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The extraordinary juncture of publick affairs emboldens me to trouble you with this letter, and while I do so with great diffidence I must seek the apology in the motive and proceed to its immediate subject with no other claim to indulgence beyond that which the subject, coupled with the most ardent desires for our countrys welfare, can beget. The shock given to the publick hopes in the...
Mr Ingersoll has sent me on the enclosed letter from Philadelphia, which, for the sake of the sentence it contains about impressment, I venture to enclose for your eye. Mr Ingersoll is not, as Mr King supposes, engaged in any publication upon this subject. He is investigating it, with others, preparatory to his congressional career, which I please myself with the hope will be prominent and...
It was only the day before yesterday that Mr Andrew Eliot handed me your letter dated the 5th of May. Although you do not speak of him as being particularly known to you yet the mere circumstance of his bringing a letter to me from your hand was gratifying, and constitutes the highest claim to my attention to him. As yet I have seen him but once when he delivered it to me; but in whatever way...
I received, yesterday, your favor of the 31. of last month , and beg leave to return my warm thanks for your kind and obliging sympathy on the melancholy occasion of the death of my father . Few men, I believe, who have lived ever acted up more faithfully to what he took to be the line of rectitude and duty in all the actions of his laborious life; but in whatever lights he may have appeared...
Immediately after the receipt of your favor of the 17th instant I wrote to Philadelphia , and have received from my mother an answer which I beg leave to lay before you, in her own words, as far as relates to the subject of our correspondence. “Both James and I have made search for the letters for Mr Jefferson ; the first he names (that of April 21. 1803 ) is not to be found; those I enclose...
Your kind letter of the 13th has gratified me very much. When I spoke of New York having joined in with Pennsylvania and Virginia, I alluded to the issue of the late election for governor there. From a variety of local causes existing in that state, this last election seems to have been the only one they have had since the war began which fairly brought to a test the relative numbers of the...
It is no interference with my publick employments to write to you. I can command some portion of almost every day, and the priviledge of using it in this way is most gratifying to me. Michiavel says war ought to be the only study of a prince. We shall indeed, Sir, be taught, by terrible experience, that it must henceforth be more the study of our republick. One of our Colonels told me not long...
I have taken the liberty to copy for your eye the enclosed lines, written by St George Tucker of Virginia, on being asked why he had ceased to court the inspirations of the muse. They struck me as very touching and beautiful both as to sentiment and manner. If you have not seen them before, perhaps they may afford you a few minutes pleasure; and the hope that they may do so has induced me to...
Since I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 11th of last month , the two written to my father , mentioned in your favor to me of the 31. of May , have come to light. As was thought possible, they had been put away even with more care than the rest, and on that account were not found as soon as the rest. I lose no time in enclosing them to you, happy in accompanying them with the...
Mr St George Tucker is, I believe, a native of one of the West India islands. He was brought to Virginia quite a boy before the revolution, fought with reputation at Camden as a militia major, was next a lawyer, and has held several civil stations in Virginia, where, as I understand, he has always been greatly esteemed for his virtues and learning. He is now, on the late appointment of...