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Documents filtered by: Author="Smith, Abigail Adams" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I wrote you a hasty letter from New-York, just to acknowledge the receipt of yours, No. 5, the week before last; since which I have not heard from you, nor have I had an opportunity to write. * * * * * * * Pennsylvania has already appointed her Senators, who are Mr. Morris and a Mr. McLain. Poor —— is, then, disappointed; for he went home to make interest for himself, as it was said. There are...
I rose this morning with a fair prospect of landing before night, but alas, we are immersed in fogs and darkness. We have been within a few hours sail of New-York, for several days; but fogs, calms, and contrary winds, have deprived us of the happiness of seeing our native land; it is a most mortifying situation. I hope you have not known from experience to what a degree it is teasing; but...
Mrs. Smith presents her Compliments to Mr. Jefferson and is very sorry to trouble him again upon the Subject of the Corsetts, but not having received them, She fears Mademoisell Sanson has not been so punctual as she promised. If Mr. Jefferson will permit Petit to inquire after, and forward them by an early opportunity, Mrs. S. will be much obliged. RC ( MHi ); endorsed. Enclosed in William...
I received, on Wednesday last, from the hands of Mr. T——, your letter, No. 4, of August 25th. He was so obliging as to call with it himself, in company with Mr. King. * * * Mr. George Storer came out last evening to pass Sunday with us, and by him I propose to forward my letter. He is very civil in forwarding letters for me, and is disposed to be sociable; I am glad that he is pleased with his...
We are anxiously expecting, by the arrival of every post, to hear of your safety and health. I begin to be very impatient to hear of an event in which I am so much interested. I fear that you have been detained in England longer than you expected, perhaps, by the receipt of the letters Col. Smith forwarded from Bath to my father. Mr. Jay was very much surprised that the gentlemen to whom he...
We came to town last evening to dine (by invitation) this day, with the President of Congress, and this morning I had the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 6th. * * * * I am very sorry to hear that you have had so much sickness and so many other perplexities to encounter, since your return; it increases my desire to be with you, to assist you all in my power. I hope you will escape...
this morning my Dear Brother—M r Storer Came out from New York—to spend the day with us and was the Bearer from thence of your kind letter dated Sep tr 11 th from Braintree, I am very much surprized that you had not at that time received a letter from me, I wrote you in August and M r Dane took my letter to Frank—and I had expected that you had received it long ere this,— Several of my...
to your Candour my Dear Brother—I must appeal for Pardon that I have thus long delayed to inform you of our safe arrival in this City— I have presumed that we were People of such importance that the news of such an event must have reached you through the Chanell of the news Papers as soon as it would have done, had I have written you immediately upon Landing— and realy my time has been so...
I have now before me your Letter of the 3 d of August —which I intend to answer fully—and then 2 d ly to proceed to some points of information—and 3 d ly to some observations and reflection of my own— in the 1 st place I must acknowledge that your complaints against me for not writing are justly founded— I must Confess myself in fault—& this you know is the surest and most effectual way to...
It was with real pleasure my Dear Brother that I received a few days since your letter of july 20 th — It was a scource of double Sattisfaction as it releived me from an anxieity I had felt least you were less disposed to be attentive to your Sister than formerly, and as it informd me of your wellfare, I had sometimes been grieved at others half offended at not hearing from you, but the date...
Last Thursday I had the pleasure of receiving my dear papa’s kind letter of July 16th. I was very impatient to hear of your welfare. My mamma’s letter, received a few days before, was the first particular account I had heard of the situation of the health of my dear parents since your arrival. My brothers have been very inattentive to me; I fear they have forgot the duties they owe to an elder...
I received last week the enclosed Letter addressed to you under Cover to Mr. Smith, and from the Contents of Mr. Smiths Letter (of which I enclose you a Copy), I concluded to keep it till his return. But this Morning the Bill of which the enclosed is a Copy was presented by the House of Smith, Bright, and Gray, for acceptance, which induces me to forward your Excellencys Letter and Copies of...
most readily my Dear Lucy do I acknowledge the tittle of friend with which you address me—and am very happy to have preserved your esteem thus far in Life— I wish it had been my fate to have enjoyed the Society of my friends more than it has,— three years have now elapsed since I parted with every female friend that I had acquired from my earliest infancy to the age of Nineteen; and I have not...
we were made very happy this morning by the receipt of your Letter, informing us of the arrival of my Parents— be pleased to accept our sincere thanks for this early Proof of your attention— I am anxious to hear particularly respecting their Healths— I hope the Lameness of my Mammas Hand which you mention, is not to be of long continueance— I hope you will excuse the Liberty I have taken of...
my Conscience really reprimands me for having so long omitted writing my Dear Brother, for several months past I must plead in excuse the want of Health, in December last we made an excursion to Bath and by going to Balls or Concerts every night for One week I cought such a Cold—as Confined me for a long time, and indeed I did not wholy recover till April. Mamma has already informed you of the...
to what Cause my Dear Eliza am I to attribute that Air of Mistery which reigns throughout your last Letter to me,— you ever Possessed my friendship Esteem and affection, nor do I know that you have ever intentionally forfeited either, why then my Dear Girl do you imagine them estranged from you,— there is one Epoch of our Lives which I Consider as the Ordeal of friendship, if we are so...