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I wrote you from Worcester, which before this, I hope you have received. We lodged last night at Palmer, dined at Suffeild and arrived here this evening little after seven. We stopt a few moments at Windsor to see the Chief Justice—who says he enjoys better health at present, than he has for many years past. The Presidents old friend Mr. Trumbull was well enough to walk to the tavern and spend...
By Major Toussard, we had the pleasure to hear of your being at Scotch plains in health, and of your being escorted a few miles from thence by some of the officers. By a letter from Malcom, I heard of your arrival at N York, and of your intention to leave that city on Saturday Morn. I presume by the time, this can reach Brookfield, you will be there—I shall direct it, under cover to Mr....
We arrived at this place last evening about seven Oclock, where we have found most excellent accommodations. We have been highly favored with charming weather—excellent roads and good entertainment ever since we left you—find the chariot a much easier carriage than the coaches. The President thinks he never made so great a progress in his journey with so much ease to himself as the present. At...
After quite an agreeable journey we arrived at this place on the 10th inst. where we have found much better accommodations than we had any reason to expect. We are at present with two old maids Miss Barnes’s, who appear to be civil and obligeing—they have furnished the President with two rooms, a parlour handsomely furnished and a convenient bed chamber. The City is very much crouded at...
Your favor of the 28th inst I this morning had the pleasure to receive and for which my best thanks are due you. With this you will receive a letter from Mr T. Adams received last evening—I think the probability is that he will be with us this Afternoon. The Chief Justice and Govenor Davie have both left this place for New port where Captain Barrey is waiting to receive them and to carry them...
Your favors of the 19th & 22d I have recd. no Vessell at present is up for Phila.a. If any one offers, I will endeavour to procure the articles you wish to be sent. it is now so late in the season, that I do not expect I shall forward them— I am much oblig’d to you for the papers you inclos’d. such Mad Men, as Cooper can never do any injury to the Government. Their mad zeal, defeats their own...
Before I left Philadelphia, I wrote you, expecting the letter would overtake you at Brookfield. The rain on monday prevented our leaving the city till Tuesday, as we had previously intended. The great rains, which they have had this way, have made the roads very bad—they are ploughed up, by the heavy loaded German waggons, exactly like the corn fields in New-England, and you might with equal...
The last letter I wrote you was from Frederick Town. I should have written to you more frequently, while on the road and sooner after our arrival in this city, had it not been for the concourse of people, from the time of his reaching entering, till he left a house, which has continually surrounded the; P. residen t, and which, in this warm weather, was infinitely more fatigiueing than his...
For a few days past, every moment of my time has been so compleatly occupied in official duties, that I have had hardly a moments time to write or even to think for myself—We have not heard from or , since your last letter to the President from Philadelphia. The President has nominated all the officers for this district Mr F. Johnson of Frederick—Mr Marshall of Alexandria, brother to ex Sec of...
I have had the pleasure to receive your very kind letter of the 14th of Feb. at Baltimore, for which I pray you to receive the grateful offerings of an honest heart. I should not have neglected answering it, till this late date, had I not been uncommonly occupied in business, and had nothing to tell you, but what I wrote to Mr. Adams, whose letters I presume you have seen. Soon after you left...