You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Rush, Richard
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James
  • Period

    • Madison Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Rush, Richard" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 36 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have just been favored with your confidential letter of the 11th instant, and will lose not a moment in adopting every possible precaution calculated to give effect to its just wishes. I am astonished at the gross indiscretion that could have dictated or permitted the measure, and you may confidently trust to its being defeated. With very cordial respect &c RC ( PHi : Richard Rush Papers).
I am of opinion the seventh additional article of the constitution, which provides that "no person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual service in time of war or publick danger, ” does not exclude the jurisdiction of courts...
¶ From Richard Rush. Letter not found. 5 February 1814. Described as an eight-page letter, enclosing extracts of a confidential letter from [Alexander James] Dallas suggesting war measures, in the lists probably made by Peter Force ( DLC , series 7, container 2).
In considering the case submitted to him yesterday by the President, the attorney general has the honor to report; that, in his opinion, the holding a commission and rank as captain in the navy would be incompatible under the laws with holding, at the same time, the office of secretary of the department of the navy. RC ( DLC ). See JM to John Rodgers, 4 Dec. 1814 .
Having received the commission of attorney general of the United states which you have been pleased to confer upon me, I have the honor to signify, respectfully, my acceptance of it. Amidst the sensibilities I feel at so signal a mark of confidence at your hands I can only say, that I am enabled to sustain the sense of responsibility it implies by nothing else than a consciousness of the good...
Since the receipt of your letter of the 19th instant I have dropped a line to Mr Yates, and been with Mr Graham upon the subject of it. The case is, I hope, placed in a way to be satisfactorily adjusted. I enclose another letter from Mr. Dick. The accompanying documents to which he alludes, I have not thought it necessary to trouble you with. It does appear to me, that his sensibility has been...
I have sent on to Philadelphia the papers which accompanied your favor of the 20th instant. I had not been unmindful of the request intimated in your previous favor of the 12th, upon the same subject, and was upon the point of drawing up a few remarks in relation to it when that of the 20th arrived. In any other event I should have had great pleasure in rendering any little assistance in my...
Nothing has transpired since I last wrote, except the arrival of Commodore Rodgers from Baltimore yesterday afternoon. He mentions that the travelling party reached that city on tuesday evening, in the steam boat he believes. They took up their abode at Barneys. He adds, that Lucien Bonaparte is known to possess stock in some of the institutions of Baltimore, and that it was conjectured Joseph...
Employing myself during the past month in arranging papers, I laid my hands upon the enclosed, written at the time it bears date. I am induced to send it for the mere sake of what it contains about Bonaparte; not, indeed, that we can subscribe to all it says, but that as his character seems to go on evolving new anomolies, its confident assertions about him as far back as the days of...
The extraordinary juncture of publick affairs emboldens me to trouble you with this letter, and while I do so with great diffidence I must seek the apology in the motive and proceed to its immediate subject with no other claim to indulgence beyond that which the subject, coupled with the most ardent desires for our countrys welfare, can beget. The shock given to the publick hopes in the...
While the military nominations are under consideration, I have ventured to think that it would not be unwelcome to the executive to receive, from every source, information in regard to characters in our country who may have pretensions in this line. Under this impression I took the liberty, a few days ago, to hand to the secretary of war a paper of which the enclosed is a copy. It is with his...
As a little exercise of the pen, I have just been throwing out a small pamphlet, of a copy of which I beg your acceptance. While at the bar, I had often occasion to perceive and lament the existence of a spirit too dependent and colonial. This little tract aims, as far as it goes, at showing that it is not justifiable. I was happy to hear from Mr Monroe a day or two ago, that his health is...
Mr Ingersoll has sent me on the enclosed letter from Philadelphia, which, for the sake of the sentence it contains about impressment, I venture to enclose for your eye. Mr Ingersoll is not, as Mr King supposes, engaged in any publication upon this subject. He is investigating it, with others, preparatory to his congressional career, which I please myself with the hope will be prominent and...
Mr. Dallas, Mr. Crawford and myself met yesterday upon the business relative to the capitol. It struck us, that, under the act of congress of the 29th. of April last, the executive possesses authority to sanction the encroachment upon the centre building, to give room for the stair-way contemplated by Mr. Latrobe. Touching the expediency of such a measure, we found a resolution of the senate...
I cannot refrain from the expression of my most hearty congratulations to you on the auspicious news of peace. It comes, indeed, at a most happy point of time for our interests and our fame. I must be allowed to say, how largely I participate in the just and grateful joy it must bring to all your publick feelings. Your anxious moments, sir, will now be fewer; your labors abridged; your...
I have complied with the requests contained in your letter of the 17th. instant. To Mr Dick I wrote yesterday. As regards the French letter from Rhode Island, the former one, to which it refers, does not appear to be in either of the departments mentioned. I have, however, enclosed the one you transmitted, to Mr Dallas, with some further though slight explanation of the transaction derived...
I had before observed, in the newspapers, some account of the affair of which Judge Tucker’s letter speaks more particularly. I doubt, from the state of the facts which he exhibits, if the case can be reached with any effect unless under the act of June 5. 1794. There may be difficulties even under this act. The pamphlet which I beg leave to enclose, will serve to show the footing upon which...
17 July 1812. Requests that JM “accept a copy of the discourse the delivery of which, on the 4th of July, he was so obliging as to witness.” RC ( PHi ). 1 p. Enclosure not found, but see n. 1. On 8 July 1812 the National Intelligencer reported that JM, along with his family and the heads of departments, had been escorted to the Capitol on 4 July to hear Rush’s address. Afterward, JM’s party...
Respectfully enclosed for the eye of the President by R. Rush; who ventures to believe that, in times like these, the contributions of every patriotic and intelligent mind, will, when prudently obtained, be acceptable. RC and enclosure ( PHi : Richard Rush Papers). Docketed by JM . For enclosure, see n. 1. Rush enclosed an extract of a 3 July 1814 letter to him from Alexander J. Dallas (7...
Since my letter dated at 8. in the morning, it occurred to me that there might be an advantage in meeting the travellers at Baltimore if possible, in which Mr Graham and Mr Cutts both concurred. We therefore selected Mr Edward Duvall, of the navy office, who went off an hour ago in a hack with a letter from me to commodore Lewis of which the enclosed is a copy. We imagined that we might in all...
Having been favoured with the perusal of a letter of this date, address’d to you by the Secretary of the Treasury, recommending James Martin Esqr as one of the commissioners for settling the Yazoo claims, should an act of Congress pass vesting such an appointment in the hands of the executive, I take the liberty most cordially to unite my voice to that of Mr Dallas, in favor of Mr Martins...
I do myself the pleasure to enclose you two letters from Mr Adams, which I venture to persuade myself you will look over with interest, as well from the writer as the subject. Having adopted the opinion that we had lost none of our former rights or liberties in the fisheries, I felt some desire to know his, and he has been kind enough to gratify me. The venerable patriot writes with an...
Owing to the weather Mr Duvall did not reach Baltimore until a very late hour on wednesday night. He found that the party had all gone out in hacks to Ellicotts-mills early in the evening, with a view to join the stage yesterday morning and come on here. He followed and fell in with them there. He delivered my letter, no doubt, to Commodore Lewis, who perceiving that the ulterior purpose in...
R. Rush has the honor to enclose to the President, 1. A letter from the governor of Louisiana recommending, in relation to the pirates of Barataria, that a few of the more hardened offenders only should be prosecuted, and the conduct of the rest overlooked. 2. Another letter from the same, recommending Mr Duplessis as collector of New Orleans, in the room of Mr Dubourg, whose resignation is...
I well remember the law to which Mr Wirt alludes. Indeed, I drew it. It was deemed necessary from antecedent evils of a most embarrassing kind, which, I believe, it has, to a great degree, cured every where but in Virginia. I have thrown a few remarks upon the enclosed sheet, to be read as an addendum to Mr. Wirts letter, and designed to meet its main object. This I have done in compliance...
The enclosed letter came under cover to me by this day’s mail, with a request that I would deliver it into your hands. Having been informed of what it relates to, I feel very reluctant at being thus the instrument of obtruding upon your notice a subject of merely local concern at a time when I so well know that your mind is anxiously occupied upon matters of so much more deep and general...
The several measures indicated in your letter of the 5th of this month, have been carried into effect, or are in train to be so. I hesitated whether a certified copy of the proclamation should be transmitted from the department of state to Mr onis. Nothing had been said about it, and I know the peculiarity under which he exercises his functions. I should greatly have prefered an intimation of...
As the last Edinburgh review may not yet have fallen into your hands, I do myself the pleasure to send it to you. It belongs to Mr Serurier, who I am sure will be gratified when he hears the use I have put it to. There are some pieces in it which it may afford you a momentary relaxation to cast your eye over. The article upon France has not lost all its interest by the intervening events, and...
Mr Duvall returned yesterday, but too late to drop a line by the mail. He brings however nothing material in addition to what my last letter stated. The party after returning to Baltimore, all went off by the way of York and Lancaster, and Commodore Lewis speaks of this as in part their first intention. The return from the mills he ascribed to having there first learned with certainty that not...
Understanding, yesterday, from the secretary of the treasury that many of the applications for office under the late tax laws have been transmitted to Orange for your consideration, an arrangement in regard to them of which I was not aware until Mr Jones was kind enough to inform me, I take the liberty to state that a few have been sent on, from Pennsylvania, to my care, and are still in my...