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Knowing the expectations of the Kings ministers that a full Indemnity shall be provided for the whole Body of Refugees, either by a restitution of their property, or by some stipulated compensation for their lossess, & being confident, as I have repeatedly assured you, that your refusal upon this point will be the great obstacle to a Conclusion and Ratification of that Peace which is meant as...
ALS (draft) and three copies: Public Record Office; copies: William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress (two), Massachusetts Historical Society (two) Knowing the Expectation of the King’s Ministers, that a full Indemnity shall be provided for the whole Body of Refugees, either by a Restitution of their Property, or by some stipulated Compensation for their Losses, and being confident, as...
Transcript: New York Public Library Strachey’s return to Paris opened a new round of intensive negotiations which culminated in the signing of a provisional peace treaty on November 30. The present document is Strachey’s recollection of what he said to the American peace commissioners when he presented them with the British counterproposal to their second draft treaty. This meeting was held at...
AD : New York Public Library The committee appointed by Congress left Philadelphia on September 9, Franklin and Rutledge in carriages and Adams on horseback. They spent the night of the 10th in New Brunswick, where the taverns were full. Adams and Franklin had to share a bed in a room with one small window, which the younger man wanted shut for fear of catching cold; Franklin, delighted at the...
D and copy: Massachusetts Historical Society; two D and copy: Public Record Office; transcript: National Archives As new American and British negotiators were converging on Paris, Franklin’s isolation in Passy posed certain inconveniences. John Adams arrived on October 26 but, as he initially refused to call on Franklin, the latter was evidently unaware of his arrival until Matthew Ridley...