I have many things to Alledge in Excuse. I don’t Recollect that I am a Letter in Debt to you as I think I have punctually answered yours. I have ever been so full of Business that I could find no time to write but still I have a more weighty Reason...
I Recollect That I Stand Indebted to you one Letter for your favor of the 22d. Feby and have nothing to plead in Excuse for nonpayment but want of Ability. I had Just before I was honoured with your Letter received a Fall from my Horse which Disabled me from writing. I Soon after went to the Eastward and did not return till the 15th Instant. Since which I have been much Engaged in getting...
You cant oblidge me more than by giving me a Line to Inform whether you are, or are not alive ; I begin to grow Suspicions and am therefore uneasy. I Should be Exceeding unhappy if you were to Steal a march upon me During the present Contest. I am Determined to See it out. I wrote a Line beging your opinion upon Some Points but (Like Saul in Distress) I can get no answer. I fear Therefore...
Far from addressing you in The Language of friendship and Desiring your assistance as a Friend I call upon you as a friend to Justice and mankind begging you to Acquaint yourself and make Congress acquainted with the Evidence I have Inclosed The President Relative to my Conduct. They ought to take time to view Examine and Consider it. They have Censured and Condemned me without Evidence will...
Nothing has given me more uneasiness than to find General Conway is about Leaving our Army on Account of Some French Gentlemen who were inferiour in Rank to him while they Remained in their own Country being promoted over him. This he Says was the only Thing he guarded against in his agreement with Mr. Dean and with Congress, but is now So unhappy as to find not only persons who held Inferiour...
I this morning was favoured with yours of the 28 ultimo, which gave the more pleasure as I before had began to Conceive that Some part of my Conduct of which I was ignorant had Lost me your friendship and Esteem. This Sir was founded on my not Receiving a Single Line from you to Notify me of the Repeated Storms that were Raised against me in Congress. I Ever have and yet do most Sincerely wish...
[ September 20, 1777. On September 21, 1777, Hamilton and Laurens wrote to Sullivan : “We have just received your favour of Yesterday.” Letter not found .] Laurens, like H, was an aide-de-camp of Washington. A native of South Carolina and the son of Henry Laurens, John Laurens was H’s closest friend in Washington’s official family.
[ Easton, Pennsylvania, May 19, 1779. On May 20, 1779, Hamilton wrote to Sullivan , “I have received your favour of yesterday.” Letter not found. ]
I have Examined into the State of The Ammunition in my Department & find Remaining in the Magazine of the Powder Supplied from New Hampshire 19 Barrels of 100 wt Each, Scarcely any Balls & no flints Except what the Soldiers are possessd of: They are in General well Provided with amunition for one Ingagement we have 50 Rounds of Cartridges to Each Cannon That is mounted which is all the...
Letter not found: from John Sullivan, 3 Sept. 1775. On 4 Sept. GW wrote to Sullivan : “I receivd your Letter of yesterday.”
I have Reviewed the Palefaced Corps in my Brigade & find The Persons named in the Inclosed List Totally unfit for Duty at present have been So for a Long time & are Likely to Remain So During this Campaign Except Those to whose names I had added a Quere whose Disorders may possibly be Removed before the End of this Campaign with respect to those your Excellencey will act as your wisdom Shall...
I arrived here in about twenty four hours after I Left you have Collected Powder So as to make up near thirty Barrels & have Since been preparing to Set an Example to the other Seaports by Setting the Fleet at Defiance upon my arrival I was Surprized to find that the Boom So much Talked of was not prepared That the Bridge Intended for Crossing from the main to the Island whereon Stands the...
Winter Hill , 29 November 1775 . Recommends discharge for Ens. Zebulon Drew, who “has been for a Long Time Troubled with a painful Disorder which not only prevents him from Doing Duty at present but renders it impossible for him to do any further Service during the Campaign & very Improbable whether he will Ever be able to Serve in the field in future.” ALS , DLC:GW . Zebulon Drew, an ensign...
agreeable to your order have again waited on Major Rogers and Strictly Examined him have Seen his Several permits and think them Genuine & in Every Respect agreeable to the Copy Sent you —he Says he Left New york about the 10th of October and being ill with the Fever & ague was 10 Days in getting to Abany That There & at a place Called Stone Rabba—he Tarried 10 Days More: he then passed...
Letter not found: from Brigadier General John Sullivan, 22 Jan. 1776. On 23 Jan. Robert Hanson Harrison wrote to Sullivan: “I have it in command from his Excellency to inform you, that General Gates handed him your letter of the 22 inst.” ( DLC : Peter Force Collection). For the full text of Harrison’s letter to Sullivan of 23 Jan., see GW to Sullivan, 28 Jan. 1776 , source note.
Letter not found: from Brigadier General John Sullivan, 9 Feb. 1776. On this date Robert Hanson Harrison wrote to Sullivan: “I am commanded by his Excellency to acknowledge the receipt of your favour of this Evening, and to Inform you, that he would not wish an Attempt to be made to bring off the Guard which you mention, ’till he has seen you, for particular reasons which he will then...
In Obedience to Your Excellency’s Orders, we have considered the Matters referred to Us, & beg leave to recommend the following Signals to be given from Roxbury, in Case of any Movement of The Enemy to Distress our People at Dorchester Hill: Signal in Case the Enemy begin to Embarque, a Flagg on Roxbury meeting House; If they Actually Land at Dorchester Two Flaggs, One, over the Other; In case...
[1 March 1776] . “As General Officer of the Day Yesterday, I Visited the Guards in all Advanced Posts Between Cambridge and Mystick Rivers, and the Main Guards at Cambridge, Prospect & Winter Hill. I found the Guards Vigilant & the Sentries Alert.” ADS , DNA : RG 93, Revolutionary War Rolls. Sullivan, who was brigadier of the day for 29 Feb., apparently wrote this undated report on 1 March....
4 March 1776 . “As General officer of the Day Yesterday I visited all The Guards herein after mentioned. . . . I also ordered the field officers of the Day to go the Rounds by Night which they Did & found the Guards vigilent & Sentries alert.” ADS , DNA : RG 93, Revolutionary War Rolls. Sullivan included in his report a return of the guards at Winter Hill, Plowed Hill, the White House,...
7 March 1776. “As Brigadier General of the Day yesterday I visited The Several Guards hereafter mentioned & found the Guards vigilent & Sentrys Alert Except at the South & north Redoubt in both of which I found all the Guards within the Guard Houses and the Sentrys Taking no Notice of my Coming or Even of any thing Else[.] The South Redoubt was Commanded by Ensign Brown & the North by Lieut....
Winter Hill, 10 March 1776 . “As Brigadier Genl of the Day Yesterday Orderd the Guards to be visited; found them alert as usual. ADS , DNA : RG 93, Revolutionary War Rolls. Sullivan included in his report a return of the guards with “Occurrences” at several of the posts. At 10:00 a.m. on 9 Mar., he reported that he “went Down the River in a Boat by Bunkers Hill[.] no Large cannon there & but...
being Desired by Capt. Miller Late of Colo. Doolittles Regt to Certify in his favour to Your Excellency I can only Say that he Acted as Capt. in That Regiment till the 26 of Novr then by vote of the Regt (as I was Informed) he Acted as major—I Never knew or heard he had a Commission for that purpose till he Informed me of it yesterday I well remember he gave in his name among the Captains To...
In obedience to the orders given us we have met & deliberated upon the several matters referred to us by your Excellency & beg leave to report, That the following signals be given upon the approach of any number of Ships toward this Port Viz. Upon the appearance of any number of Ships by day from one to six a large flag is to be hoisted on the Highlands of Never sink, upon the appearance of...
after a Voyage of four Days I arrived at this place where I found Stark & Reeds Regiments who had by order of General Schuyler been Detained here for Boats none of which were then in Readiness for the Troops—General Schuyler arrived here on the Evening of the Eighth Instant I waited on him Immediately he Informed that the Coming of So many Troops was So unexpected that he had not Batteaus to...
I This moment received from Genl Schuyler the Inclosed malencholy Account from Canada in Consequence of which I am ordered to tarry with my Brigade till the provisions are Sent over—So that my Departure from this place which was to take place tomorrow will not happen all the Brigade except Daytons & Waines are gone on Dayton was to have marchd tomorrow morng & Waine with his part of a Regt on...
I this moment Returned from Still water where I have been To give Some Dire[c]tions about Conveying the provisions forward to our Troops in Canada immediately upon the Receipt of The Letters which I forwarded to your Excellencey I Draughted a number of men for the Batteaus from the Regiments here being well Convinced that the men appointed for that purpose would not in a year Carry forward...
I Cannot but Esteem it my Duty to Inform your Excellency of the Horrid abuse to the publick, by Keeping up the Two Regiments of Vanscoit & Winckoop. Those Regiments are said to be in this Quarter, but upon the strictest Enquiry, can be found no where. Colo. Vanscoit is here himself but has never furnished a man for guard or any Other Duty Since my Arrival. I have been applied to by Lt Colo....
I had wrote a Letter to Congress & Expected to have the honour of writing one to you befor the Commissioners Departed but as I found them going off before I could possibly finish one to you I Sealed that & begd Mr Chase to Desire yr Excellency to open & read it which Contained the purport of what I Intended to write yr Excellencey —I have Since that been to Montreal & find almost Every person...
I have the pleasure to Inform you that I Arriv’d here at a very Critical Moment with my Brigade. Genl Thompson was Left with but very few men to Defend this Important post. The Troops being Scatter’d about in a most Shocking manner. I had Issued Orders for all the well men to follow me as upon Departure of Genl Worster & the Death of General Thomas the Command Devolved on me: having given...
after having as I think given you a Just Representation of our affairs in Canada which I Dare Say Every person here will witness to I must beg you to Excuse my giving you the Trouble of one Petition which is That if it be possible for your Excellencey or General Lee to come here that it might be done. Though I Suppose General Lee cannot be Spared where he is I am well perswaded that Canada...
At three Quarters after 11 of Clock forenoon I received a Letter from Genl Thompson of Which the Inclosed is a Copy. I find that he has proceeded in the Manner proposed & made his Attack on the Troops at three Rivers at Day light for at that time a very heavy Cannonading began which lasted with Some Intervals to Twelve of Clock. it is now near one P.M. the firing has Ceased, Except Some...
It is with the greatest pain I inform you that after our retreat from Canada, to this place, of which I have given your Excellency, An Acct thro’ General Schuyler, & after I had Determin’d to make a Stand here, Till I receiv’d your Excellencys order, That I find myself under an Absolute Necessity of quiting this Island for a place more healthy. Otherwise the Army will never be able to return,...
This morning at Day break I rece’d your Excellencys favour of the 16 Instant—am Extremely mortified to find that Every thing here has Turned out Contrary to my Expectations & your Excellencys wishes This was not owing to my being Deceived with Respect to the Enemy on the ground at the time I wrote but to the Sudden arrival of Such a number under General Burgoyne the night before the battle of...
I have from time to time Endeavoured to give your Excellencey the Earliest Intelligence of our movements in this Quarter but the Distance is So great that we are under necessity of making many without having your Excellencys advice; in my Last I mentioned that I Should remain with the Army at Isle au Noix till your Excellen[c]ey’s pleasure Could be known. This I Supposed would Serve to Cover &...
This Afternoon the Enemy formed & attempted to pass the Road by Bedford a smart fire between them and the Rifle Men ensued, the Officer sent off for a Reinforcement which I ordered down Immediately, a number of Musketry came up to the Assistance of the Rifle Men whose fire with that of our field peices caused a Retreat of the Enemy our Men followed them to the House of Judge Lefferds, where a...
It gives me the most pungent pain to inform your Excellency of the sad Stroke America must feel in the loss of General Lee, who was this morning taken by the Enemy near Veal Town. He ordered me yesterday morning to march for this place early, which I did—and by some fatality he was induced to go to Barnell’s Town, nearer the Enemy by three Miles than we were. Some Tories doubtless gave...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 27 Jan. 1777. On 28 Jan. GW’s aide-de-camp John Fitzgerald wrote Sullivan: “Your favour of yesterday came to hand about 12 last night” ( DLC:GW ).
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 28 Jan. 1777. GW’s second letter to Sullivan of 28 Jan. says that “the Express delivered me Yr favr this Evening.”
My Disorder has not abated but has Really weakened me So much that I am totally unable to wait on yr Excy to Day—with Respect to the Small pox my opinion is that the only way to get Rid of it is Immediately to Send all Infected persons to Some Back Town where an hospital Should be Erected; to this place Should Every person be Sent if the Symptoms of the Disorder appears on him. at this place...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 11 Feb. 1777. On 12 Feb. GW sent Sullivan an “Answer to your favour of Yesterday.”
I Recollect once to have Read That on the Fatal Ides of March, when Cesar was going to the Capitol Artemidorus presented him with a paper Containing Those words “Cesar Beware of Brutus Take Heed of Cassius come not Near Casca have an Eye to Cinna; Trust not Trebonius; Brutus Loves thee not These men have all but one mind and That is bent agt Cesar if Thou art not Immortal Look about Thee:...
I am Informed by Letter from the president of the Councill of New Hampshire Informing That that State Sensible of Colo. Scammells merit appointed him Colo. of one of their Regiments though he was from another State —I conclude therefore that as This appointment was Accepted by him before yo⟨ur⟩ Excys orders could have Reached him & as the (Infamous New England) Bounty will be an Inducement to...
I have called on General McDougle & Informed him Confidentially of the State of Our Army he Says there is about 600 Continental Troops here with two Massa. Militia Regts he is of opinion that The Continental Troops here Should be Sent forward & that the State Should Garrison this post; for which purpose he will call on Mr Jay, and consult with him upon the most Effectual Measures to bring it...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 22 May 1777. GW wrote Sullivan on 23 May : “Your favour of Yesterday I have received this morning.”
There was one Richard Burrest Tryed by General Court Martial on the 22d Instant, & Convicted by his own Confession of Attempting to Desert to the Enemy. he was taken by one of our Scouting partys near the Enemies Lines & Sentenced by the Court to be Shot for Desertion. I Should have forwarded him with a Copy of his Sentence to Head Quarters but as Desertions are So frequent here I think an...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 4 June 1777. Alexander Hamilton wrote Sullivan on this date: “His Excellency [GW] has received your favour of this day.”
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 5 June 1777. GW wrote Sullivan on 7 June : “I have yours of the 5th.”