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I had proposed to come & see you on Saturday last but hearing of the dangerous sickness of my Aunt Adams I was induced to visit Quincy. She has been afflicted with a violent bilious fever, which has left her almost prostrate. I came to town last evening. This morning Dr Welsh who stayed there yesterday came to town & informed me that the symptoms were little more favorable but I fear the...
You will see by the papers the death of my Aunt Adams—The funeral to be on Saturday two Oclock—I wish by all means that both of you will be present—If you come to Boston, you can in company with Mr. & Mrs. Foster, come out to Quincy in one of the carriages which I have already engaged at the request of the P——t. & which would otherwise come out & return empty. In great haste your brother DLC :...
Your letter of the 7 April last, I never had the pleasure to receive untill the 30 June. At that time, I was most severely afflicted by a violent attack of the rheumatism which confined me for nearly three months afterwards and of which I have not even now perfectly recovered. Since my convalescence from the last attack of the session of the District Court for Sept term & that of the Circuit...
I have received your letter of the 3 Jan and should have written you an answer before but thinking that it would be more satisfactory to both of us to converse together respecting the important subject of the letter I have delayed writing, constantly flattering myself that it would be in my power to visit Atkinson but this has not been in my power. Indeed I had prepared myself to have gone on...
In consequence of a Letter from my Agent at L”pool I declined going to that place for a passage to South Carolina—I will Sail from the port of London, in the course of a few days, but will wait upon your Excellency personally to take leave, & to be the Carrier of any Dispatches your Excellency may confide to my care prior to my Sailing—Lord Viscount Lowther Arrived at his House 25 Pall Mall...
Actions of little import, can demonstrate the Man of Magnanimity. I exult Sir, as an American Citizen, and it is with Pride, pleasure, & honorable Ambition, that I announce, the fact to have been demonstrated, in your Excellencys deportment in a late Transaction. Permit me Sir to make my acknowledgments with Sentiments, and in a manner, far above ordinary respect, and to assure Your Excellency...
Received of Abigail Adams in trust for my sister Abbe A Shaw thirty four dollars, which with three dollars 50 cents, paid by mrs Adams to mrs Foster, is in full for a quarters Rent of the Medford Farm, due in April MHi : Adams Papers.
I had promised my friend George Ticknor Esqr who will hand this letter to you, that I would accompany him to Quincy and have the pleasure to introduce him to you but unhappily I am prevented in consequence of my official duties. He is the son of Deacon Ticknor of this town, whom you may probably know. He has been regularly educated and admitted at the bar. He is an uncommonly industrious and...
I do myself the honour to send you with this Parson Gardners sermon—also a few more copies of your letter—There have been five thousand of them published here for circulation and five thousand more ordered from Salem— Mr. Atherton formerly of the house Cram Poor Atherton has requested me to mention his name to you for a n commission in the army if the selection should be left to the Senate as...
I had the honour to receive your letter to Mr Otis on Thursday evening last, and have attended to its publication, with as much expedition as possible—The printers have published an edition of a thousand copies and the sale of them commenced this morning and the whole are now disposed of. Oliver & Munroe are now printing a second edition of a thousand more on their own account and have...
I hope before this reaches Washington you will have arrived there and found your friends well and happy. I have received of Delisle & Dexter the rents which were due amounting to three hundred and seventy dollars and have paid Mr. Thayer as you will see by the inclosed receipt three hundred & fifty adding to which twenty dollars received as the dividend leave in my possession forty dollars for...
I hope by this time, you have safely arrived at Washington and found Mrs. Adams family and friends in good health—I send by the same mail with this three of Parks of papers containing four numbers with the signature of Publius Valerius and will send the others as they appear. You will see in these papers that Dr Eustace’s brother has made an assault on Park for in consequence of a publication...
I have had the pleasure to receive several of your letters and have regularly delivered the inclosures as you requested. The bill which you inclosed I gave to Major Russel for publication his paper being first published after the receipt of your letter—The same bill had been published in the Palladium several days and however ruinous its provisions might be to the peace and commercial interest...
On my return last evening from Atkinson where I have passed the last eight days in company with your brother Thomas I had the pleasure to receive your letters of the 23 & 24 ult. with Mr. Tracy’s speech for which I am much obliged to you At present I have only time to say that Mr Stedman was the writer of the letter alluded to in mine of the 13th—Russel when he shew me the letter did not...
I have received under cover from you two letters for Mr Stokes, which I delivered as soon as received The inclosed letter Mrs. Whitcomb gave me yesterday—The letter from Russel & Cutler I transmit at this request Mr Russels request You will probably have seen Ben Russell’s paper of last Saturday, a scrap of which I now send you, containing an extract of a letter, pretending to be from...
Some time since Andrew Foster, a relation of Mrs. Otis, applied to Mr. Otis for admission as student of law in his office—Mr. O. told him, that he then had his full number, the bar having limited themselves to three students at one time—that he could not then admit him, but that probably on Mr. Adams return, I should prefer studying in his office, and if so, Foster then might fill my vacancy....
The roads have been so bad & the weather such that I had almost despaired of ever hearing again from Quincy—I am very happy to hear that you and the President are well again—I left last week a letter & a number of papers at Connors for Mrs Black to take to Quincy. I hope you have received them. I send by Richard to days & yesterdays papers, with a number of papers & a letter from Wheaton,...
I have received the things you sent me by Townsend and my Aunt Cranch with your letter of this morning and the shirts, for which please to receive my thanks. I find this town so very noisy and the present situation in which I am so very different, on many accounts from any in which I have ever before been, that it will take some time before I shall become naturalized. This circumstance and not...
After living uninteruptedly in your family, for almost three years, and uniformly receiving, both from you and my Aunt, all the affection and tenderness of the most indulgent parents, I should do injustice to all the honorable feelings of a gr ateful heart, were I to omit this opportunity and leave you, Sir, without expressing to you my warmest acknowledgments, for the innumerable favors I...
For a few days past, every moment of my time has been so compleatly occupied in official duties, that I have had hardly a moments time to write or even to think for myself—We have not heard from or , since your last letter to the President from Philadelphia. The President has nominated all the officers for this district Mr F. Johnson of Frederick—Mr Marshall of Alexandria, brother to ex Sec of...
I have had the pleasure to receive your very kind letter of the 14th of Feb. at Baltimore, for which I pray you to receive the grateful offerings of an honest heart. I should not have neglected answering it, till this late date, had I not been uncommonly occupied in business, and had nothing to tell you, but what I wrote to Mr. Adams, whose letters I presume you have seen. Soon after you left...
I gave you the earliest information of Mr. Jeffersons election. Last night a mob of about fifty collected about the houses near to the capitol and compelled the inhabitants to illuminate them in honor to Mr. J. This passive submission of the federalists to the will of a rascally mob is in my opinion degrading in the lowest degree. I never would have submitted I would have died first. No...
Agreeable to my promise in my last, I now inclose to you Mr Jeffersons letter, which I consider to be the counterpart of the letter to Mazzei and which, you must have more philosophy, than I think you possess, to read without bitter indignation—without execrating the author, in the most unqualified terms. The whole letter is in the canting style of the vilest demagogue of our...
Yourrs of the 20th and 21st are received. I also received this morning a compleat sett of the Portfolio without any letter or direction respecting them. Presuming they were sent to be at my disposal, I shall send them by tomorrows mail, to Anapolis where I expect to get many subscribers. I some time since sent a sett to Boston and another to young Chace at Baltimore and if I had a number more,...
Your several favors are before me. The letter for———I sent by the first mail, after receiving it. I delayed sending your brothers letter, expecting that you would comply with your promise, and send me the whole series—then I should have returned them altogether. For the pamphlet of Gentz, please to receive my best thanks. I have been highly delighted and instructed by the perusal, and doubt...
The last letter I wrote you was from Frederick Town. I should have written to you more frequently, while on the road and sooner after our arrival in this city, had it not been for the concourse of people, from the time of his reaching entering, till he left a house, which has continually surrounded the; P. residen t, and which, in this warm weather, was infinitely more fatigiueing than his...
Before I left Philadelphia, I wrote you, expecting the letter would overtake you at Brookfield. The rain on monday prevented our leaving the city till Tuesday, as we had previously intended. The great rains, which they have had this way, have made the roads very bad—they are ploughed up, by the heavy loaded German waggons, exactly like the corn fields in New-England, and you might with equal...
By Major Toussard, we had the pleasure to hear of your being at Scotch plains in health, and of your being escorted a few miles from thence by some of the officers. By a letter from Malcom, I heard of your arrival at N York, and of your intention to leave that city on Saturday Morn. I presume by the time, this can reach Brookfield, you will be there—I shall direct it, under cover to Mr....
I am favored with your Lre & will reply thereto as fully as is in my power—the house I occupy—is built upon the side of an hill—the lower Story has two Cellars & a passage to the outhouses— The Kitchen Story has an excellent office, abt 21 by 20. which contains a folding bed 4 windows a Store room, a pantry, & the best Kitchen in America—in the Area is the Ice House fill’d—the Kitchen is in...
Your favors of the 19th & 22d I have recd. no Vessell at present is up for Phila.a. If any one offers, I will endeavour to procure the articles you wish to be sent. it is now so late in the season, that I do not expect I shall forward them— I am much oblig’d to you for the papers you inclos’d. such Mad Men, as Cooper can never do any injury to the Government. Their mad zeal, defeats their own...