You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Steuben, Friedrich Wilhelm …
  • Recipient

    • Jefferson, Thomas

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Steuben, Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin, Baron von" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 1-30 of 58 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
[ Without place or date ] In a long war the difficulty and expense of raising men increases, and “every possible means should be employed for the preservation of the Men after they are raised.” The incomplete state of the regiments obliges one regiment to be shifted into another, destroying the attachment between officers and men “which is necessary for their preservation.” The officers,...
I cannot help expressing to Your Excellency the anxiety I am under occasioned by the delay of Genls. Muhlenberg and Lawson, nor, when I consider the unhappy Consequences that this Delay may Occasion, can I avoid justifying myself from having any part in it. Instead of forwarding Genl. Green the reinforcements he Expected, we are Keeping a Number of Corps dispersed about the State, where no...
Your Excellency was acquainted with My Intention of sending on Genl. Lawson’s Corps, and I can now inform you that I expect they will march from hence to morrow, tho’ not in such Numbers as I Expected, only 340 Rank and file appearing under Arms at the review Yesterday, including Infantry and Cavalry. The next Object is sending on as speedily as possible 400 Continental Troops and as many...
I wrote Your Excellency the 30th ult. that Gen. Lawson’s Corps would march Yesterday. This would Certainly have been the Case had not a report arrived that the Legislature had determined on their being discharged immediately. I should not however have suspended the march from a mere report, but Genl. Lawson himself shewed me a Copy of the Resolution of the house of Delegates on the subject. I...
I am this moment favord with your Excellencys Letter of this morning inclosing a Copy of the requisition made by Lt. Colo. Lee for the Corps under his command. I am perfectly of Opinion with your Excellency that the call on this State for the several Articles he demands is improper on any other principle than that of the general good. In the new Establishment of the Army this Corps is...
The Frequent abuses that have happened in the Recruiting Service, and an absolute Necessity that those Men who are raised for the War in Future should be fit for the Service and the Continent and State no longer deceived, by having Old Men, Deserters, &c &c, Imposed upon them; I have made the Within Instructions and beg Your Excellency to lay them before the Legislature that when they Pass the...
I came here Yesterday in full Expectation of sending off Colo. Greens Detachment of 400 Men this Day and it is with great pain I have to inform Your Excellency that so far from being ready to March I am even fearfull they will not be able to March at all. Amongst the 400 Men selected for this Detachment about 60 only had Blankets. The Militia I discharged left about 20 and of 200 which I...
I had the honor to write some time ago to Your Excellency, enclosing a Memorial of Colo. Senf, relative to the necessary fortifications on York and James River. I have kept this Officer in this state for the sole purpose of surveying all the defensible places, and he has lately by my Order taken an Exact draught of the situation of Hood. I could wish the Assembly might come to some...
[ Richmond ] 15 Dec. [ 1780 ] . Col. Green’s detachment marched from Petersburg on the 13th. Steuben on his return from Petersburg reviewed the troops at Chesterfield Courthouse, where there were 316 rank and file present and fit for duty, and about 200 sick; 20 of those fit for duty have been ordered to supply the places of deserters from Green ’s detachment; and 25 others have been assigned...
General Green among other requisitions having mentioned the equipment of the Troops raised by the State, I have no doubt but the Legislature will be glad to know what is generally understood by the equipment of a soldier, and therefore take the Liberty of laying before your Excellency the inclosed Estimate with some remarks thereon. I need not mention to your Excellency the necessity of...
I take the Liberty of laying before your Excellency, a few thoughts on the subject of raising and equiping the Troops required of this State: I should have done this before, but have been detained at Petersburg much longer than I expected, by the many Difficulties I met with in sending off a Detachment of 400 Men to re-inforce General Greene. I was in hopes of receiving Returns from the...
Richmond, 16 Dec. 1780. Lt. Col. [Richard] Campbell of the 9th Va. regiment, which is now at Fort Pitt, has orders to join his regiment but is unable to do so for want of $4,000 to pay the expenses of the journey. Steuben requests that a warrant for that sum be granted to Campbell so that the public service will not suffer by his longer detention in Richmond. FC ( NHi ); 1 p.
Richmond, 18 Dec. 1780. Encloses “some hints toward a Law to prevent illegal discharges and desertions from the Army.” Has written on the same subject to Congress and the Commander in Chief. RC ( Vi ); 2 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by Steuben; addressed; endorsed, by TJ: “Baron Steuben illegal discharges.” Enclosure: Probably Steuben’s plan for preventing desertion, printed below at end of...
I am about writing to Majr. General Greene, and as it’s of the utmost importance, he should be as exactly, as possible acquainted on what supplies he may depend, I would be glad your Excellency would let me know in writing, how far the Legislature have complied, with the requisitions, made them by General Greene. Among the articles of that requisition, the arms are the most essential. I dont...
I am informed that the Bill which passed the House of Delegates for compleating their Regiments on the new Establishment has limitted the number to 3000—by far too small a number for the end proposed—but even supposing it sufficient to compleat their Regiments in the first instance, yet from the natural casualties attending every body of Men the numbers will be constantly diminishing from the...
Many of our Misfortunes, to the Southward, and elsewhere, have arrisen from the Bad Arrangements of the Q.M. Department, which I hope In future will be on a better footing. General Green has appointed Lieut. Colo. Carrington. Dy. Qr. [Deputy Quartermaster] for this Department, and directed him to make application to the Executive of this State for Money and other article[s] he may find...
Your Excellencys Observation with respect to the artificers is just. A proportion of the Regiment furnished by Pennsylvania should certainly be destined for the Southward. I shall write the Board of War immediately on the Subject and have no doubt they will be sent on. The situation of our affairs are such that Necessity obliged Gen. Greene to require many things from the southern States which...
In case of the calling out a Body of Militia it will be highly necessary to adopt some measures to prevent the numerous abuses and terrible distruction of the Country which generally prevails. For want of having the Quarter Masters and Commissary Generals Departments under the direction of persons of Credit and influence the Inhabitants are wantonly distressed and thrice the quantity of...
I have the pleasure to acquaint your Excellency that the Enemy left Richmond this Afternoon about one o’Clock and proceeded towards their Vessells in consequence of which I immediately ordered a Battalion of Continental Troops and a Battalion of Militia to March to this place, and came myself as well to oppose any attempts to Land here as to be so far on the way to Petersburg where it is...
I have this moment the honor of your Excellencys Letter of this day. The thousand Stand of Arms I desired Colo. Davis to send to Colo. Gibson at Petersburg on being advised there were then 400 Militia there unarmed and more arriving and I must again request that no time may be lost in Sending as many there as can be collected. The Continental Arms were in the hands of Capt. Irish. I am...
I would suggest to you the Defenceless condition of Hunter’s Works at Fredericksburg full as great or greater an object than any were at Richmond. The people in that part of the Country as destitute of arms, as they are in this. The Distance to the Works from Potomack River about half as far as from Westover to Richmond. I would recommend it to your Excellency to order some fortification...
I am favored with your Excellencys Letter of the 9th. Upon the principles of a united opposition against the invaders of the United States, it certainly must be agreed, that when one of those States are actually invaded by the Common Enemy, the expences incurred by such invasion, must be common also. This Naturally throws the provision for such Troops as shall be employed on such particular...
Towards forming a force for the defence of the Country upon the present invasion, I have made such dispositions for arranging the Militia as regularly throws them into actual service as they arrive within my power. As the Arms to be put into the hands of the Militia are the property of the State, and Subject to the direction of Officers not under my Command, I do not conceive those Troops...
I have just received the inclosed from Col. Parker, and am very unhappy that till this moment I did not know of there being any Public stores at South Quay. I am now informd there is not only a Quantity of Powder, but a Number of Cannon at that place. I have given Col. Parker the Command of the Troops, in the front, with orders, if possible to remove the Powder and Cannon out of the Enemy’s...
From every intelligence it appears evident that the Enemy mean to take post in the lower Counties. The last I heard of them was that they were marching their whole force towards smithfield. In consequence of this I have ordered Genls. Muhlenburg and Weedon to march with what Militia they may have together to Williamsburg from whence I shall be able to order them as circumstances may require....
This will be delivered your Excellency by an Officer of Colo. Armand ’s Corps who will also present a List of some few articles necessary to render that Corps fit for Service. The absolute necessity of employing this Corps induces me to request your Excellency’s assistance in procuring these Articles for the expence of which I will answer for the Continent. The advantages of a Superiority in...
I must request your Excellency to order 200,000 Dollars to be paid to Mr. Benj. Harrison Subject to my orders for which the United States is to be accountable. I am &c. FC ( NHi ). RC (not found) was enclosed in a letter from Steuben to Benjamin Harrison of the same date, FC of which is also in NHi .
The 19th. Inst. in the Afternoon the Enemy crossed Nansemond River at Sleepy hole ferry and Encamped on the opposite bank. Eight of their Vessels then lay at the mouth of the River and two of Goodrich’s Privateers near the ferry, the Boats had fell down to the Fleet. From all their movements it appears evident they mean to take post, at least for some time, in Portsmouth and its environs. The...
I enclose your excellency an abstract of the state of the forces of this State drawn from the Returns. By this you will observe that supposing no deficiency arises in the 3000 men voted and that the number now in the field does not diminish 1844 men will still be wanting of the Quota determined by Congress. With respect I am Your Excellency’s Most obed. Servt, MS not located. Text from A. H....
Immediately after my arrival in this State Colo. Senf represented to me the necessity of establishing a Battery at Hoods and some other trifling works in the vicinity of James River. His opinion appearing to me to be well grounded, I did not hesitate a moment to submit it to your Excellency. I am informed you laid it before the Assembly but that it was not taken into consideration. The last...