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After thanking you, most cordially, for the affectionate interest you have taken in my late indisposition, I must now say that I have happily gotten rid of all my complaints. Daily rides and walks this fine weather, with fish, oysters, and other good things in moderation, are fast giving me my usual strength. I hope soon to be better than ever. The Jesuits bark I hope I shall be able to do...
Your very obliging and gratifying favor of the 17th of this month, with all its accompaniments, was safely received, and I have to return my particular acknowledgments for your goodness in sending them. The letter from Ghent was like all other letters from the same pen, and I have no higher commendation to bestow upon it. It would have increased, beyond measure, the value of your favor to me...
Since writing to you this morning, I have determined upon doing a bold thing. I do not often write for the newspapers, as other duties and studies give me for the most part, as I would hope, better employment. But, a week or ten days ago, as the first small effort of industry after my recovery, I threw together some loose reflections upon our late war, which are here enclosed in three half...
Your valued favors of the 5th and 10th, have gratified, instructed, and consoled me. As far as I stand informed, the administration have never dreamed that the war, or the treaty of Ghent, diminished the nicest hair of our rights to the fisheries, as we have ever before enjoyed them. On the 10th of November 1814, the joint mission wrote to the British commissioners exactly as follows—“In...
R. Rush presents his respectful compliments to Mr Adams, and begs leave to enclose him a note which he has just received from Mr Monroe. In consequence of it, R. R. has, in the face of all past trespasses, ventured to send the papers back again to Mr Monroe. This will add a few days more to delays hitherto incurred, but to such good purpose that R. R. flatters himself with the hope of...
The enclosed papers have just been sent on to R. Rush by this days southern mail, and he loses not a moment in forwarding them to Mr Adams, with renewed apologies, with renewed thanks, with cordial respects and compliments, with a hope that they will find him in his usual health. His mother also, under whose roof he now has the happiness to be a guest for a few days, desires that he will make...
R. Rush presents his affectionate respects to Mr Adams, with the hope that Mrs Adams and himself are both well. He begs the favor of Mr Adams to present to Mrs A. the enclosed letter. On his return to this shabby village the day before yesterday after a month’s absence on a visit to beautiful Philadelphia, R. R. had the pleasure to find Mr Adams’s favor of the 26th of April, sealed with a...
Grattan said of Burke lately, “that he had read more than all mankind, and that his command of history gave him the powers of prophecy.” I do not say it idly, sir,—I say it because I believe it,—the book of history lies more open to you than to any individual, at least, on this side of the water. Pray what is to be the end of the great scenes that are passing? What is to become of poor France?...
Your opportunities of obtaining correct information from St Petersburgh, were long superior to those of any one else. In the loss of your accustomed fountain of supply, I send you a few extracts that I have copied from a couple of letters lately received from Mr Harris. I think they will afford you pleasure. Mr Russel writes from Stockholm under date of May 27th, that, the crown Prince was so...
I have been obliged within the last year or two to be very much of a law student. The solitude of Washington during the present and past season, has favored the habit; and for three or four months I have been reading and reading until I have found myself alternately a languid book-worm, and a heated enthusiast. The three last volumes of Robinson’s admiralty reports systematically; Pothier on...
Professor Cooper of Carlisle in Pennsylvania, formerly Tom Cooper the friend of Dr Priestly, is, I imagine, one of the most learned men in this, or in any country. His genius is universal, and his attainments seem without limit. Abandoning politicks, he is more usefully engaged in scientifick and literary discussions. My father used to doubt whether he or Priestly had most knowledge. He now...
I think I must have been the debtor. But be that as it may, I seized, with equal avidity and delight the letter that had upon it the well-known and always welcome Quincy post mark and the commencement of which flattered me so much. Time and knowledge are powerful agents in working upon the judgment. I never knew Mr Dexter until the last supreme court. I had, indeed, seen him before, conversed...
In a letter from one of our family in Philadelphia, I am given to understand, that Mr Dellaplaine has, as yet, made no request for the little manuscript character alluded to in a former letter which I had the pleasure to write you. But I have obtained a copy of it, which I beg leave herewith to enclose. It may be much too imperfect for the publick eye. I will say this of it however, that as...
For the first time since I was a lad, I have been making an excursion this season. Health and recreation were the double motive, though I am glad to say the latter predominated. I set out on horseback for the mountains in Virginia. I had never been into the antient dominion before, except merely upon its edge. Although it is filled with “Blenheims,” and “Hagleys” and “Mount Airys.” I was still...
In further answer to your favor of the 20th of last month, I beg leave to say, that I have just returned from the visit I talked of making to Philadelphia. I find it to be as decidedly the opinion of my mother and brothers, as I confess it was my own, that my fathers letters should not be given up for the press. If, therefore, you should write to Doctor Mease, may we venture to ask it of your...
You have seen so much, read so much, and thought so much, of publick affairs under all aspects; you know so well what is becoming in national dignity and spirit, and what is due also to policy and seemliness, that I declare, according as your ripe judgment may disapprove or sanction the enclosed paper, will I either put it by, or lay it before those who have the power, if they think fit, to...
The winter is always the busy season here. With me, it is especially so from the fortnight that precedes the session of the supreme court, until its close. Therefore, before the arrival of that time, I must, while I can, have the pleasure of writing to you. It is chiefly that I may thank you for one or two of your late favors. That from “Montezillo”, written on Christmas day, I have...
An old Scotch woman, in North-Shields, signing herself Ann Hewison, has sent me a manuscript Quarto of what she calls extracts from the diary of William Langborn, an American officer, kept during his travels through several parts of Europe. I copy, word for word, the following passages. London July 18. 1786. “Saturday—Did myself the pleasure, agreeably to yesterdays invitation, of dining with...
Out of the circle of your own family, there are none who can feel more sorrow at the heavy affliction that has fallen upon you than we do here. We heard the melancholy news two days ago. “What exalted and long-tried excellence, exclaimed my wife, has gone to the tomb.” “As soon as my confinement was over,” she continued, “I had intended that my first letter, after one to my own mother, should...
Since I read in the newspapers the address which you delivered in November to the convention of Massachusetts, as President of that body, the scene has been so often before my eyes, that I can no longer remain silent. As a political incident, its character is memorable. If I could forget the scene of general Washington surrendering up his sword at Annapolis, I should say that it was the finest...
Your life will never cease to be useful to your country. In spite of yourself, in spite of your years, you will always belong to it. The incident, from alluding to which I could not refrain in my letter of February, has been followed up by another scarcely of less interest, and which perhaps may one day produce effects still more worthy to be noted. I mean, Sir, the address to the cadets,...
I must insist upon it, notwithstanding the authority of your veto, that the subject is truly a noble one for the painter. A great patriarch, one of the chief founders of his country’s liberties, the steady advocate of her rights at the courts of foreign potentates as well as in all departments at home, is permitted by a kind Providence to live as it were into posterity, beholding the vast...
R. Rush has the honor to present his most respectful compliments to Mrs Adams, and to thank her for the favor she was pleased to grant him of reading the enclosed letter from Mr J. Q. Adams, as well as for the kind postscript which conveyed the permission. To himself and Mrs Rush it has afforded equal pleasure, and such as the productions of Mr A’s pen, on whatever subjects, never fail to...
If I have detained the enclosed letter longer than was proper, I beg it may be ascribed, not to any insensibility to the favor done me in being allowed its perusal, but to a desire to turn it to the uses that it appeared to me to deserve. After showing it to the President, I took the liberty of reading parts of it to two of the members of his cabinet, that sentiments so important, coming from...
I had the honor of your favor of the 14th of last month enclosed to me by Mr Smith, and upon this, as on all other occasions, was gratified at the receipt of it. There was also one for Mrs Madison, which I will take great pleasure in presenting to her, as soon as she returns to Washington. She is now expected in the course of a few days. I most sincerely hope, that the wishes of Mr John Adams...
It would have been a greatr gratification to me if I could have announced to you before this time the actual appointment of Mr John Adams Smith, as secretary to the Legation at London. I have, however, great pleasure in saying that I believe but one thing is wanting to it. Mr Monroe, who yesterday favored me with a conversation upon the subject, did not hesitate to say, that he feels “a...
I lose no time in returning the enclosed letters, which came to hand to day, and for the perusal of which I beg leave to make my very sincere and cordial thanks. Such letters, from such a source, are a treat. It is the next thing to being in Europe, perhaps better in such times as these, and I am very thankful for the kind favor of being allowed to have them a little while in my possession. I...
Daily and incessant engagements for the last five weeks at the supreme court of the United-states, the term not being yet ended; together with the necessity for some time before it came on of getting ready for the important business which it was to devolve upon me, have long cut me off from the gratification and advantage which I never fail to derive from the correspondence of your venerable...
I trust this letter will find you not in a sick chamber where your kind favor of the 10th instant was written, but out again, restored to your usual health, witnessing the return of spring and awake to its enjoyments. The kind expressions of your letter are not more flattering than endearing. Those little children of whom you so kindly inquire, will, I doubt not, at one day look over it with...
I am here on a visit of a few days to my remaining parent, enjoying as much happiness as a son can, under her kind roof. I am sure it will afford you pleasure, madam, to hear that her health is perfectly good, and her situation in all things comfortable and happy. Hearing me say I intended to write to you, she requested that I would present to you her affectionate and cordial remembrance....