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Mrs. Smith presents her Compliments to Mr. Jefferson and is very sorry to trouble him again upon the Subject of the Corsetts, but not having received them, She fears Mademoisell Sanson has not been so punctual as she promised. If Mr. Jefferson will permit Petit to inquire after, and forward them by an early opportunity, Mrs. S. will be much obliged. RC ( MHi ); endorsed. Enclosed in William...
my Conscience really reprimands me for having so long omitted writing my Dear Brother, for several months past I must plead in excuse the want of Health, in December last we made an excursion to Bath and by going to Balls or Concerts every night for One week I cought such a Cold—as Confined me for a long time, and indeed I did not wholy recover till April. Mamma has already informed you of the...
I received last week the enclosed Letter addressed to you under Cover to Mr. Smith, and from the Contents of Mr. Smiths Letter (of which I enclose you a Copy), I concluded to keep it till his return. But this Morning the Bill of which the enclosed is a Copy was presented by the House of Smith, Bright, and Gray, for acceptance, which induces me to forward your Excellencys Letter and Copies of...
most readily my Dear Lucy do I acknowledge the tittle of friend with which you address me—and am very happy to have preserved your esteem thus far in Life— I wish it had been my fate to have enjoyed the Society of my friends more than it has,— three years have now elapsed since I parted with every female friend that I had acquired from my earliest infancy to the age of Nineteen; and I have not...
to what Cause my Dear Eliza am I to attribute that Air of Mistery which reigns throughout your last Letter to me,— you ever Possessed my friendship Esteem and affection, nor do I know that you have ever intentionally forfeited either, why then my Dear Girl do you imagine them estranged from you,— there is one Epoch of our Lives which I Consider as the Ordeal of friendship, if we are so...
I have now before me your Letter of the 3 d of August —which I intend to answer fully—and then 2 d ly to proceed to some points of information—and 3 d ly to some observations and reflection of my own— in the 1 st place I must acknowledge that your complaints against me for not writing are justly founded— I must Confess myself in fault—& this you know is the surest and most effectual way to...
I rose this morning with a fair prospect of landing before night, but alas, we are immersed in fogs and darkness. We have been within a few hours sail of New-York, for several days; but fogs, calms, and contrary winds, have deprived us of the happiness of seeing our native land; it is a most mortifying situation. I hope you have not known from experience to what a degree it is teasing; but...
to your Candour my Dear Brother—I must appeal for Pardon that I have thus long delayed to inform you of our safe arrival in this City— I have presumed that we were People of such importance that the news of such an event must have reached you through the Chanell of the news Papers as soon as it would have done, had I have written you immediately upon Landing— and realy my time has been so...
We are anxiously expecting, by the arrival of every post, to hear of your safety and health. I begin to be very impatient to hear of an event in which I am so much interested. I fear that you have been detained in England longer than you expected, perhaps, by the receipt of the letters Col. Smith forwarded from Bath to my father. Mr. Jay was very much surprised that the gentlemen to whom he...
we were made very happy this morning by the receipt of your Letter, informing us of the arrival of my Parents— be pleased to accept our sincere thanks for this early Proof of your attention— I am anxious to hear particularly respecting their Healths— I hope the Lameness of my Mammas Hand which you mention, is not to be of long continueance— I hope you will excuse the Liberty I have taken of...
Last Thursday I had the pleasure of receiving my dear papa’s kind letter of July 16th. I was very impatient to hear of your welfare. My mamma’s letter, received a few days before, was the first particular account I had heard of the situation of the health of my dear parents since your arrival. My brothers have been very inattentive to me; I fear they have forgot the duties they owe to an elder...
We came to town last evening to dine (by invitation) this day, with the President of Congress, and this morning I had the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 6th. * * * * I am very sorry to hear that you have had so much sickness and so many other perplexities to encounter, since your return; it increases my desire to be with you, to assist you all in my power. I hope you will escape...
It was with real pleasure my Dear Brother that I received a few days since your letter of july 20 th — It was a scource of double Sattisfaction as it releived me from an anxieity I had felt least you were less disposed to be attentive to your Sister than formerly, and as it informd me of your wellfare, I had sometimes been grieved at others half offended at not hearing from you, but the date...
I received, on Wednesday last, from the hands of Mr. T——, your letter, No. 4, of August 25th. He was so obliging as to call with it himself, in company with Mr. King. * * * Mr. George Storer came out last evening to pass Sunday with us, and by him I propose to forward my letter. He is very civil in forwarding letters for me, and is disposed to be sociable; I am glad that he is pleased with his...
this morning my Dear Brother—M r Storer Came out from New York—to spend the day with us and was the Bearer from thence of your kind letter dated Sep tr 11 th from Braintree, I am very much surprized that you had not at that time received a letter from me, I wrote you in August and M r Dane took my letter to Frank—and I had expected that you had received it long ere this,— Several of my...
I wrote you a hasty letter from New-York, just to acknowledge the receipt of yours, No. 5, the week before last; since which I have not heard from you, nor have I had an opportunity to write. * * * * * * * Pennsylvania has already appointed her Senators, who are Mr. Morris and a Mr. McLain. Poor —— is, then, disappointed; for he went home to make interest for himself, as it was said. There are...
almost twelve months have elapsed since the date of your last letter, I am conscious that this chasm in our Correspondence my Dear Eliza has been my own fault and very often have I reprimanded myself for my inattention—in not having noticed your last kind Letter,—but many casualties have intervened to prevent me from writing, which I hope will gain me your favourable indulgence for past...
I have lived long in expectation of the pleasure of receiving a letter from my Dear Brother but at length I am reduced to despair; and am led to inquire what has prevented the fullfillment of a promise which you made at your departure upon my requesting you to write;— I hope you did not suppose that my absence during your visit arrose from any inattention towards yourself;— most certainly if I...
I cannot omit so good an opportunity as now Presents to acknowledge the receipt of your kind letter of Nov. my Dear Lucy—, my Brother has made us a very agreeable visit and I hope when he returns he will give a favourable account of his friends;—and of New York. he has been danceing amongst the Ladies and has been much approved. but what will you think of their ideas of Beauty, when I tell you...
your letter of December 14 th I had the pleasure to receive the last week. and by my Brother Thomas who leaves us tomorrow I have an opportunity to Convince you that I am determined to fullfill my late promises of future attention to my Cousin—, Thomas has made us a sociable visit, and we are very Sorry to part with him even now,— the necessity of his attending his Studies must reconcile us to...
I had the pleasure to receive a letter from my Dear Brother many weeks since, I must acknowledge that I have been very deficient in attention by thus long neglecting to acknowledge its receipt, and I cannot find any sufficient appology to you, except a certain Indolence which at times takes possession of me and unfits me for writing—and which I presume others are not more exempt from them my...
your letter my Dear Brother of May 1 st I received three or four weeks past —just at the moment when I was removeing, and Commenceing, again Housekeeping it takes three or four weeks to settle our minds to new Situations—and domestick Concerns employ a Considerable portion of the attention of good Housekeepers—even if they are favoured with good Servants— thease causes must Constitute my...
I have this moment received your Letter of the 26 th and having a Leasure moment I embrace it to reply to it— it seems to renew my spirits to get a Letter from you—and they very frequently require the aid of such incidents as arrise from Communicated friendship to keep them up—for I find it very solitary— I have no inclination to go out, and except to M rs King I have not made any visits out...
I have received your two Kind letters of Decr 8 th and 17 th and am much obliged for your good wishes, and advice I have no desire to mix with the World or associate with any but my friends during the absence of my Husband—retirement from the World and an intercourse with, and attention, to ones family and friends are I presume Compatiable— the former it is my wish to observe the latter...
I received your kind Letter of 16 th of January by M r Jackson and feel myself particularly obliged my Dear Cousin for your attention at this time the absence of my Husband—leaves a blank in my mind which may be alleviated in some degree by the Kind attentions of my friends; but which nothing can fill up— my Chrildren are yet so small as not to afford me much society;— in their smiles;—and...
your kind attention my Dear Aunt demands an early acknowledgement, you judge very right that it would contribute greatly to my happiness could I be indulged with the society of my friends in your part of the world— I often do most ardently wish for it—but fate has ordered it otherwise—[and] I must submit— the removeall of my Mamma and her family from this place has deprived me of a very great...
I received your Letter of March 7 th my Dear Mamma and was very happy to find you so far recovered as to be able to use again your Pen —altho I doubt not you find yourself very feeble and fear it may be long before you regain your strength; yet I hope by care and attention you will soon subdue this fever which afflicts you— I confess that I am but a novice in Phisick—yet I cannot reconcile it...
I received last Evening your Letter of the 3 d inst— I began to think you had almost forgotten me. now and then I hear from you by persons who have seen you— they tell me that you appear to enjoy your health the weather grows so severe that I am almost discourage from thinking of quiting my own fire side. M r Smith does not find it convenient at present to Leave his official and private...
it has been oweing to the multiplicity of business that I have had upon my hands for a forghtnight past that I have omitted giving my Brother earlier information of our intended departure for Europe— we expect to sail in the course of this month— at first we intended going in the March Packett—but found it impossible to get ready we have therefore postponed our departure a few days untill the...
I this day received your Letter of the 23 d inst and was rejoiced once more to see your own hand writing— I have for some time feared that you were more indisposed than you would permit me to be informed of, I have suffered much anxiety on your account— inded my hands head and heart have been fully employed since I left you the former in preparing for my voyage and the latter by the...
the Letter which I had the pleasure to receive from you before I left New York I had not time to answer, I have now the pleasure to inform you of our safety after a Short but boisterous passage of 29 days and only 12 days from the Banks of Newfoundland to soundings in the English Channell, we were all very sick during the voyage but are now pretty well recovered and I hope to be able to...
I had the pleasure to receive your kind Letter of the 18 th of May by Barnard and was much releived by being informed that our Mother was recovering her health as rapidly as could be expected— I feared from not having received a Single line from her; that she was not so well as my friends represented her to me we have had Letters from all my other friends except herself since our arrivall and...
It has been a subject of no small disappointment to me, not having received but one letter from you since you have been at Braintree, and only two since I left America.   *   *   *   *   I have written you and my brother several times, and have forwarded the newspapers, by which you will see the distressing situations in which the French are at present. The accounts from Paris are shocking to...
It is with very great pleasure that I address you, my dear mamma, from this place again. You will be as agreeably surprised as our friends here were, the evening before the last, to see us, and find us safe at New-York; for our arrival was wholly unexpected to them. We avoided informing our friends of our intentions, knowing that their anxious solicitude for our safety would render them...
I have executed your commission but not exactly conformable to your request— the muslin like the pattern was all gone there was a peice which I thought would do to match it very well which I purchased and have sent by M r Charles Storer I hope you will not disapprove of my taking it I thought you would not be likely to get any thing so near it in Boston & I wish it may meet your approbation...
Your letter of the 21st of March, has lain by me some time.   *  *  *  *  The prospect of a war alarms me much; many persons express their apprehensions respecting the safety of this town in particular— supposing that in case of a war, it would be of great consequence for the British to have possession of it, and presuming they will attempt to invade it; but I hope they will find other objects...
I am informed of a Vessell to sail for England soon and I have been too remiss already not to embrace this opportunity of writing to you— I had the pleasure to hear from you soon after your arrival— but since that time I have been indebted to our Parrents and Charles for information respecting you— but I am so conscious of my own deficiencies that I cannot complain of yours— nevertheless I...
I had the pleasure yesterday to receive your kind letter of the 23 d of Febuary from London— we supposed that you had returnd to the Hague ere that period— the communication is so much more regular from England to this Country that we should hear more frequently from you from there than from Holland—which is a sufficient inducement to me to desire that you should remain there— you receive I...
I had the pleasure a few days since to receive your favour of the 11th inst. and was happy to hear of your health: the season has with us, been extremely severe, and my faculties have been, I believe, congealed by the cold. I have scarcely had any intercourse with any of my friends; and this must be my apology, for having omitted to offer you my congratulations upon your election to the...
I received some time since your letter of the 21 st of Febuary—and am very happy to find that you suppose my apprehensions respecting any embarrassments which may be thrown in your way are premature— I have heard from all quarters that the Choice of President has been highly approved of and is perfectly Sattisfactory to all parties even the most violent Democrats in New York have expressed...
I received a few days since with much pleasure your letter jointly with my new Sisters for which be pleased to accept my thanks. the account of your Marriage reached me some time before your letter, and I should have written congratulating you upon an Event which a knowledge of the Ladys merits induces me to hope may be fraught with happiness had I not been a little piqued that you had never...
the Enclosed letter our Dear Mamma has requested me to enclose to you and to write to you she brought it with her from Philadelphia and has intended to write to you herself but has not been able she has been very much indisposed ever since she has been at home with a Bilious dissorder and has been brought very low with it, but is now we hope better and upon the recovery I came on with our...