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the Enclosed letter our Dear Mamma has requested me to enclose to you and to write to you she brought it with her from Philadelphia and has intended to write to you herself but has not been able she has been very much indisposed ever since she has been at home with a Bilious dissorder and has been brought very low with it, but is now we hope better and upon the recovery I came on with our...
I received a few days since with much pleasure your letter jointly with my new Sisters for which be pleased to accept my thanks. the account of your Marriage reached me some time before your letter, and I should have written congratulating you upon an Event which a knowledge of the Ladys merits induces me to hope may be fraught with happiness had I not been a little piqued that you had never...
I received some time since your letter of the 21 st of Febuary—and am very happy to find that you suppose my apprehensions respecting any embarrassments which may be thrown in your way are premature— I have heard from all quarters that the Choice of President has been highly approved of and is perfectly Sattisfactory to all parties even the most violent Democrats in New York have expressed...
I had the pleasure a few days since to receive your favour of the 11th inst. and was happy to hear of your health: the season has with us, been extremely severe, and my faculties have been, I believe, congealed by the cold. I have scarcely had any intercourse with any of my friends; and this must be my apology, for having omitted to offer you my congratulations upon your election to the...
I had the pleasure yesterday to receive your kind letter of the 23 d of Febuary from London— we supposed that you had returnd to the Hague ere that period— the communication is so much more regular from England to this Country that we should hear more frequently from you from there than from Holland—which is a sufficient inducement to me to desire that you should remain there— you receive I...
I am informed of a Vessell to sail for England soon and I have been too remiss already not to embrace this opportunity of writing to you— I had the pleasure to hear from you soon after your arrival— but since that time I have been indebted to our Parrents and Charles for information respecting you— but I am so conscious of my own deficiencies that I cannot complain of yours— nevertheless I...
Your letter of the 21st of March, has lain by me some time.   *  *  *  *  The prospect of a war alarms me much; many persons express their apprehensions respecting the safety of this town in particular— supposing that in case of a war, it would be of great consequence for the British to have possession of it, and presuming they will attempt to invade it; but I hope they will find other objects...
I have executed your commission but not exactly conformable to your request— the muslin like the pattern was all gone there was a peice which I thought would do to match it very well which I purchased and have sent by M r Charles Storer I hope you will not disapprove of my taking it I thought you would not be likely to get any thing so near it in Boston & I wish it may meet your approbation...
It is with very great pleasure that I address you, my dear mamma, from this place again. You will be as agreeably surprised as our friends here were, the evening before the last, to see us, and find us safe at New-York; for our arrival was wholly unexpected to them. We avoided informing our friends of our intentions, knowing that their anxious solicitude for our safety would render them...
It has been a subject of no small disappointment to me, not having received but one letter from you since you have been at Braintree, and only two since I left America.   *   *   *   *   I have written you and my brother several times, and have forwarded the newspapers, by which you will see the distressing situations in which the French are at present. The accounts from Paris are shocking to...