You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Rush, Richard

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 7

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Rush, Richard"
Results 61-90 of 152 sorted by date (ascending)
R. Rush presents his affectionate respects to Mr Adams, with the hope that Mrs Adams and himself are both well. He begs the favor of Mr Adams to present to Mrs A. the enclosed letter. On his return to this shabby village the day before yesterday after a month’s absence on a visit to beautiful Philadelphia, R. R. had the pleasure to find Mr Adams’s favor of the 26th of April, sealed with a...
I had the honor of your favor of the 14th of last month enclosed to me by Mr Smith, and upon this, as on all other occasions, was gratified at the receipt of it. There was also one for Mrs Madison, which I will take great pleasure in presenting to her, as soon as she returns to Washington. She is now expected in the course of a few days. I most sincerely hope, that the wishes of Mr John Adams...
It would have been a greatr gratification to me if I could have announced to you before this time the actual appointment of Mr John Adams Smith, as secretary to the Legation at London. I have, however, great pleasure in saying that I believe but one thing is wanting to it. Mr Monroe, who yesterday favored me with a conversation upon the subject, did not hesitate to say, that he feels “a...
As the latest Edinburgh review may not yet have fallen into your hands, I do myself the pleasure to send it to you. It belongs to Mr Serurier, who I am sure will be gratified when he hears the use I have put it to. There are some pieces in it which it may afford you a momentary relaxation to cast your eye over. The article upon France has not lost all its interest by the intervening events,...
Grattan said of Burke lately, “that he had read more than all mankind, and that his command of history gave him the powers of prophecy.” I do not say it idly, sir,—I say it because I believe it,—the book of history lies more open to you than to any individual, at least, on this side of the water. Pray what is to be the end of the great scenes that are passing? What is to become of poor France?...
Your opportunities of obtaining correct information from St Petersburgh, were long superior to those of any one else. In the loss of your accustomed fountain of supply, I send you a few extracts that I have copied from a couple of letters lately received from Mr Harris. I think they will afford you pleasure. Mr Russel writes from Stockholm under date of May 27th, that, the crown Prince was so...
September–December 1815 By the President of the United states of America. A Proclamation. Whereas, by an act of congress, passed on the third day of March in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, it was provided, that so much of the several acts imposing duties on the tonnage of ships and vessels, and on goods, wares, and merchandise, imported into the United states, as...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 28th of last month enclosing the one from Mr James Miller, at New Iberia, to the secretary of state. In reply to the several points embraced in the one which preceded it a few days, I now beg leave to state. First, as regards the letter from Commodore Patterson. I have furnished Mr Homans with some directions, which, in connexion with...
The Edinburgh review reached me safely. I had read the article on the corn laws, but confess the explanation of the puzzle did not strike me. In the pencil marks it looks very simple. I suspect the reviewers took their theory from no less an authority than Smith; not that I have particularly searched this time to ascertain, but that I have observed in all their disquisitions which touch...
I lose no time in returning the enclosed letters, which came to hand to day, and for the perusal of which I beg leave to make my very sincere and cordial thanks. Such letters, from such a source, are a treat. It is the next thing to being in Europe, perhaps better in such times as these, and I am very thankful for the kind favor of being allowed to have them a little while in my possession. I...
Employing myself during the past month in arranging papers, I laid my hands upon the enclosed, written at the time it bears date. I am induced to send it for the mere sake of what it contains about Bonaparte; not indeed, that we can subscribe to all it says, but that as his character seems to go on evolving new anomolies, its confident assertions about him as far back as the days of...
The several measures indicated in your letter of the 5th of this month, have been carried into effect, or are in train to be so. I hesitated whether a certified copy of the proclamation should be transmitted from the department of state to Mr. Onis. Nothing had been said about it, and I know the peculiarity under which he exercises his functions. I should greatly have prefered an intimation of...
I have just been favored with your confidential letter of the 11th instant, and will lose not a moment in adopting every possible precaution calculated to give effect to its just wishes. I am astonished at the gross indiscretion that could have dictated or permitted the measure, and you may confidently trust to its being defeated. With very cordial respect &c PHi .
Since my letter dated at 8. in the morning, it occurred to me that there might be an advantage in meeting the travellers at Baltimore if possible, in which Mr Graham and Mr Cutts both concurred. We therefore selected Mr Edward Duvall, of the navy office, who went off an hour ago in a hack with a letter from me to Commodore Lewis of which the enclosed is a copy. We imagined that we might in all...
Nothing has transpired since I last wrote, except the arrival of Commodore Rodgers from Baltimore yesterday afternoon. He mentions that the travelling party reached that city on tuesday evening, in the steam boat he believes. They took up their abode at Barneys. He adds, that Lucien Bonaparte is known to possess stock in some of the institutions of Baltimore, and that it was conjectured Joseph...
Owing to the weather Mr Duvall did not reach Baltimore until a very late hour on Wednesday night. He found that the party had all gone out in hacks to Ellicotts mills early in the evening, with a view to join the stage yesterday morning and come on here. He followed and fell in with them there. He delivered my letter, no doubt, to Commodore Lewis, who perceiving that the ulterior purpose in...
I have complied with the requests contained in your letter of the 17th. instant. To Mr Dick I wrote yesterday. As regards the French letter from Rhode Island, the former one, to which it refers, does not appear to be in either of the departments mentioned. I have, however, enclosed the one you transmitted, to Mr Dallas, with some further though slight explanation of the transaction derived...
Since the receipt of your letter of the 19th instant I have dropped a line to Mr Yates, and been with Mr Graham upon the subject of it. The case is, I hope, placed in a way to be satisfactorily adjusted. I enclose another letter from Mr Dick. The accompanying documents to which he alludes, I have not thought it necessary to trouble you with. It does appear to me, that his sensibility has been...
As a little exercise of the pen, I have just been throwing out a small pamphlet, of a copy of which I beg your acceptance. While at the bar, I had often occasion to perceive and lament the existence of a spirit too dependent and colonial. This little tract aims, as far as it goes, at showing that it is not justifiable. I was happy to hear from Mr Monroe a day or two age, that his health is...
I have been obliged within the last year or two to be very much of a law student. The solitude of Washington during the present and past season, has favored the habit; and for three or four months I have been reading and reading until I have found myself alternately a languid book-worm, and a heated enthusiast. The three last volumes of Robinson’s admiralty reports systematically; Pothier on...
R. Rush presents his compliments to M r Jefferson , and begs he will do him the honor to accept the little pamphlet herewith sent. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “M r Jefferson”; endorsed by TJ as received 25 Oct. 1815 and so recorded in SJL . Enclosure: Rush, American Jurisprudence, written and published at Washington, being a few reflections suggested on reading “Wheaton on...
Professor Cooper of Carlisle in Pennsylvania, formerly Tom Cooper the friend of Dr Priestly, is, I imagine, one of the most learned men in this, or in any country. His genius is universal, and his attainments seem without limit. Abandoning politicks, he is more usefully engaged in scientifick and literary discussions. My father used to doubt whether he or Priestly had most knowledge. He now...
Daily and incessant engagements for the last five weeks at the supreme court of the United-states, the term not being yet ended; together with the necessity for some time before it came on of getting ready for the important business which it was to devolve upon me, have long cut me off from the gratification and advantage which I never fail to derive from the correspondence of your venerable...
I trust this letter will find you not in a sick chamber where your kind favor of the 10th instant was written, but out again, restored to your usual health, witnessing the return of spring and awake to its enjoyments. The kind expressions of your letter are not more flattering than endearing. Those little children of whom you so kindly inquire, will, I doubt not, at one day look over it with...
I am here on a visit of a few days to my remaining parent, enjoying as much happiness as a son can, under her kind roof. I am sure it will afford you pleasure, madam, to hear that her health is perfectly good, and her situation in all things comfortable and happy. Hearing me say I intended to write to you, she requested that I would present to you her affectionate and cordial remembrance....
I am of opinion the seventh additional article of the constitution, which provides that "no person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual service in time of war or publick danger, ” does not exclude the jurisdiction of courts...
I think I must have been the debtor. But be that as it may, I seized, with equal avidity and delight the letter that had upon it the well-known and always welcome Quincy post mark and the commencement of which flattered me so much. Time and knowledge are powerful agents in working upon the judgment. I never knew Mr Dexter until the last supreme court. I had, indeed, seen him before, conversed...
I well remember the law to which Mr Wirt alludes. Indeed, I drew it. It was deemed necessary from antecedent evils of a most embarrassing kind, which, I believe, it has, to a great degree, cured every where but in Virginia. I have thrown a few remarks upon the enclosed sheet, to be read as an addendum to Mr. Wirts letter, and designed to meet its main object. This I have done in compliance...
In a letter from one of our family in Philadelphia, I am given to understand, that Mr Dellaplaine has, as yet, made no request for the little manuscript character alluded to in a former letter which I had the pleasure to write you. But I have obtained a copy of it, which I beg leave herewith to enclose. It may be much too imperfect for the publick eye. I will say this of it however, that as...
I had before observed, in the newspapers, some account of the affair of which Judge Tucker’s letter speaks more particularly. I doubt, from the state of the facts which he exhibits, if the case can be reached with any effect unless under the act of June 5. 1794. There may be difficulties even under this act. The pamphlet which I beg leave to enclose, will serve to show the footing upon which...