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Having received the commission of attorney general of the United states which you have been pleased to confer upon me, I have the honor to signify, respectfully, my acceptance of it. Amidst the sensibilities I feel at so signal a mark of confidence at your hands I can only say, that I am enabled to sustain the sense of responsibility it implies by nothing else than a consciousness of the good...
I have given the above extract exactly as I find it in a book of my venerated parent that I have just been reading, and which is full of interesting anecdote. I avow it in part as my motive, that I may ask you what toast you would give now if I had the happiness of being in your company at Quincy. That we shall have to fight longer is, as I intimated to you a few days ago, highly probable. The...
I had the honor of your favor of the 14th of last month enclosed to me by Mr Smith, and upon this, as on all other occasions, was gratified at the receipt of it. There was also one for Mrs Madison, which I will take great pleasure in presenting to her, as soon as she returns to Washington. She is now expected in the course of a few days. I most sincerely hope, that the wishes of Mr John Adams...
In further answer to your favor of the 20th of last month, I beg leave to say, that I have just returned from the visit I talked of making to Philadelphia. I find it to be as decidedly the opinion of my mother and brothers, as I confess it was my own, that my fathers letters should not be given up for the press. If, therefore, you should write to Doctor Mease, may we venture to ask it of your...
Since the receipt of your letter of the 19th instant I have dropped a line to Mr Yates, and been with Mr Graham upon the subject of it. The case is, I hope, placed in a way to be satisfactorily adjusted. I enclose another letter from Mr. Dick. The accompanying documents to which he alludes, I have not thought it necessary to trouble you with. It does appear to me, that his sensibility has been...
I have just been favored with your confidential letter of the 11th instant, and will lose not a moment in adopting every possible precaution calculated to give effect to its just wishes. I am astonished at the gross indiscretion that could have dictated or permitted the measure, and you may confidently trust to its being defeated. With very cordial respect &c RC ( PHi : Richard Rush Papers).
R. Rush presents his affectionate respects to Mr Adams, with the hope that Mrs Adams and himself are both well. He begs the favor of Mr Adams to present to Mrs A. the enclosed letter. On his return to this shabby village the day before yesterday after a month’s absence on a visit to beautiful Philadelphia, R. R. had the pleasure to find Mr Adams’s favor of the 26th of April, sealed with a...
The Edinburgh review reached me safely. I had read the article on the corn laws, but confess the explanation of the puzzle did not strike me. In the pencil marks it looks very simple. I suspect the reviewers took their theory from no less an authority than Smith; not that I have particularly searched this time to ascertain, but that I have observed in all their disquisitions which touch...
On Sunday last I saw the President, and he mentioned to me that not a single line had been received from our commissioners in Russia since they left the U. States. He spoke of it with surprise, and seemed at a loss to account for it, unless some dispatches from them had miscarried, as it is near eight months since they went away. Yesterday he mentioned to me in conversation, that, by the late...
I have sent on to Philadelphia the papers which accompanied your favor of the 20th instant. I had not been unmindful of the request intimated in your previous favor of the 12th, upon the same subject, and was upon the point of drawing up a few remarks in relation to it when that of the 20th arrived. In any other event I should have had great pleasure in rendering any little assistance in my...
Your very obliging and gratifying favor of the 17th of this month, with all its accompaniments, was safely received, and I have to return my particular acknowledgments for your goodness in sending them. The letter from Ghent was like all other letters from the same pen, and I have no higher commendation to bestow upon it. It would have increased, beyond measure, the value of your favor to me...
The last kind favor that I had from you, mentioned your indisposition, and as it is a great while since, I am not without my apprehensions that you may be still unwell. Out of your own immediate family there is no one, sir, in America, or the world, who feels a livelier interest in your health and happiness than I do. I know how old you are in service, in honors, and in years. But years of...
R. Rush presents his compliments to M r Jefferson , and begs he will do him the honor to accept the little pamphlet herewith sent. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “M r Jefferson”; endorsed by TJ as received 25 Oct. 1815 and so recorded in SJL . Enclosure: Rush, American Jurisprudence, written and published at Washington, being a few reflections suggested on reading “Wheaton on...
I received, yesterday, your favor of the 31. of last month , and beg leave to return my warm thanks for your kind and obliging sympathy on the melancholy occasion of the death of my father . Few men, I believe, who have lived ever acted up more faithfully to what he took to be the line of rectitude and duty in all the actions of his laborious life; but in whatever lights he may have appeared...
I have taken the liberty to copy for your eye the enclosed lines, written by St George Tucker of Virginia, on being asked why he had ceased to court the inspirations of the muse. They struck me as very touching and beautiful both as to sentiment and manner. If you have not seen them before, perhaps they may afford you a few minutes pleasure; and the hope that they may do so has induced me to...
If I have detained the enclosed letter longer than was proper, I beg it may be ascribed, not to any insensibility to the favor done me in being allowed its perusal, but to a desire to turn it to the uses that it appeared to me to deserve. After showing it to the President, I took the liberty of reading parts of it to two of the members of his cabinet, that sentiments so important, coming from...
Nothing has transpired since I last wrote, except the arrival of Commodore Rodgers from Baltimore yesterday afternoon. He mentions that the travelling party reached that city on tuesday evening, in the steam boat he believes. They took up their abode at Barneys. He adds, that Lucien Bonaparte is known to possess stock in some of the institutions of Baltimore, and that it was conjectured Joseph...
It is no interference with my publick employments to write to you. I can command some portion of almost every day, and the priviledge of using it in this way is most gratifying to me. Michiavel says war ought to be the only study of a prince. We shall indeed, Sir, be taught, by terrible experience, that it must henceforth be more the study of our republick. One of our Colonels told me not long...
Remarks upon Commodore Patterson’s letter to the secretary of the navy, dated New Orleans, August 15. 1816. There is no ground for considering the property taken possession of by the naval or military officers of the United States, after the destruction of the fort on the Apalachicola, on the 27th. of July 1816, as prize of war. Prize of war must be the result of some lawful belligerent act....
I was made happy by your last esteemed favor, from its assuring me that your health was restored to its usual tone. I lately spent an evening with young Mr Dallas, who came home in the John Adams. He is an intelligent young gentleman, and deals out a great deal of European anecdote, of Lords and Emperors, Kings and princes. He speaks with nothing but praise of Mr J. Q. Adams; who, he says, was...
Employing myself during the past month in arranging papers, I laid my hands upon the enclosed, written at the time it bears date. I am induced to send it for the mere sake of what it contains about Bonaparte; not, indeed, that we can subscribe to all it says, but that as his character seems to go on evolving new anomolies, its confident assertions about him as far back as the days of...
In an accidental conversation I had with Mr Gallatin in the course of the last week upon the subject of men in Pennsylvania fitted for the higher posts of the army, the name of General Thomas Craig, of Northampton county, was mentioned. Without any personal acquaintance, I could only speak of him through his long reputation as a soldier and patriot. His advanced age was adverted to, as well as...
The extraordinary juncture of publick affairs emboldens me to trouble you with this letter, and while I do so with great diffidence I must seek the apology in the motive and proceed to its immediate subject with no other claim to indulgence beyond that which the subject, coupled with the most ardent desires for our countrys welfare, can beget. The shock given to the publick hopes in the...
While the military nominations are under consideration, I have ventured to think that it would not be unwelcome to the executive to receive, from every source, information in regard to characters in our country who may have pretensions in this line. Under this impression I took the liberty, a few days ago, to hand to the secretary of war a paper of which the enclosed is a copy. It is with his...
I am of opinion the seventh additional article of the constitution, which provides that "no person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual service in time of war or publick danger, ” does not exclude the jurisdiction of courts...
I lose no time in returning the enclosed letters, which came to hand to day, and for the perusal of which I beg leave to make my very sincere and cordial thanks. Such letters, from such a source, are a treat. It is the next thing to being in Europe, perhaps better in such times as these, and I am very thankful for the kind favor of being allowed to have them a little while in my possession. I...
As a little exercise of the pen, I have just been throwing out a small pamphlet, of a copy of which I beg your acceptance. While at the bar, I had often occasion to perceive and lament the existence of a spirit too dependent and colonial. This little tract aims, as far as it goes, at showing that it is not justifiable. I was happy to hear from Mr Monroe a day or two ago, that his health is...
There are so many motives for visiting Monticello , that it is no wonder all are ambitious to do so. M r Derby , a gentleman of Boston and greatly in esteem among those who have the pleasure of his acquaintance, desires to pay his respects to you, and I know how largely I shall promote his gratification in thus affording him an opportunity. Inducements more than common, operate with M r Derby...
Mr Ingersoll has sent me on the enclosed letter from Philadelphia, which, for the sake of the sentence it contains about impressment, I venture to enclose for your eye. Mr Ingersoll is not, as Mr King supposes, engaged in any publication upon this subject. He is investigating it, with others, preparatory to his congressional career, which I please myself with the hope will be prominent and...
Mr. Dallas, Mr. Crawford and myself met yesterday upon the business relative to the capitol. It struck us, that, under the act of congress of the 29th. of April last, the executive possesses authority to sanction the encroachment upon the centre building, to give room for the stair-way contemplated by Mr. Latrobe. Touching the expediency of such a measure, we found a resolution of the senate...
Your valued favors of the 5th and 10th, have gratified, instructed, and consoled me. As far as I stand informed, the administration have never dreamed that the war, or the treaty of Ghent, diminished the nicest hair of our rights to the fisheries, as we have ever before enjoyed them. On the 10th of November 1814, the joint mission wrote to the British commissioners exactly as follows—“In...
I had hoped that this letter would have shaped itself by some of the agreeable topicks touched in your two most agreeable favors of the 5th and 20th; the former of which my better half has put into one of her own drawers claiming it as her own property and desiring her most dutiful compliments and acknowledgements for the handsome things said of her; and the latter of which I received...
I have never seen Mr Madison so well fixed any where as on his estate in Virginia , not even before he was burnt out here. His house would be esteemed a good one for any of our country seats near Philadelphia , and is much larger than most of them. The situation is among mountains, and very beautiful. A fine estate surrounds him, at the head of which he appears to eminent advantage, as well in...
I beg you will do me the honor to accept a Copy of a discourse I delivered on the 4th of July at this place. The present crisis of our country, sir, is most momentous; but it seems greatly to be feared that the powerful and intelligent state of Massachusetts will not yield her zealous cooperation to the nation in its present struggle. With constant wishes for your health and happiness allow...
It would have been a greatr gratification to me if I could have announced to you before this time the actual appointment of Mr John Adams Smith, as secretary to the Legation at London. I have, however, great pleasure in saying that I believe but one thing is wanting to it. Mr Monroe, who yesterday favored me with a conversation upon the subject, did not hesitate to say, that he feels “a...
I find, from a conversation with Mr Monroe, that it is not the intention of government to send dispatches to Spain by the Chippewa, or to employ her, in any other way, as a dispatch vessel. Hence the rumour adverted to in your favor of the 28th ulto. must, it would seem, have originated in some mistake. I ought to have transmitted this information some days earlier, and beg leave to apologize...
After having read, for a fifth time, the elegant letter of Mr. J. Q. Adams, I return it with renewed thanks; and as in the postscript to your favor of the 6th instant I think I recognise the hand writing of Mrs Adams, I must beg my respectful compliments and thanks to her also, to whom I feel indebted in part for the pleasure and benefit of perusing the letter in question. And next, sir, for...
For the first time since I was a lad, I have been making an excursion this season. Health and recreation were the double motive, though I am glad to say the latter predominated. I set out on horseback for the mountains in Virginia. I had never been into the antient dominion before, except merely upon its edge. Although it is filled with “Blenheims,” and “Hagleys” and “Mount Airys.” I was still...
I have to offer many apologies for detaining so long the letters you were kind enough to put into my hands , and which I now return. When I got back from my short, though most pleasant and gratifying excursion as far as Monticello , I sent them on to Philadelphia . Intending to go there in the course of the autumn, I did not ask that they should be transmitted back to me, preferring to bring...
Encouraged by the very flattering permission you have given me, I am venturing to say to you in the form of a letter, (a liberty which I hope you will pardon,) that I have read the “review of the works of Fisher Ames.” And I must be allowed to say, that I have read it with the pleasure naturally belonging to the perusal of so able a performance. Although I carefully treasure up every thing...
After thanking you, most cordially, for the affectionate interest you have taken in my late indisposition, I must now say that I have happily gotten rid of all my complaints. Daily rides and walks this fine weather, with fish, oysters, and other good things in moderation, are fast giving me my usual strength. I hope soon to be better than ever. The Jesuits bark I hope I shall be able to do...
I think I must have been the debtor. But be that as it may, I seized, with equal avidity and delight the letter that had upon it the well-known and always welcome Quincy post mark and the commencement of which flattered me so much. Time and knowledge are powerful agents in working upon the judgment. I never knew Mr Dexter until the last supreme court. I had, indeed, seen him before, conversed...
Mr Hay is the son in law of Mr Munroe, and the day after I received your last favor I took the liberty to read a passage from it to the latter. This morning he requested of me an extract of it to send to Mr Hay, saying that he knew how highly it would gratify him. I ha ve cheerfully consented. Thus, Sir, while your kind correspondence is a source of pleasure and of pride to me, I make it also...
Grattan said of Burke lately, “that he had read more than all mankind, and that his command of history gave him the powers of prophecy.” I do not say it idly, sir,—I say it because I believe it,—the book of history lies more open to you than to any individual, at least, on this side of the water. Pray what is to be the end of the great scenes that are passing? What is to become of poor France?...
I cannot refrain from the expression of my most hearty congratulations to you on the auspicious news of peace. It comes, indeed, at a most happy point of time for our interests and our fame. I must be allowed to say, how largely I participate in the just and grateful joy it must bring to all your publick feelings. Your anxious moments, sir, will now be fewer; your labors abridged; your...
The enclosed papers have just been sent on to R. Rush by this days southern mail, and he loses not a moment in forwarding them to Mr Adams, with renewed apologies, with renewed thanks, with cordial respects and compliments, with a hope that they will find him in his usual health. His mother also, under whose roof he now has the happiness to be a guest for a few days, desires that he will make...
A day or two before I had the pleasure to receive your last valued favor of the 3rd of February, the governor of this state was pleased to honor me with the commission of Attorney general. It so happened that, at that moment our criminal courts here were upon the eve of sitting, which suddenly threw upon me a good deal of publick business. This is the chief cause to which I owe the loss, until...
I have complied with the requests contained in your letter of the 17th. instant. To Mr Dick I wrote yesterday. As regards the French letter from Rhode Island, the former one, to which it refers, does not appear to be in either of the departments mentioned. I have, however, enclosed the one you transmitted, to Mr Dallas, with some further though slight explanation of the transaction derived...
I am here on a visit of a few days to my remaining parent, enjoying as much happiness as a son can, under her kind roof. I am sure it will afford you pleasure, madam, to hear that her health is perfectly good, and her situation in all things comfortable and happy. Hearing me say I intended to write to you, she requested that I would present to you her affectionate and cordial remembrance....
I had before observed, in the newspapers, some account of the affair of which Judge Tucker’s letter speaks more particularly. I doubt, from the state of the facts which he exhibits, if the case can be reached with any effect unless under the act of June 5. 1794. There may be difficulties even under this act. The pamphlet which I beg leave to enclose, will serve to show the footing upon which...