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I think I must have been the debtor. But be that as it may, I seized, with equal avidity and delight the letter that had upon it the well-known and always welcome Quincy post mark and the commencement of which flattered me so much. Time and knowledge are powerful agents in working upon the judgment. I never knew Mr Dexter until the last supreme court. I had, indeed, seen him before, conversed...
Mr Hay is the son in law of Mr Munroe, and the day after I received your last favor I took the liberty to read a passage from it to the latter. This morning he requested of me an extract of it to send to Mr Hay, saying that he knew how highly it would gratify him. I ha ve cheerfully consented. Thus, Sir, while your kind correspondence is a source of pleasure and of pride to me, I make it also...
Your kind favor of the 14th of this month, was very gratifying to me. Nothing can be more interesting then the account which it gives of the Presidents visit to Boston and the vicinity. The letter from Mr Adams which you were so good as to enclose, I have to apologize for not returning sooner. I desire to thank you for the opportunity afforded me of perusing it. There is an impressive wisdom...
I am to thank you for the kind wishes contained in your favor of the 24. of last month. You have often, indeed, gratified and flattered me by similar ones, and I feel how much I owe to your over partiality. The appointment of Mr Adams gives, as far as I can ascertain, the highest satisfaction. If ever a citizen of our country owed his elevation to the solid merits of his own character, your...
Mr Owen, the eminent philanthropist of New Lanark, in Scotland, being about to visit the United States, I beg leave to put into his hands this letter to you. Without giving an opinion on the feasibility of all his plans for improving the condition of human society, I can only say that all agree that they are full of benevolence, and that good has already resulted from them in some places. By...
Grattan said of Burke lately, “that he had read more than all mankind, and that his command of history gave him the powers of prophecy.” I do not say it idly, sir,—I say it because I believe it,—the book of history lies more open to you than to any individual, at least, on this side of the water. Pray what is to be the end of the great scenes that are passing? What is to become of poor France?...
I cannot refrain from the expression of my most hearty congratulations to you on the auspicious news of peace. It comes, indeed, at a most happy point of time for our interests and our fame. I must be allowed to say, how largely I participate in the just and grateful joy it must bring to all your publick feelings. Your anxious moments, sir, will now be fewer; your labors abridged; your...
A day or two before I had the pleasure to receive your last valued favor of the 3rd of February, the governor of this state was pleased to honor me with the commission of Attorney general. It so happened that, at that moment our criminal courts here were upon the eve of sitting, which suddenly threw upon me a good deal of publick business. This is the chief cause to which I owe the loss, until...
I have complied with the requests contained in your letter of the 17th. instant. To Mr Dick I wrote yesterday. As regards the French letter from Rhode Island, the former one, to which it refers, does not appear to be in either of the departments mentioned. I have, however, enclosed the one you transmitted, to Mr Dallas, with some further though slight explanation of the transaction derived...
I am here on a visit of a few days to my remaining parent, enjoying as much happiness as a son can, under her kind roof. I am sure it will afford you pleasure, madam, to hear that her health is perfectly good, and her situation in all things comfortable and happy. Hearing me say I intended to write to you, she requested that I would present to you her affectionate and cordial remembrance....
I had before observed, in the newspapers, some account of the affair of which Judge Tucker’s letter speaks more particularly. I doubt, from the state of the facts which he exhibits, if the case can be reached with any effect unless under the act of June 5. 1794. There may be difficulties even under this act. The pamphlet which I beg leave to enclose, will serve to show the footing upon which...
17 July 1812. Requests that JM “accept a copy of the discourse the delivery of which, on the 4th of July, he was so obliging as to witness.” RC ( PHi ). 1 p. Enclosure not found, but see n. 1. On 8 July 1812 the National Intelligencer reported that JM, along with his family and the heads of departments, had been escorted to the Capitol on 4 July to hear Rush’s address. Afterward, JM’s party...
Respectfully enclosed for the eye of the President by R. Rush; who ventures to believe that, in times like these, the contributions of every patriotic and intelligent mind, will, when prudently obtained, be acceptable. RC and enclosure ( PHi : Richard Rush Papers). Docketed by JM . For enclosure, see n. 1. Rush enclosed an extract of a 3 July 1814 letter to him from Alexander J. Dallas (7...
Your opportunities of obtaining correct information from St Petersburgh, were long superior to those of any one else. In the loss of your accustomed fountain of supply, I send you a few extracts that I have copied from a couple of letters lately received from Mr Harris. I think they will afford you pleasure. Mr Russel writes from Stockholm under date of May 27th, that, the crown Prince was so...
Christmas Day I sit down to offer you the compliments of the season, in the most respectful, cordial, and friendly way in which they can be tendered. May you live to see many Christmases more, and may each find you in possession of health to enjoy the blessings and fame that surround you; of the faculties of a mind more full of wisdom as age continues to come over it; and of a heart still, as...
Since writing the enclosed, which I wrote at home, I have come to the Treasury building where mr Nourse has stepped into my office to ask if I have heard any thing of the report of the morning. It seems it is, that a flag of truce arrived at Annapolis yesterday after a short passage from England with dispatches from Lord Castlereagh to our government, which came on by express from Annapolis to...
Your favor of the 21st of April reached me a few days ago, and I have great pleasure in sending you herewith, a copy of Hones new testament, which I hope will be in time for the return of the packet. I have no account of the price, it having been just left at my house without a bill. It is but a trifle, and can be thought of at a future day. There is no other account between us. I have also to...
I was more gratified sir, than I can express at the letter which you did me the honor to write to me. The very evening before it came to hand I had finished reading, in course, the last of the lectures upon rhetoric and oratory, which for several weeks had occasionally yielded me great delight during the intervals of a busy profession. The just and often original reflections which they...
Your kind letter of the 13th has gratified me very much. When I spoke of New York having joined in with Pennsylvania and Virginia, I alluded to the issue of the late election for governor there. From a variety of local causes existing in that state, this last election seems to have been the only one they have had since the war began which fairly brought to a test the relative numbers of the...
Your favor of the 13 th of October got to hand yesterday. The letter which it enclosed for Mr Gilmer, I beg to return, Mr G. having left England early in October for the U. States. I did myself the pleasure to transmit to you, in October, a letter which he confided to my care, previously to his embarkation. The visit of La Fayette to our country, speaks too much in favor of his deserts and our...
Since my letter dated at 8. in the morning, it occurred to me that there might be an advantage in meeting the travellers at Baltimore if possible, in which Mr Graham and Mr Cutts both concurred. We therefore selected Mr Edward Duvall, of the navy office, who went off an hour ago in a hack with a letter from me to commodore Lewis of which the enclosed is a copy. We imagined that we might in all...
As soon as I received your acceptable and instructing letter of the 8th of this month, I wrote to a friend in Philadelphia, who is much in the literary and political way, to beg he would inform me, if he knew, who had been writing or preparing to write a commentary upon the “Defence of the American Constitutions,” for that I had understood there was such a work on hand, if not published. As to...
The winter is always the busy season here. With me, it is especially so from the fortnight that precedes the session of the supreme court, until its close. Therefore, before the arrival of that time, I must, while I can, have the pleasure of writing to you. It is chiefly that I may thank you for one or two of your late favors. That from “Montezillo”, written on Christmas day, I have...
Since writing to you this morning, I have determined upon doing a bold thing. I do not often write for the newspapers, as other duties and studies give me for the most part, as I would hope, better employment. But, a week or ten days ago, as the first small effort of industry after my recovery, I threw together some loose reflections upon our late war, which are here enclosed in three half...
Having been favoured with the perusal of a letter of this date, address’d to you by the Secretary of the Treasury, recommending James Martin Esqr as one of the commissioners for settling the Yazoo claims, should an act of Congress pass vesting such an appointment in the hands of the executive, I take the liberty most cordially to unite my voice to that of Mr Dallas, in favor of Mr Martins...
Daily and incessant engagements for the last five weeks at the supreme court of the United-states, the term not being yet ended; together with the necessity for some time before it came on of getting ready for the important business which it was to devolve upon me, have long cut me off from the gratification and advantage which I never fail to derive from the correspondence of your venerable...
You have seen so much, read so much, and thought so much, of publick affairs under all aspects; you know so well what is becoming in national dignity and spirit, and what is due also to policy and seemliness, that I declare, according as your ripe judgment may disapprove or sanction the enclosed paper, will I either put it by, or lay it before those who have the power, if they think fit, to...
The last number of the Edinburgh Review having just come out, I have great pleasure, whilst making up my despatches for the October packet, in sending it to you. It may probably be the means of putting you in possession of it rather sooner than you would otherwise see it, and I know the interest you will take in casting your eye over the article on Godwin’s work. These great northern criticks,...
According to the intimation contained in one of the letters I have had the pleasure to write to you, I took the liberty of enclosing to Mr St George Tucker, though entirely unknown to him; not the copy, but the original, of your favor to me of the 13th of August. It was the one in which you acknowledged the receipt of his beautiful little poem, and I was sure the original, in your own hand...
I do myself the pleasure to enclose you two letters from Mr Adams, which I venture to persuade myself you will look over with interest, as well from the writer as the subject. Having adopted the opinion that we had lost none of our former rights or liberties in the fisheries, I felt some desire to know his, and he has been kind enough to gratify me. The venerable patriot writes with an...
Some time in the early part of last month, I had the pleasure to write you a letter in answer to your favor of the 24th of March. The mail is so true that it never occurs to us to doubt the safe arrival of a letter when we know that it has been safely lodged in the post office; nor did that which I wrote leave any thing suspended leading me to look for an answer. My only reason for thus...
Since I read in the newspapers the address which you delivered in November to the convention of Massachusetts, as President of that body, the scene has been so often before my eyes, that I can no longer remain silent. As a political incident, its character is memorable. If I could forget the scene of general Washington surrendering up his sword at Annapolis, I should say that it was the finest...
Since you first allowed me the honor and gratification of corresponding with you, I have observed, that important events in the political world have trodden so closely upon each other that they interpose themselves between the successive favors I receive from you, and to such a degree as often to bear out of the view the subject of the last by drawing the eye towards some new occurrence, or...
Owing to the weather Mr Duvall did not reach Baltimore until a very late hour on wednesday night. He found that the party had all gone out in hacks to Ellicotts-mills early in the evening, with a view to join the stage yesterday morning and come on here. He followed and fell in with them there. He delivered my letter, no doubt, to Commodore Lewis, who perceiving that the ulterior purpose in...
R. Rush has the honor to enclose to the President, 1. A letter from the governor of Louisiana recommending, in relation to the pirates of Barataria, that a few of the more hardened offenders only should be prosecuted, and the conduct of the rest overlooked. 2. Another letter from the same, recommending Mr Duplessis as collector of New Orleans, in the room of Mr Dubourg, whose resignation is...
It was only the day before yesterday that Mr Andrew Eliot handed me your letter dated the 5th of May. Although you do not speak of him as being particularly known to you yet the mere circumstance of his bringing a letter to me from your hand was gratifying, and constitutes the highest claim to my attention to him. As yet I have seen him but once when he delivered it to me; but in whatever way...
I do not know that I have ever yet made my acknowledgments to you for the favor you were kind enough to do me in sending me a letter by the Revd. Mr Everett. That I was not fortunate enough to make his acquaintance I consider a real loss. I knew of his being here only the day before he went away, and was unlucky enough, (a thing that very rarely happens with me,) to have an engagement that...
By the mail of this day, I take the liberty to send you a small pamphlet , which I have to beg you will do me the honor to accept. That you may continue to be blessed with health in your retirement, and that your illustrious life may long be spared, is the wish of one who has the honor to subscribe himself, RC ( MHi ); at foot of text: “Ths: Jefferson, Esquire”; endorsed by TJ as received 23...
I well remember the law to which Mr Wirt alludes. Indeed, I drew it. It was deemed necessary from antecedent evils of a most embarrassing kind, which, I believe, it has, to a great degree, cured every where but in Virginia. I have thrown a few remarks upon the enclosed sheet, to be read as an addendum to Mr. Wirts letter, and designed to meet its main object. This I have done in compliance...
The enclosed letter came under cover to me by this day’s mail, with a request that I would deliver it into your hands. Having been informed of what it relates to, I feel very reluctant at being thus the instrument of obtruding upon your notice a subject of merely local concern at a time when I so well know that your mind is anxiously occupied upon matters of so much more deep and general...
I have been obliged within the last year or two to be very much of a law student. The solitude of Washington during the present and past season, has favored the habit; and for three or four months I have been reading and reading until I have found myself alternately a languid book-worm, and a heated enthusiast. The three last volumes of Robinson’s admiralty reports systematically; Pothier on...
Timeo Danaos, et dona ferentes. Nothing can be more applicable to our situation, and the late offer of Britain. I repeated it in conversation a few days ago in the hearing of Mr Ingersoll, of the house or representatives from Pennsylvania, and I have since heard with pleasure that he took occasion to thunder it out in his place at the capitol, and that it caught the ear of the house to a...
I cannot permit the letter which you did me the favor to write to me by Mr Ticknor, to remain unacknowledged, if it be only to express the gratification which I felt at receiving it, and the sincere pleasure I derived from the testimony it afforded of your recovery from the illness with which, shortly before its date, you had been afflicted. I have one other motive. The world knows, that...
Mr Dallas insists upon it that the emperor Alexander is a republican. As one proof of it he tells this anecdote. Conversing with Louis the 18th, he said “Sir, were I so happy as to reign over such a people as the French, it should be my study to make them perfectly free.” This is a noble sentiment even if it does not prove him a republican. Kings and Emperors, by the way, are very apt to be...
I trust this letter will find you not in a sick chamber where your kind favor of the 10th instant was written, but out again, restored to your usual health, witnessing the return of spring and awake to its enjoyments. The kind expressions of your letter are not more flattering than endearing. Those little children of whom you so kindly inquire, will, I doubt not, at one day look over it with...
The several measures indicated in your letter of the 5th of this month, have been carried into effect, or are in train to be so. I hesitated whether a certified copy of the proclamation should be transmitted from the department of state to Mr onis. Nothing had been said about it, and I know the peculiarity under which he exercises his functions. I should greatly have prefered an intimation of...
As the last Edinburgh review may not yet have fallen into your hands, I do myself the pleasure to send it to you. It belongs to Mr Serurier, who I am sure will be gratified when he hears the use I have put it to. There are some pieces in it which it may afford you a momentary relaxation to cast your eye over. The article upon France has not lost all its interest by the intervening events, and...
I have been honored with your favor of the 28th of last month, which got to hand this morning. The wishes of which it makes mention on behalf of Mr. Clarke, to be the bearer of the dispatches by the Chippewa to Spain, I will, with the greatest pleasure, lay before the secretary of state: the testimonials to his merit, and fitness for such a trust are so perfectly ample, that I flatter myself,...
Your life will never cease to be useful to your country. In spite of yourself, in spite of your years, you will always belong to it. The incident, from alluding to which I could not refrain in my letter of February, has been followed up by another scarcely of less interest, and which perhaps may one day produce effects still more worthy to be noted. I mean, Sir, the address to the cadets,...
Mr Duvall returned yesterday, but too late to drop a line by the mail. He brings however nothing material in addition to what my last letter stated. The party after returning to Baltimore, all went off by the way of York and Lancaster, and Commodore Lewis speaks of this as in part their first intention. The return from the mills he ascribed to having there first learned with certainty that not...