You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Rives, William Cabell

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 7

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Rives, William Cabell"
Results 1-41 of 41 sorted by editorial placement
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I beg leave to present to you the Revnd Mr. Jasper Adams, Principal of the Charleston College in South Carolina, a gentleman highly commended to me for his learning & worth by those who have the pleasure of his acquaintance. Mr. Adams proposes a visit to our University, & on his way thither, is desirous of paying his respects to you. With my best salutations to Mrs. Madison, I beg you to...
As the period for the meeting of the visitors of the University is now near at hand, I take the liberty to remind you of your promise, & of our hopes, that, on your way thither, you will do us the favour to spend a day with us. We hope that Mrs. Madison will find, in the pleasure her society would afford to numerous friends in this county, a sufficient inducement to accompany you; & in this...
I had hoped to have had it in my power, before this time, to be at Montpelier; but having been deprived of that pleasure by a recent absence of four or five weeks from home, I trouble you with this communication only to say to you that we shall hope to have the pleasure of seeing you here, on your way to the university. If it should not consist with your arrangements to spend a day or two with...
Major Hamilton arrived here yesterday, & I had the pleasure, to-day, of placing in his hands the letter for him, which you committed to my care. Since the receipt of your obliging letter of 20th instant, for which I take this occasion to make you my acknowledgments, I have read, with equal pleasure & instruction, your two letters, recently published in the National Intelligencer, on the powers...
The heavy pressure of some public duties here recently, & the occupation of my mind, at the same time, with some painful circumstances of a private nature, have prevented me from heretofore making my acknowledgments to you for the two interesting letters, with which you favoured me in the course of the last month. I had, previously to the receipt of your last communication, investigated the...
It gave me great pleasure, on my return from Washington some days ago, to hear that your health had very much improved. I trust it is now nearly re-established. I found on my arrival in Washington that there would be profitable employment for me among the archives of the State Department for several weeks, & I concluded, therefore, to return home, (after a few days spent in looking over the...
Since my arrival here, I have endeavoured to obtain all information respecting the character, designs & claims of Mr. Cooley, (whose letter & papers are herewith returned), that I thought likely to be interesting or useful to you. The impression here is very far from being favorable to him, in any of these regards. The Government is thoroughly possessed with the conviction that his claim is...
It is a great sacrifice & disappointment to us to pass so near you, without having it in our power to pay our respects to Mrs. Madison & yourself. We are travelling in the public stage, with a brood of little ones doubled in number since we had the pleasure of seeing you, & with a cumbrous accumulation of baggage, which render a deviation from the highway entirely impracticable for us. We are...
I take the liberty, at the moment of leaving here, to send you a printed sheet containing some observations made by me on a recent occasion of considerable interest in the Senate. It is not, without great diffidence, that I submit any attempt of mine to interpret the true doctrines of ’98 & ’99, & the just theory of our constitution, to the discriminating view of their founder; an indiscretion...
I have trusted to your goodness to suggest the existence of involuntary & uncontrolable causes for the delay which has occurred in acknowledging your kind & most gratifying letter of 12th ult. Immediately after the adjournment of congress. I went to join my family in the county of Nelson, where I had not yet seen, since my return to the country, a numerous circle of friends & relations. In...
The long continued rains have, for the last fortnight, deprived us of the pleasure of our contemplated visit to Montpelier, & the horrible state in which they have left the roads compels us, with regret, still to postpone it, for a few days. We look forward, however, with confidence, to the enjoyment of this satisfaction, in the course of the next week. In the mean time, I send you, in the...
I found it a matter of more difficulty than I anticipated to procure a pamphlet copy of Mr. Tyler’s Speech, which I have now the pleasure to send you. After repeated ineffectual searches for it among my own collections of the last winter, & the failure of other efforts to obtain a copy, I, at length, wrote to a friend in Washington, who with difficulty procured that, which I am much gratified...
Permit me to introduce to you my friend Dr. R. C. Mason, a gentleman of distinguished intelligence & patriotism residing in the county of Fairfax, who is desirous of paying his respects to you, & at the same time, of presenting to you his friend Mr. R<...> of Philadelphia. Dr. Mason, you will doubtless recollect, is the gentleman who received so flattering a testimony of the high estimation of...
I had the satisfaction, on the eve of our departure for the Springs, to receive your kind letter of 2nd Aug. Having just returned home, I avail myself of the earliest moment to express to you the great pleasure I derived from the intimation it contained of your purpose to point to the errors of Mutius & others in their views of a political career, which had conferred so many inestimable &...
The constant hope, from day to day, of being able to make the visit to Montpelier, on which Mrs. Rives & myself have so long set our hearts, has prevented me from troubling you with a written acknowledgment of your most valuable favour of 21st ult. It has so happened, however, that an uninterrupted series of detentions, arising chiefly from the calls of friends, has as constantly occurred to...
I beg leave to present to you my friend Mr. Niles, who was associated with me as Secretary of Legation during my residence at Paris, & was afterwards our Chargé d’affaires there. After spending a few days with us, he is now on his way to the North, preparatory to his return to Europe, & would deem his visit to Virginia altogether unsatisfactory & illusive, without an opportunity of paying his...
I desired very much to have had the pleasure of paying my respects to yourself & Mrs. Madison on my way to Washington, but the necessity of my being there with as little delay as possible & the almost impassable state of the roads, (which has compelled me to leave Mrs. Rives behind, to follow me when she can), have deprived me of that satisfaction. It has given me great pleasure to learn that...
Lieut. Hudson of the Navy has just given me in charge for you the enclosed Diploma of Honorary Membership of the United States Naval Lyceum, which, admitting of convenient transmission thro’ the mail, I have now the honor to forward to you. We have seen, with great concern, from some recent notices in the news-papers, that your health, of late, has not been as good as usual. I trust, however,...
An unexpected call from my friends has rendered it necessary for me to leave this neighbourhood before your return from Bedford . In consequence of this event I am prevented from delivering that portion of your books, which I have already read. I intend, however, to return after a few days, when you shall receive them.—Permit me, sir, to avail myself of this opportunity of expressing the...
You will receive from the bearer of this note the books, whose names are subjoined.— I have read Dalrymple on Feudal property, but as a recurrence to it may sometimes become necessary, I have retained it.—It was my wish to have waited on you this morning, but preparations for my departure from Milton , and the constant expectation of the stage’s arrival, detain me here. 2 nd Vol. Kennets Hist....
W. Rives offers his most respectful compliments to Mr. Jefferson, & informs him that he is at present unable to communicate the precise amount of the costs of Mitford’s Greece & Mrs. Macauley’s England , but will procure the agent of Brown & Rives in this place to obtain a particular statement of them from the house in Richmond . The manner in which Mr. Jefferson proposes to discharge these...
Since I had the pleasure of being at Monticello , the unsettled state of my health has totally disqualified me for intellectual exertion. Indeed, for the last two years, either the incapacity resulting from this cause, or the avocations of business have materially obstructed my desire of knowledge, by taking away the physical power of obtaining it.— The former evil being now partially removed...
I present to you mr Rives , the bearer of this, an eleve of mine in law and politics. he is able, learned, honest, & orthodox in his principles. being just about to enter on the stage of public life he wishes first to see something more of our country at large. he will be one of the distinguished men of our state , & of the United States . in taking him by the hand while in Boston you will...
I present to you mr Rives , an eleve of mine in law and politics: honest, able, learned, & true in the holy republican gospel. bestow on him your native kindness, not only for the gratification of your own benevolent dispositions, but to shew him the degree of estimation in which you hold your RC ( DLC : William C. Rives Papers); addressed: “The honorable John Langdon Portsmouth by mr Rives.”...
The bearer mr Rives , the son of one of our wealthiest citizens and of the neighboring county of Amherst , is an eleve of mine in law & politics. before he commences practice he wishes to visit the country North of us. an honester, abler, or better informed man could not be presented to you. make him sensible of my high estimation of him by the kind offices which you as my friend may render...
This will be handed you by mr Rives a young gentleman of this state and my neighborhood. he is an eleve of mine in law, of uncommon abilities, learning and worth. when you and I shall be at rest with our friends of 1776. he will be in the zenith of his fame and usefulness. before entering on his public career he wishes to visit our sister states and would not concieve he had seen any thing of...
Altho’ I have not had the honor of a personal acquaintance with you, yet our respective public duties have heretofore produced an intercourse of letters which rendering us not entire strangers furnish the grounds of addressing this letter to you. it will be handed by mr Rives , a young gentleman of this state, an eleve of mine in the law, of great abilities, learning and worth, and one who...
I have it in my power to congratulate you, at last, on an event, which constitutes a proud epoch in the history of Virginia . The Bill for the establishment of an University at the Central college was passed on yesterday in the House of Delegates by a majority of 141 to 28. Altho’ the previous votes taken in the committee of the whole had left little doubt as to the final success of the...
I had the pleasure of receiving, thro’ Col. Randolph , last evening, your kind invitation for myself & my wife to spend the day at Monticello . I regret very much that arrangements previously made, involving the convenience of others as well as ourselves, prevent us, at this time, from paying you a visit, which my own feelings would have promptt prompted me to do, without an invitation. But we...
It is a source of sincere gratification to me to be enabled to communicate to you the passage by both branches of the Legislature, of the Bill authorising a loan of sixty thousand dollars to the University. It passed our House by a majority of two to one, & the senate by a still more triumphant vote, leaving but three in the minority. This is certainly a most auspicious indication, & puts the...
It affords me great pleasure to inform you that the temper of the present Legislature, so far as it can be collected from conversation with its members, is one of improved liberality towards the University. The great difficulty we have to encounter is a repugnance on the part of many gentlemen, otherwise friendly to the University, to undertake, at this time, the erection of the additional...
A number of your friends and neighbours intend to celebrate the approaching Anniversary of their country’s Independence at M r D. Fitch’s in Milton; and the undersigned committee of arrangements, in compliance with the wishes of those by whom they were appointed, respectfully invite your attendance. In doing so they feel it unnecessary to express to you the high gratification it will afford...
I take the liberty of introducing to your acquaintance my brother Robert, who is one of the representatives of the county of Nelson in the next Legislature. He is on a visit to the University, to inspect the plan & condition of that noble establishment, & will be much gratified in the opportunity, which a personal interview will afford, of learning the views of it’s patron & founder.— MHi .
Your invitation to Monticello, to-day, has just overtaken me on my return home, & I regret exceedingly that my state of health is such, this morning, as to prevent my gratifying the feelings I cherish towards Gen l La Fayette & yourself alike, by the acceptance of it.— MHi .
I had the pleasure of receiving, a day or two ago, your letter of 25 th instant on the subject of the duties wrongfully demanded of the University on it’s late importation of marble from Italy, accompanied with a series of papers, numbered from 1 to 15, supplying the necessary evidence in support of the application intended to be made to congress for the remission of these duties. I beg leave...
Your letter of 30 th ult. was duly received & I availed myself of the earliest opportunity of conferring with the Postmaster-General, in relation to the subject of it. He suggested some objections to the establishment of a post-office at the University, & in lieu of it, proposed an arrangement which, if it should take effect, it is hoped, will attain all the ends you had in view—that is, to...
I had the pleasure of receiving your letter of 8 th instant, by the last mail, in reply to which I have to inform you that the committee of ways & means, to whom the application on behalf of the University was referred, reported, some time ago, a Bill remitting the whole amount of duties charged upon the late importation of manufactured marble for the use of the University. This Bill, in the...
I beg leave to introduce to your acquaintance Messrs. Johnson, , & Ashley, members of the House of Representatives from the State of New-York, who, in a visit they are about to make to Virginia, are desirous of paying their personal respects to you. You will find them gentlemen of great respectability, & of liberal sentiments.—I take the occasion to renew to you the expression of my grateful &...
You will perceive from the enclosed letter of Mr. Lambert that he has presented to the University of Virginia, thro’ me, a printed copy of the calculations made by him to ascertain the longitude of the Capitol in this City. I beg leave to commit these calculations, together with the letter which accompanied them, to your guardianship, that you may dispose of them in such manner as is most...
I had the pleasure of recieving your letter of 22 nd ult. some days ago; but unwilling to vex & tire you with the repetition of unsatisfactory communications, I have forborne to reply to it, until I could communicate something decisive upon the subject of the duties. I have now the satisfaction to inform you that the Bill, for remitting them, has this day passed the House of Representatives, &...
I have now the satisfaction to inform you that the Bill, for remitting the duties demanded of the university, has passed the Senate, & has probably, by this time, received it’s consummation as a law by the signature of the President. The committee of the Senate, to which the Bill was referred, reported it with an amendment, the object of which was to provide for another case supposed by the...