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It gave me the greatest pleasure to receive your favor of the 15th instant, as well from the assurance it affords of your being in good health, having lately heard that you were indisposed, as from the kind evidence it brings of your continued and ever valued regard. It was a disappointment to us that we cease not to regret, that we did not accomplish our long cherished purpose of visiting...
In a letter from one of our family in Philadelphia, I am given to understand, that Mr Dellaplaine has, as yet, made no request for the little manuscript character alluded to in a former letter which I had the pleasure to write you. But I have obtained a copy of it, which I beg leave herewith to enclose. It may be much too imperfect for the publick eye. I will say this of it however, that as...
It afforded me the greatest pleasure to receive your kind letter of the first instant. Encompassed at present by duties equally laborious and new to me, I am unable to say when I shall be able to break from them; but a visit to Montpelier is among the highest gratifications that I have ever promised myself on getting back to our happy country, and one that I shall be sure to realize when the...
The Edinburgh review reached me safely. I had read the article on the corn laws, but confess the explanation of the puzzle did not strike me. In the pencil marks it looks very simple. I suspect the reviewers took their theory from no less an authority than Smith; not that I have particularly searched this time to ascertain, but that I have observed in all their disquisitions which touch...
When it became my lot to superintend for a short time, the business of the department of state, I little imagined, that among the foreign ministers, the Abbe Correa was the one with whom my official relations were to be the least smooth. Having imbibed a veneration for his character and genius, struck with the engaging simplicity of his manners and liberality of his principles, I had, on the...
It is no interference with my publick employments to write to you. I can command some portion of almost every day, and the priviledge of using it in this way is most gratifying to me. Michiavel says war ought to be the only study of a prince. We shall indeed, Sir, be taught, by terrible experience, that it must henceforth be more the study of our republick. One of our Colonels told me not long...
Remarks upon Commodore Patterson’s letter to the secretary of the navy, dated New Orleans, August 15. 1816. There is no ground for considering the property taken possession of by the naval or military officers of the United States, after the destruction of the fort on the Apalachicola, on the 27th. of July 1816, as prize of war. Prize of war must be the result of some lawful belligerent act....
I was made happy by your last esteemed favor, from its assuring me that your health was restored to its usual tone. I lately spent an evening with young Mr Dallas, who came home in the John Adams. He is an intelligent young gentleman, and deals out a great deal of European anecdote, of Lords and Emperors, Kings and princes. He speaks with nothing but praise of Mr J. Q. Adams; who, he says, was...
I cannot longer abstain from expressing the deep interest with which I read your two letters on the power of Congress to lay duties on foreign manufactures, with a view to the encouragement of our own. To you, dear sir, I cannot say all that I think of them. They are like the voice of reason, suddenly interposed to still jarring elements. They have made a powerful impression upon the public....
In an accidental conversation I had with Mr Gallatin in the course of the last week upon the subject of men in Pennsylvania fitted for the higher posts of the army, the name of General Thomas Craig, of Northampton county, was mentioned. Without any personal acquaintance, I could only speak of him through his long reputation as a soldier and patriot. His advanced age was adverted to, as well as...
Your favor of the 20th of November got to hand in January. The letters which it enclosed for Mr Keilsall and Mr Joy, were both delivered, no difficulty having occurred this time in finding the former. I had equal pleasure in procuring his book, which was sent to Liverpool in January with directions to be forwarded in the regular packet from that port on the 1st of February. I hope it will have...
Your favor of the fourth of December came safely to hand, and with it the letter for Mr Joy, and one for Miss Wright, both of which have been delivered. Mr Smith into whose hands I put the latter, informs me that there was no difficulty in forwarding it to its destination. I have to beg, dear Sir, that you will without scruple commit to my care whatever letters you may have occasion to write...
Your acceptable favor of the 12th of August, reached me about a month ago. I fear that this government will continue deaf to every expostulation that can be addressed to it on the subject of the West India trade. In the negociation of 1818, when Mr Gallatin was here, we made the attempt with all earnestness to prevail upon them to give up their narrow doctrines, but to no effect; whilst...
Considering the struggle that is now going on in Pennsylvania, as not wholly local, I have been led to dip my pen in it. A month ago I threw together some remarks for one of the newspapers. They unexpectedly came back to me a few days since in the form of a two-penny pamphlet. I venture to enclose you one of them for the amusement of a leisure moment. Although no official promulgation has yet...
I had hoped that this letter would have shaped itself by some of the agreeable topicks touched in your two most agreeable favors of the 5th and 20th; the former of which my better half has put into one of her own drawers claiming it as her own property and desiring her most dutiful compliments and acknowledgements for the handsome things said of her; and the latter of which I received...
I have never seen Mr Madison so well fixed any where as on his estate in Virginia , not even before he was burnt out here. His house would be esteemed a good one for any of our country seats near Philadelphia , and is much larger than most of them. The situation is among mountains, and very beautiful. A fine estate surrounds him, at the head of which he appears to eminent advantage, as well in...
I have heretofore acknowledged, by a line, your much-esteemed favor of the 20 th of October, since which that of the 27 th of December has got to hand. The latter enclosed a letter for Mr Roscoe and one for M rs Cosway, both of which I was happy to be the means of forwarding. The residence of M rs Cosway was found out without difficulty. The list of books, I have had great pleasure in...
Your esteemed favor of the 24th of July came safely to hand, with the bill which it enclosed, the amount of which was obtained from the Mess: Barings. I send by this conveyance the anecdotes of the life of bishop Watson in two volumes, and a little posthumous work of Horace Walpoles, which has lately come out. These two books, coupled with Doddington’s diary, (to which I remember you first...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 28th of last month enclosing the one from Mr James Miller, at New Iberia, to the secretary of state. In reply to the several points embraced in the one which preceded it a few days, I now beg leave to state. First, as regards the letter from Commodore Patterson. I have furnished Mr Homans with some directions, which, in connexion with...
I have lately got through the extensive, and I believe I must add, very difficult, negociations, in which I have been engaged with this government, without concluding any treaty or other arrangement upon any one of the many subjects which they embraced. As regards the West India and commercial intercourse between the two countries in our hemisphere, Britain refuses to give us any other terms...
Immediately after the receipt of your favor of the 17th instant I wrote to Philadelphia , and have received from my mother an answer which I beg leave to lay before you, in her own words, as far as relates to the subject of our correspondence. “Both James and I have made search for the letters for Mr Jefferson ; the first he names (that of April 21. 1803 ) is not to be found; those I enclose...
I received through Mr Brent, in January, the favor of your few lines, accompanied by the letter for Mr Keilsall which was forwarded to my care. I am sorry to say that all my efforts to find him out, have, thus far, proved fruitless. I will not give them over, and hope that this instance of ill success in the beginning will not deter you from calling on me again whenever you have occasion. Your...
I beg to offer my best thanks for your acceptable favor of the tenth of May and the very interesting views which it held up of our home affairs. The enormous abuses of the banking system, seem at last to have roused our people to a just sense of the resulting dangers, and we shall henceforth, it is to be hoped, not witness so excessive a multiplication of these institutions, whilst those which...
At the very beginning of the last month my new appointment was bestowed upon me, and I was suddenly thrown into the midst of the supreme court the very day after, without the least previous acquaintance with any of its business. There I have been, day in and day out, ever since until last thursday blundering on in an agony of embarrassment and ignorance, doing the business of the court and not...
Since I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 11th of last month , the two written to my father , mentioned in your favor to me of the 31. of May , have come to light. As was thought possible, they had been put away even with more care than the rest, and on that account were not found as soon as the rest. I lose no time in enclosing them to you, happy in accompanying them with the...
Your acceptable favor of June last, reached me safely. The letter which it enclosed for Sir John Philippart, was immediately sent. I beg to say, that whenever you will use my instrumentality towards forwarding your correspondence either with this country or France, opportunities by the route of England being always most frequent, I shall feel honored and gratified. The just epitome of the...
I must be allowed to offer you my heartiest congratulations upon Commodore Perrys great victory on lake Erie. I know of nobody who will take as much pleasure in it as you. I know of nobody, sir, who has so just a title to rejoice at our splendid naval trophies as you. The Navy is yours. Hull must have been your officer. Decatur I know was. Bainbridge, Jones, Lawrence, Burrows, all of...
I enclose you a paper for your perusal and perhaps amusement. I mentioned to you lately that I had a great plan in my head.—a fortnight or three weeks ago it started to my reveries that Mr Jefferson ought to be called out, like an old pater patria , in a crisis like the present, and not suffered to repose upon his mountain. At length I determined he should be secretary of state again, which so...
You could have sent me no greater treat than the letter of Mr Adams which you were so kind as to enclose in your last favor. I had before now, and from the best sources, heard that his diplomatic correspondence on a file in the department of state exhibited when, taken from the beginning, a fulness, an elegance, an accuracy, an extent of observation, a sagacity, a profoundness of political...
Mr St George Tucker is, I believe, a native of one of the West India islands. He was brought to Virginia quite a boy before the revolution, fought with reputation at Camden as a militia major, was next a lawyer, and has held several civil stations in Virginia, where, as I understand, he has always been greatly esteemed for his virtues and learning. He is now, on the late appointment of...