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Having received the commission of attorney general of the United states which you have been pleased to confer upon me, I have the honor to signify, respectfully, my acceptance of it. Amidst the sensibilities I feel at so signal a mark of confidence at your hands I can only say, that I am enabled to sustain the sense of responsibility it implies by nothing else than a consciousness of the good...
I have given the above extract exactly as I find it in a book of my venerated parent that I have just been reading, and which is full of interesting anecdote. I avow it in part as my motive, that I may ask you what toast you would give now if I had the happiness of being in your company at Quincy. That we shall have to fight longer is, as I intimated to you a few days ago, highly probable. The...
I had the honor of your favor of the 14th of last month enclosed to me by Mr Smith, and upon this, as on all other occasions, was gratified at the receipt of it. There was also one for Mrs Madison, which I will take great pleasure in presenting to her, as soon as she returns to Washington. She is now expected in the course of a few days. I most sincerely hope, that the wishes of Mr John Adams...
In further answer to your favor of the 20th of last month, I beg leave to say, that I have just returned from the visit I talked of making to Philadelphia. I find it to be as decidedly the opinion of my mother and brothers, as I confess it was my own, that my fathers letters should not be given up for the press. If, therefore, you should write to Doctor Mease, may we venture to ask it of your...
I received on the 26 th of last month your favor of the 14 th of August, and have had great pleasure in attending to the commissions which it entrusted to me. Law books being very costly, Thomas’s edition of Coke Littleton is set down at £4.. 4, though but three volumes. Rapins history, in fifteen, may be had for £2. 12. It is therefore my intention to send you for the present, only these two...
I wrote on the 14 th of March, mentioning the circumstances under which I had purchased the books, and now it gives me pleasure to say, that they have been shipped on board the ship Henry Clay, Thomas Potts master, which sailed from this port a few days ago, for Richmond. By the accidental ommission of our consul to inform me of the sailing of the ship, until after she had gone, this letter...
R. Rush presents his affectionate respects to Mr Adams, with the hope that Mrs Adams and himself are both well. He begs the favor of Mr Adams to present to Mrs A. the enclosed letter. On his return to this shabby village the day before yesterday after a month’s absence on a visit to beautiful Philadelphia, R. R. had the pleasure to find Mr Adams’s favor of the 26th of April, sealed with a...
On Sunday last I saw the President, and he mentioned to me that not a single line had been received from our commissioners in Russia since they left the U. States. He spoke of it with surprise, and seemed at a loss to account for it, unless some dispatches from them had miscarried, as it is near eight months since they went away. Yesterday he mentioned to me in conversation, that, by the late...
I received two days ago by Mr Gilmer your highly interesting favor of April the 26 th respecting the University of Virginia, and lose no time in saying how happy I shall be in paying every attention to it. It merits, indeed, under all views, my very best attention. The great publick results that hang upon the well-being of this University, bind me as a citizen of our country to look anxiously...
I have just been favored with your confidential letter of the 11th instant, and will lose not a moment in adopting every possible precaution calculated to give effect to its just wishes. I am astonished at the gross indiscretion that could have dictated or permitted the measure, and you may confidently trust to its being defeated. With very cordial respect &c PHi .
I must insist upon it, notwithstanding the authority of your veto, that the subject is truly a noble one for the painter. A great patriarch, one of the chief founders of his country’s liberties, the steady advocate of her rights at the courts of foreign potentates as well as in all departments at home, is permitted by a kind Providence to live as it were into posterity, beholding the vast...
I have sent on to Philadelphia the papers which accompanied your favor of the 20th instant. I had not been unmindful of the request intimated in your previous favor of the 12th, upon the same subject, and was upon the point of drawing up a few remarks in relation to it when that of the 20th arrived. In any other event I should have had great pleasure in rendering any little assistance in my...
Your very obliging and gratifying favor of the 17th of this month, with all its accompaniments, was safely received, and I have to return my particular acknowledgments for your goodness in sending them. The letter from Ghent was like all other letters from the same pen, and I have no higher commendation to bestow upon it. It would have increased, beyond measure, the value of your favor to me...
I yesterday received from Mr Bowring the enclosed letter and packet to your address, which I have great pleasure in forwarding. Mr Bowring, with whom I have had much intercourse in this country, is a man of talents and attainments, of liberal opinions in government, and of good feelings towards the United States. He has a connexion with the Westminster Review, a new periodical work established...
The last kind favor that I had from you, mentioned your indisposition, and as it is a great while since, I am not without my apprehensions that you may be still unwell. Out of your own immediate family there is no one, sir, in America, or the world, who feels a livelier interest in your health and happiness than I do. I know how old you are in service, in honors, and in years. But years of...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 28th of last month enclosing the one from Mr James Miller, at New Iberia, to the secretary of state. In reply to the several points embraced in the one which preceded it a few days, I now beg leave to state. First, as regards the letter from Commodore Patterson. I have furnished Mr Homans with some directions, which, in connexion with...
R. Rush presents his compliments to M r Jefferson , and begs he will do him the honor to accept the little pamphlet herewith sent. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “M r Jefferson”; endorsed by TJ as received 25 Oct. 1815 and so recorded in SJL . Enclosure: Rush, American Jurisprudence, written and published at Washington, being a few reflections suggested on reading “Wheaton on...
I received, yesterday, your favor of the 31. of last month , and beg leave to return my warm thanks for your kind and obliging sympathy on the melancholy occasion of the death of my father . Few men, I believe, who have lived ever acted up more faithfully to what he took to be the line of rectitude and duty in all the actions of his laborious life; but in whatever lights he may have appeared...
I have taken the liberty to copy for your eye the enclosed lines, written by St George Tucker of Virginia, on being asked why he had ceased to court the inspirations of the muse. They struck me as very touching and beautiful both as to sentiment and manner. If you have not seen them before, perhaps they may afford you a few minutes pleasure; and the hope that they may do so has induced me to...
If I have detained the enclosed letter longer than was proper, I beg it may be ascribed, not to any insensibility to the favor done me in being allowed its perusal, but to a desire to turn it to the uses that it appeared to me to deserve. After showing it to the President, I took the liberty of reading parts of it to two of the members of his cabinet, that sentiments so important, coming from...
When it became my lot to superintend for a short time, the business of the department of state, I little imagined, that among the foreign ministers, the Abbe Correa was the one with whom my official relations were to be the least smooth. Having imbibed a veneration for his character and genius, struck with the engaging simplicity of his manners and liberality of his principles, I had, on the...
It is no interference with my publick employments to write to you. I can command some portion of almost every day, and the priviledge of using it in this way is most gratifying to me. Michiavel says war ought to be the only study of a prince. We shall indeed, Sir, be taught, by terrible experience, that it must henceforth be more the study of our republick. One of our Colonels told me not long...
Remarks upon Commodore Patterson’s letter to the secretary of the navy, dated New Orleans, August 15. 1816. There is no ground for considering the property taken possession of by the naval or military officers of the United States, after the destruction of the fort on the Apalachicola, on the 27th. of July 1816, as prize of war. Prize of war must be the result of some lawful belligerent act....
Your very acceptable favor of the 13th of November reached me yesterday. I am not able at this time to do more than barely acknowledge its safe arrival, but this I do with my grateful thanks. It will be, under many views, extremely valuable to me. I remain dear sir with devoted attachment and respect Your obliged and affectionate friend P. S. Your kind acknowledgement of the cheese I also...
I was made happy by your last esteemed favor, from its assuring me that your health was restored to its usual tone. I lately spent an evening with young Mr Dallas, who came home in the John Adams. He is an intelligent young gentleman, and deals out a great deal of European anecdote, of Lords and Emperors, Kings and princes. He speaks with nothing but praise of Mr J. Q. Adams; who, he says, was...
I cannot longer abstain from expressing the deep interest with which I read your two letters on the power of Congress to lay duties on foreign manufactures, with a view to the encouragement of our own. To you, dear sir, I cannot say all that I think of them. They are like the voice of reason, suddenly interposed to still jarring elements. They have made a powerful impression upon the public....
We have latterly had no papers from abroad. Mr Adams seems to have ceased sending them, probably from his preparations to come home. His last letter to the department stated his expectation to embark before the first of June. As to the French papers they come to us but seldom, and amount to but little when they do come. With Russia, France and Spain, our relations continue, I believe, just as...
Out of the circle of your own family, there are none who can feel more sorrow at the heavy affliction that has fallen upon you than we do here. We heard the melancholy news two days ago. “What exalted and long-tried excellence, exclaimed my wife, has gone to the tomb.” “As soon as my confinement was over,” she continued, “I had intended that my first letter, after one to my own mother, should...
I have heretofore acknowledged your favor of the 26 th of April, and a few days ago that of June the 5 th reached me. The enclosure which it contained for Mr Gilmer I immediately forwarded to him at Cambridge, where he now is prosecuting his objects, yours, those of Virginia, and I will add of our common country. This I know from himself, and I also heard of him accidentally a couple of days...
In an accidental conversation I had with Mr Gallatin in the course of the last week upon the subject of men in Pennsylvania fitted for the higher posts of the army, the name of General Thomas Craig, of Northampton county, was mentioned. Without any personal acquaintance, I could only speak of him through his long reputation as a soldier and patriot. His advanced age was adverted to, as well as...