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Documents filtered by: Author="Rush, Richard" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I am very happy that you have favored me with a letter respecting Mr Smith. It increases the interest that I before took in his situation. I will not permit myself to believe that any recollections are cherished to his disadvantage, on account of that portion of his conduct as a youth to which you have alluded. It would not be simply unkind, but unjust. It would be cruel. I took great pleasure...
Mr. Blaetterman called upon me a few days ago, to make some inquiries relative to the University. I told him that I believed its operations had been suspended for a while, through some unfortunate causes, but that I was under a like belief that its prospects were again as good or better than ever. He asked me if I thought he might write to you on the subject, and if I would forward his letter,...
The Mr Keilsall to whom the enclosed letter is addressed, I have not, by all the inquiries which it has been in my power to make since I came to London, been able to find out. I therefore return it, not without regret at my disappointment, which however is lessened by the excuse which the act of returning it affords me of writing to you. The last time I had that pleasure, was, if I recollect...
I received from Mr Gilmer, on the eve of his embarhation from Cowes, the enclosed letter, with a request that I would forward it to you. I am detained here contrary to my expectation until the spring, having written for my recall last year. Permit me hence to say, that if when Mr Gilmer shall have got back to you, it should be found that any thing has escaped his activity and zeal regarding...
It gave me the greatest pleasure to receive your favor of the 15th instant, as well from the assurance it affords of your being in good health, having lately heard that you were indisposed, as from the kind evidence it brings of your continued and ever valued regard. It was a disappointment to us that we cease not to regret, that we did not accomplish our long cherished purpose of visiting...
It afforded me the greatest pleasure to receive your kind letter of the first instant. Encompassed at present by duties equally laborious and new to me, I am unable to say when I shall be able to break from them; but a visit to Montpelier is among the highest gratifications that I have ever promised myself on getting back to our happy country, and one that I shall be sure to realize when the...
When it became my lot to superintend for a short time, the business of the department of state, I little imagined, that among the foreign ministers, the Abbe Correa was the one with whom my official relations were to be the least smooth. Having imbibed a veneration for his character and genius, struck with the engaging simplicity of his manners and liberality of his principles, I had, on the...
I cannot longer abstain from expressing the deep interest with which I read your two letters on the power of Congress to lay duties on foreign manufactures, with a view to the encouragement of our own. To you, dear sir, I cannot say all that I think of them. They are like the voice of reason, suddenly interposed to still jarring elements. They have made a powerful impression upon the public....
Your favor of the 20th of November got to hand in January. The letters which it enclosed for Mr Keilsall and Mr Joy, were both delivered, no difficulty having occurred this time in finding the former. I had equal pleasure in procuring his book, which was sent to Liverpool in January with directions to be forwarded in the regular packet from that port on the 1st of February. I hope it will have...
Your favor of the fourth of December came safely to hand, and with it the letter for Mr Joy, and one for Miss Wright, both of which have been delivered. Mr Smith into whose hands I put the latter, informs me that there was no difficulty in forwarding it to its destination. I have to beg, dear Sir, that you will without scruple commit to my care whatever letters you may have occasion to write...
Your acceptable favor of the 12th of August, reached me about a month ago. I fear that this government will continue deaf to every expostulation that can be addressed to it on the subject of the West India trade. In the negociation of 1818, when Mr Gallatin was here, we made the attempt with all earnestness to prevail upon them to give up their narrow doctrines, but to no effect; whilst...
Considering the struggle that is now going on in Pennsylvania, as not wholly local, I have been led to dip my pen in it. A month ago I threw together some remarks for one of the newspapers. They unexpectedly came back to me a few days since in the form of a two-penny pamphlet. I venture to enclose you one of them for the amusement of a leisure moment. Although no official promulgation has yet...
I have heretofore acknowledged, by a line, your much-esteemed favor of the 20 th of October, since which that of the 27 th of December has got to hand. The latter enclosed a letter for Mr Roscoe and one for M rs Cosway, both of which I was happy to be the means of forwarding. The residence of M rs Cosway was found out without difficulty. The list of books, I have had great pleasure in...
Your esteemed favor of the 24th of July came safely to hand, with the bill which it enclosed, the amount of which was obtained from the Mess: Barings. I send by this conveyance the anecdotes of the life of bishop Watson in two volumes, and a little posthumous work of Horace Walpoles, which has lately come out. These two books, coupled with Doddington’s diary, (to which I remember you first...
I have lately got through the extensive, and I believe I must add, very difficult, negociations, in which I have been engaged with this government, without concluding any treaty or other arrangement upon any one of the many subjects which they embraced. As regards the West India and commercial intercourse between the two countries in our hemisphere, Britain refuses to give us any other terms...
I received through Mr Brent, in January, the favor of your few lines, accompanied by the letter for Mr Keilsall which was forwarded to my care. I am sorry to say that all my efforts to find him out, have, thus far, proved fruitless. I will not give them over, and hope that this instance of ill success in the beginning will not deter you from calling on me again whenever you have occasion. Your...
I beg to offer my best thanks for your acceptable favor of the tenth of May and the very interesting views which it held up of our home affairs. The enormous abuses of the banking system, seem at last to have roused our people to a just sense of the resulting dangers, and we shall henceforth, it is to be hoped, not witness so excessive a multiplication of these institutions, whilst those which...
Your acceptable favor of June last, reached me safely. The letter which it enclosed for Sir John Philippart, was immediately sent. I beg to say, that whenever you will use my instrumentality towards forwarding your correspondence either with this country or France, opportunities by the route of England being always most frequent, I shall feel honored and gratified. The just epitome of the...
particularly proposals for abolishing all private war upon the ocean. And 6th. the Russian ukase of September 1821, relative to the North West coast of America. It is not yet ascertained if this government will consent to embark in negociation on all these points; and still less dare I promise, that she is prepared to come into our liberal views respecting them. It is with much hesitation that...