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Your communication of Novr. 19th. ulto. came to hand a few days before my departure to attend the district Court at Portland, the duties of Which, & other engagements, has hitherto prevented paying that particular attention, which it always affords me pleasure to make on your Letters, which I have found the Copy formerly made from the Original of old Judge Samuel Sewall to his eldest son...
By the desire of the Grand Jury for the district Court of Main at this Term, of whom Mark Langdon Hill Esqr. of Bath was Foreman, the inclosed Address is respectfully forwarded / by Your Obedient / Humble Servant September 4th 1798 To John Adams, President of the United States. The Grand Jury at the District Court now holden at Pownalborough in the District of Maine, haveing with the Utmost...
I have been gratified with the perusal of Mr Williams’s Observations, on the temperature of Sea Water at differt depths. And the publication is the first of the kind I have seen, or heard of, and suppose the Thermr. may be very usefull to mariners, if properly attended unto. The Gulf Stream, I am of Opinion, Occasions the sudden transitions from Cold (very Cold) to temperate and Warm—in our...
your Letter of the 30th. Ulto. has been recieved, and once and again perused with pleasure and satisfaction; as is every of your Communications.—To humanize, or Civilize, I doubt not, is doing something essential to ameliorate the Condition of Mankind, as Well as, to Christanize, And attempts at the former ought to precede the latter—But the uncommon exertions of the latter; at the present Day...
Your favour of Decemr. 31st. ultimo I have once & again perused with pleasure.—I did not know, until your letter mentioned it that Joseph Adams, formerly the Minister of Newington, was your Uncle—I once heard him preach at York, at a Ministers meeting, from the Words “ How is the Gold become dim, and the most fine Gold changed ” I then thought He handled the Subject very well, but Whether...
It gives me real pleasure to see the tribute of esteem and respect, offered you from the convention of Massachusetts.—A collection of Persons, I really believe, as Wise learned and patriotick as ever convened in New England.—A tribute, as rare a Phenomenon in Politicks; as the Transit of ♀ over the ☉ in Astronomy. I sincerely congratulate you and Society at large, that your health permits you...
I have a desire of knowing, (in case it will not be too troublesome for you to make the Communication) the Occurrences that took place, in a Court of Admiralty, held at Boston, toward the latter part of Govr. Barnard’s Admina. for a supposed Murder on the high Seas.—It was I belive the last trial of the kind in Massa. prior to the american revolution.—Govr. Jno. Wentworth & some Gent of N....
it is some time since I Wrote you, since which you have you have been bereaved of the Lady of your early years. may you have divine consolations, under this and every other afflictive dispensation.—The political dissolution of Maine from Massachusetts seems to be rapidly approaching; And to which I have been uniformly Opposed, upon the principal that one large State, united would have more...
I have been much gratified by your Communication of Jany 29th. ult.— When I requested the Information, I did not, I think, mention the occurrence, which gave rise in my mind to the Application, I will therefore mention it.— Two person stand Indicted in the District Court of Maine, for piratically runing away with a Vessell & cargo— One (the Master) as Principal: the other (the Mate) as...
My life being yet continued, and my Scribling faculties stil remaining, I determined to address you a few lines once more to my Old Friend, I felt at a loss, for a Subject, to amuse, But upon the late Anniversary of Independence, I took up a Book which enumerated some of the causes which led to that important event—In which the Resolution of the American Lady, to proscribe the use of Tea ; so...