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Capt. Harding delivered me your letter. I fear I Can render him little service. The Inclosed letter was recd. by my house within those few days. The Writer has been some Years in Paris, is a Gentleman of Intelligence & respectability—he has dipped in Politicks. He doubts the treaty being Confirmed in any other Way than—in toto. The News this Day from Egypt gives Compleat Victory to the French....
Mr. John Dumeste, born in France was in this Country previous to the Revolution, married in this City, to a Native about the Year 1781 or 1782. He is about to go to the Isle of France & wishes a Passport for himself & family Consisting of—himself— Elizabeth Dumeste his Wife John-Paul Dumeste  "   son George Kaporte Dumeste  "   Do. Jacob Adrian Dumeste  "   Do. Ann Elizabeth      " Daughter...
9 July 1801, Baltimore. Warns that Habersham’s changes in the mail route from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh greatly alarm and distress citizens of Carlisle and Shippensburg and appear to be a plot to make Jefferson’s administration unpopular there. Conveys political intelligence: “Mr. Montgomery says he has now little Doubt but Harford County will give himself & another Republican Elector.” RC (...
Heretofore the Route for the Mail from Philadelphia to Pittsburg has been thro: Carlisle & Shippensburg to Chambersburg—but by a late Regulation of Mr Habersham , the Route is thro: York & Berlin to Chambersburg—This change has alarmed & greatly distressd the Citizens of Carlisle & Shippensburg, who are to Recieve their Letters from Philada. indirectly thro: Reading & Harrisburg—the Change has...
12 July 1801, Baltimore. Presents Mr. O’Mealy, whom Smith has mentioned as possible commercial agent at Le Havre and whom JM believed a likely appointment at Hamburg [see M. O’Mealy to JM, 29 May 1801 (DNA: RG 59, LAR, 1801–9)]. RC ( DLC ). 1 p.
Mr. Patterson, who applies for the Consulat⟨e⟩ at Nantz, is the son of the former Collector (under the King) of Philada. He Adhered to the Brittish. The son is much of an Englishman & Connected by Marriage & Commerce with the English House of Nicklin & Griffith of Philada. He is a Clever Young Man, but Certainly ought not to have an Appointment. He & all his Connexions are Anglo Federal . Mr....
I have been in such excessive Pain for a few Days from something like the Rheumatism in my Jaws, that I have not been able to attend to your Letter of 11 Inst. The Treaty with France was signed on the 4th. Octobr.; the Berceau was taken on the 12th. same Month, and arrived at Boston, in November, subsequent to well authenticated accounts being received that a Treaty was effected; but previous...
Mr. Pitcairn the Consul at Hamburg is a Merchant of Considerable Credit & well supported in New York. the Merchants who do Business with him from this City Speak highly of him, as a Man of Understanding & one who has their entire Confidence,—and in this point of View he is Considerd by those who do not know his Transactions at Paris & a part of his Commercial Conduct, known to few—I do not...
I had observed that Pichon meant to be a little troublesome, Genl. Dearborne tells me he has given you some Uneasiness about the French Vessells sent into Brittish Ports & there Condemned. I should be very glad that he would Agree to the principal he pretends to assume—for there Can be no doubt relative to Privateers—they might be Condemned anywhere—& very, very few of their Merchant Vessells...
The Inclosed letter from Mr. Iznardi is in Consequence of my letters recommending his resigning for his Son, to Avoid the necessity I Concieved you would be under from his late Conduct of removing him—The Old Gentleman will probably be here as Soon as he can—I should be glad to know what Can be done to Comfort him without agreeing to the Continuance of his Son—There is a young Gentleman here...