You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Rush, Richard
  • Period

    • Madison Presidency

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 7

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Rush, Richard" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 103 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have just been favored with your confidential letter of the 11th instant, and will lose not a moment in adopting every possible precaution calculated to give effect to its just wishes. I am astonished at the gross indiscretion that could have dictated or permitted the measure, and you may confidently trust to its being defeated. With very cordial respect &c RC ( PHi : Richard Rush Papers).
I am of opinion the seventh additional article of the constitution, which provides that "no person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual service in time of war or publick danger, ” does not exclude the jurisdiction of courts...
I beg you will do me the honor to accept a Copy of a discourse I delivered on the 4th of July at this place. The present crisis of our country, sir, is most momentous; but it seems greatly to be feared that the powerful and intelligent state of Massachusetts will not yield her zealous cooperation to the nation in its present struggle. With constant wishes for your health and happiness allow...
The enclosed papers have just been sent on to R. Rush by this days southern mail, and he loses not a moment in forwarding them to Mr Adams, with renewed apologies, with renewed thanks, with cordial respects and compliments, with a hope that they will find him in his usual health. His mother also, under whose roof he now has the happiness to be a guest for a few days, desires that he will make...
R. Rush has the honor to present his most respectful compliments to Mrs Adams, and to thank her for the favor she was pleased to grant him of reading the enclosed letter from Mr J. Q. Adams, as well as for the kind postscript which conveyed the permission. To himself and Mrs Rush it has afforded equal pleasure, and such as the productions of Mr A’s pen, on whatever subjects, never fail to...
I beg you will do me the honor to accept a copy of a discourse I delivered on the 4th of July at this place. The present crisis of our country, Sir, is most momentous; but it seems greatly to be feared that the powerful and intelligent state of Massachusetts will not yield her zealous cooperation to the nation in its present struggle. With constant wishes for your health and happiness allow...
¶ From Richard Rush. Letter not found. 5 February 1814. Described as an eight-page letter, enclosing extracts of a confidential letter from [Alexander James] Dallas suggesting war measures, in the lists probably made by Peter Force ( DLC , series 7, container 2).
In considering the case submitted to him yesterday by the President, the attorney general has the honor to report; that, in his opinion, the holding a commission and rank as captain in the navy would be incompatible under the laws with holding, at the same time, the office of secretary of the department of the navy. RC ( DLC ). See JM to John Rodgers, 4 Dec. 1814 .
R. Rush presents his respectful compliments to Mr Adams, and begs leave to enclose him a note which he has just received from Mr Monroe. In consequence of it, R. R. has, in the face of all past trespasses, ventured to send the papers back again to Mr Monroe. This will add a few days more to delays hitherto incurred, but to such good purpose that R. R. flatters himself with the hope of...
Having received the commission of attorney general of the United states which you have been pleased to confer upon me, I have the honor to signify, respectfully, my acceptance of it. Amidst the sensibilities I feel at so signal a mark of confidence at your hands I can only say, that I am enabled to sustain the sense of responsibility it implies by nothing else than a consciousness of the good...
I have given the above extract exactly as I find it in a book of my venerated parent that I have just been reading, and which is full of interesting anecdote. I avow it in part as my motive, that I may ask you what toast you would give now if I had the happiness of being in your company at Quincy. That we shall have to fight longer is, as I intimated to you a few days ago, highly probable. The...
I had the honor of your favor of the 14th of last month enclosed to me by Mr Smith, and upon this, as on all other occasions, was gratified at the receipt of it. There was also one for Mrs Madison, which I will take great pleasure in presenting to her, as soon as she returns to Washington. She is now expected in the course of a few days. I most sincerely hope, that the wishes of Mr John Adams...
In further answer to your favor of the 20th of last month, I beg leave to say, that I have just returned from the visit I talked of making to Philadelphia. I find it to be as decidedly the opinion of my mother and brothers, as I confess it was my own, that my fathers letters should not be given up for the press. If, therefore, you should write to Doctor Mease, may we venture to ask it of your...
Since the receipt of your letter of the 19th instant I have dropped a line to Mr Yates, and been with Mr Graham upon the subject of it. The case is, I hope, placed in a way to be satisfactorily adjusted. I enclose another letter from Mr. Dick. The accompanying documents to which he alludes, I have not thought it necessary to trouble you with. It does appear to me, that his sensibility has been...
R. Rush presents his affectionate respects to Mr Adams, with the hope that Mrs Adams and himself are both well. He begs the favor of Mr Adams to present to Mrs A. the enclosed letter. On his return to this shabby village the day before yesterday after a month’s absence on a visit to beautiful Philadelphia, R. R. had the pleasure to find Mr Adams’s favor of the 26th of April, sealed with a...
On Sunday last I saw the President, and he mentioned to me that not a single line had been received from our commissioners in Russia since they left the U. States. He spoke of it with surprise, and seemed at a loss to account for it, unless some dispatches from them had miscarried, as it is near eight months since they went away. Yesterday he mentioned to me in conversation, that, by the late...
I have sent on to Philadelphia the papers which accompanied your favor of the 20th instant. I had not been unmindful of the request intimated in your previous favor of the 12th, upon the same subject, and was upon the point of drawing up a few remarks in relation to it when that of the 20th arrived. In any other event I should have had great pleasure in rendering any little assistance in my...
Your very obliging and gratifying favor of the 17th of this month, with all its accompaniments, was safely received, and I have to return my particular acknowledgments for your goodness in sending them. The letter from Ghent was like all other letters from the same pen, and I have no higher commendation to bestow upon it. It would have increased, beyond measure, the value of your favor to me...
The last kind favor that I had from you, mentioned your indisposition, and as it is a great while since, I am not without my apprehensions that you may be still unwell. Out of your own immediate family there is no one, sir, in America, or the world, who feels a livelier interest in your health and happiness than I do. I know how old you are in service, in honors, and in years. But years of...
R. Rush presents his compliments to M r Jefferson , and begs he will do him the honor to accept the little pamphlet herewith sent. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “M r Jefferson”; endorsed by TJ as received 25 Oct. 1815 and so recorded in SJL . Enclosure: Rush, American Jurisprudence, written and published at Washington, being a few reflections suggested on reading “Wheaton on...
I received, yesterday, your favor of the 31. of last month , and beg leave to return my warm thanks for your kind and obliging sympathy on the melancholy occasion of the death of my father . Few men, I believe, who have lived ever acted up more faithfully to what he took to be the line of rectitude and duty in all the actions of his laborious life; but in whatever lights he may have appeared...
I have taken the liberty to copy for your eye the enclosed lines, written by St George Tucker of Virginia, on being asked why he had ceased to court the inspirations of the muse. They struck me as very touching and beautiful both as to sentiment and manner. If you have not seen them before, perhaps they may afford you a few minutes pleasure; and the hope that they may do so has induced me to...
If I have detained the enclosed letter longer than was proper, I beg it may be ascribed, not to any insensibility to the favor done me in being allowed its perusal, but to a desire to turn it to the uses that it appeared to me to deserve. After showing it to the President, I took the liberty of reading parts of it to two of the members of his cabinet, that sentiments so important, coming from...
Nothing has transpired since I last wrote, except the arrival of Commodore Rodgers from Baltimore yesterday afternoon. He mentions that the travelling party reached that city on tuesday evening, in the steam boat he believes. They took up their abode at Barneys. He adds, that Lucien Bonaparte is known to possess stock in some of the institutions of Baltimore, and that it was conjectured Joseph...
Employing myself during the past month in arranging papers, I laid my hands upon the enclosed, written at the time it bears date. I am induced to send it for the mere sake of what it contains about Bonaparte; not, indeed, that we can subscribe to all it says, but that as his character seems to go on evolving new anomolies, its confident assertions about him as far back as the days of...
The extraordinary juncture of publick affairs emboldens me to trouble you with this letter, and while I do so with great diffidence I must seek the apology in the motive and proceed to its immediate subject with no other claim to indulgence beyond that which the subject, coupled with the most ardent desires for our countrys welfare, can beget. The shock given to the publick hopes in the...
While the military nominations are under consideration, I have ventured to think that it would not be unwelcome to the executive to receive, from every source, information in regard to characters in our country who may have pretensions in this line. Under this impression I took the liberty, a few days ago, to hand to the secretary of war a paper of which the enclosed is a copy. It is with his...
I lose no time in returning the enclosed letters, which came to hand to day, and for the perusal of which I beg leave to make my very sincere and cordial thanks. Such letters, from such a source, are a treat. It is the next thing to being in Europe, perhaps better in such times as these, and I am very thankful for the kind favor of being allowed to have them a little while in my possession. I...
As a little exercise of the pen, I have just been throwing out a small pamphlet, of a copy of which I beg your acceptance. While at the bar, I had often occasion to perceive and lament the existence of a spirit too dependent and colonial. This little tract aims, as far as it goes, at showing that it is not justifiable. I was happy to hear from Mr Monroe a day or two ago, that his health is...
There are so many motives for visiting Monticello , that it is no wonder all are ambitious to do so. M r Derby , a gentleman of Boston and greatly in esteem among those who have the pleasure of his acquaintance, desires to pay his respects to you, and I know how largely I shall promote his gratification in thus affording him an opportunity. Inducements more than common, operate with M r Derby...