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I received, yesterday, your favor of the 31. of last month , and beg leave to return my warm thanks for your kind and obliging sympathy on the melancholy occasion of the death of my father . Few men, I believe, who have lived ever acted up more faithfully to what he took to be the line of rectitude and duty in all the actions of his laborious life; but in whatever lights he may have appeared...
I have taken the liberty to copy for your eye the enclosed lines, written by St George Tucker of Virginia, on being asked why he had ceased to court the inspirations of the muse. They struck me as very touching and beautiful both as to sentiment and manner. If you have not seen them before, perhaps they may afford you a few minutes pleasure; and the hope that they may do so has induced me to...
If I have detained the enclosed letter longer than was proper, I beg it may be ascribed, not to any insensibility to the favor done me in being allowed its perusal, but to a desire to turn it to the uses that it appeared to me to deserve. After showing it to the President, I took the liberty of reading parts of it to two of the members of his cabinet, that sentiments so important, coming from...
We have latterly had no papers from abroad. Mr Adams seems to have ceased sending them, probably from his preparations to come home. His last letter to the department stated his expectation to embark before the first of June. As to the French papers they come to us but seldom, and amount to but little when they do come. With Russia, France and Spain, our relations continue, I believe, just as...
Out of the circle of your own family, there are none who can feel more sorrow at the heavy affliction that has fallen upon you than we do here. We heard the melancholy news two days ago. “What exalted and long-tried excellence, exclaimed my wife, has gone to the tomb.” “As soon as my confinement was over,” she continued, “I had intended that my first letter, after one to my own mother, should...
I have heretofore acknowledged your favor of the 26 th of April, and a few days ago that of June the 5 th reached me. The enclosure which it contained for Mr Gilmer I immediately forwarded to him at Cambridge, where he now is prosecuting his objects, yours, those of Virginia, and I will add of our common country. This I know from himself, and I also heard of him accidentally a couple of days...
I beg leave to send you, enclosed, a few English newspapers. I have not been able to look over them myself, but perhaps you may be able to glean an hours amusement from them. They are the latest we have in the office. I shall have great pleasure in sending you others that arrive. Our last letters from Mr Adams are to the 29th of January. He takes no notice of the report of 19 ships of war...
The extraordinary juncture of publick affairs emboldens me to trouble you with this letter, and while I do so with great diffidence I must seek the apology in the motive and proceed to its immediate subject with no other claim to indulgence beyond that which the subject, coupled with the most ardent desires for our countrys welfare, can beget. The shock given to the publick hopes in the...
As a little exercise of the pen, I have just been throwing out a small pamphlet, of a copy of which I beg your acceptance. While at the bar, I had often occasion to perceive and lament the existence of a spirit too dependent and colonial. This little tract aims, as far as it goes, at showing that it is not justifiable. I was happy to hear from Mr Monroe a day or two age, that his health is...
While the military nominations are under consideration, I have ventured to think that it would not be unwelcome to the executive to receive, from every source, information in regard to characters in our country who may have pretensions in this line. Under this impression I took the liberty, a few days ago, to hand to the secretary of war a paper of which the enclosed is a copy. It is with his...
I lose no time in returning the enclosed letters, which came to hand to day, and for the perusal of which I beg leave to make my very sincere and cordial thanks. Such letters, from such a source, are a treat. It is the next thing to being in Europe, perhaps better in such times as these, and I am very thankful for the kind favor of being allowed to have them a little while in my possession. I...
There are so many motives for visiting Monticello , that it is no wonder all are ambitious to do so. M r Derby , a gentleman of Boston and greatly in esteem among those who have the pleasure of his acquaintance, desires to pay his respects to you, and I know how largely I shall promote his gratification in thus affording him an opportunity. Inducements more than common, operate with M r Derby...
I have great pleasure in sending you by a conveyance, which I hope will prove a safe one, Eustace’s tour and Malthus on population. In place of the most approved answer to the latter work, which, as yet, I have not been able to ascertain, I send the 34th number of the Quarterly review, which you will find to contain a more full notice of its doctrines than, I believe, has heretofore been taken...
Mr Ingersoll has sent me on the enclosed letter from Philadelphia, which, for the sake of the sentence it contains about impressment, I venture to enclose for your eye. Mr Ingersoll is not, as Mr King supposes, engaged in any publication upon this subject. He is investigating it, with others, preparatory to his congressional career, which I please myself with the hope will be prominent and...
Mr. Dallas, Mr. Crawford and myself met yesterday upon the business relative to the capitol. It struck us, that, under the act of congress of the 29th. of April last, the executive possesses authority to sanction the encroachment upon the centre building, to give room for the stair-way contemplated by Mr. Latrobe. Touching the expediency of such a measure, we found a resolution of the senate...
An old Scotch woman, in North-Shields, signing herself Ann Hewison, has sent me a manuscript Quarto of what she calls extracts from the diary of William Langborn, an American officer, kept during his travels through several parts of Europe. I copy, word for word, the following passages. London July 18. 1786. “Saturday—Did myself the pleasure, agreeably to yesterdays invitation, of dining with...
Your valued favors of the 5th and 10th, have gratified, instructed, and consoled me. As far as I stand informed, the administration have never dreamed that the war, or the treaty of Ghent, diminished the nicest hair of our rights to the fisheries, as we have ever before enjoyed them. On the 10th of November 1814, the joint mission wrote to the British commissioners exactly as follows—“In...
Mr Owen, of New Lanark, in Scotland, well known by the exertions which he has long been making to meliorate the condition of society in this country, being about to take a trip to ours, I presume to give him this line of introduction to you. I am not able to pronounce upon the feasibility of his plans in all respects; but that they are full of benevolence all admit, as well as that they have...
Not for the value of the article, but as a little token of remembrance, I beg you will allow me to ask your acceptance of, (sent by the vessel in which this letter goes,) an English cheese. Joining my wife in kind compliments to Mrs Madison, I remain, dear sir, with unalterable attachment and respect your devoted friend and servant RC ( PHi ). Enclosed in James Maury to JM , 3 July 1823 . Here...
It would have been a greatr gratification to me if I could have announced to you before this time the actual appointment of Mr John Adams Smith, as secretary to the Legation at London. I have, however, great pleasure in saying that I believe but one thing is wanting to it. Mr Monroe, who yesterday favored me with a conversation upon the subject, did not hesitate to say, that he feels “a...
I find, from a conversation with Mr Monroe, that it is not the intention of government to send dispatches to Spain by the Chippewa, or to employ her, in any other way, as a dispatch vessel. Hence the rumour adverted to in your favor of the 28th ulto. must, it would seem, have originated in some mistake. I ought to have transmitted this information some days earlier, and beg leave to apologize...
After having read, for a fifth time, the elegant letter of Mr. J. Q. Adams, I return it with renewed thanks; and as in the postscript to your favor of the 6th instant I think I recognise the hand writing of Mrs Adams, I must beg my respectful compliments and thanks to her also, to whom I feel indebted in part for the pleasure and benefit of perusing the letter in question. And next, sir, for...
For the first time since I was a lad, I have been making an excursion this season. Health and recreation were the double motive, though I am glad to say the latter predominated. I set out on horseback for the mountains in Virginia. I had never been into the antient dominion before, except merely upon its edge. Although it is filled with “Blenheims,” and “Hagleys” and “Mount Airys.” I was still...
My last to you was on the 9 th of this month in reply to your favor of the 14 th of August, and enclosed copies of two notes from Mr Blatterman. I have now the pleasure to mention, that the books, as by the enclosed bill and receipt from Mess. Lackingtons, have been forwarded from this port to Baltimore, in the Mandarin, (there being no ship for Norfolk or Richmond) in a box to your address,...
As the latest Edinburgh review may not yet have fallen into your hands, I do myself the pleasure to send it to you. It belongs to Mr Serurier, who I am sure will be gratified when he hears the use I have put it to. There are some pieces in it which it may afford you a momentary relaxation to cast your eye over. The article upon France has not lost all its interest by the intervening events,...
I have to offer many apologies for detaining so long the letters you were kind enough to put into my hands , and which I now return. When I got back from my short, though most pleasant and gratifying excursion as far as Monticello , I sent them on to Philadelphia . Intending to go there in the course of the autumn, I did not ask that they should be transmitted back to me, preferring to bring...
Encouraged by the very flattering permission you have given me, I am venturing to say to you in the form of a letter, (a liberty which I hope you will pardon,) that I have read the “review of the works of Fisher Ames.” And I must be allowed to say, that I have read it with the pleasure naturally belonging to the perusal of so able a performance. Although I carefully treasure up every thing...
After thanking you, most cordially, for the affectionate interest you have taken in my late indisposition, I must now say that I have happily gotten rid of all my complaints. Daily rides and walks this fine weather, with fish, oysters, and other good things in moderation, are fast giving me my usual strength. I hope soon to be better than ever. The Jesuits bark I hope I shall be able to do...
I think I must have been the debtor. But be that as it may, I seized, with equal avidity and delight the letter that had upon it the well-known and always welcome Quincy post mark and the commencement of which flattered me so much. Time and knowledge are powerful agents in working upon the judgment. I never knew Mr Dexter until the last supreme court. I had, indeed, seen him before, conversed...
Mr Hay is the son in law of Mr Munroe, and the day after I received your last favor I took the liberty to read a passage from it to the latter. This morning he requested of me an extract of it to send to Mr Hay, saying that he knew how highly it would gratify him. I ha ve cheerfully consented. Thus, Sir, while your kind correspondence is a source of pleasure and of pride to me, I make it also...