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We rec’d. your two letters of the 22d. Feb. on the 3 inst. and that of the 2d. on the 10th. I have not been able to procure horses for George and Page yet tho’ I have taken very considerable pains myself and they as far as the hurry of the season would permit them have been looking about. There are none worth having in the neighbourhood but many pass along the road from Kentucki, for sale, and...
Mr Lillie has called since last post to request I would explain to you a blunder of John Perrie who wrote the letter for him informing you of the purchases of supplies he had made to be met by remittance from you. The pork was bought of Reuben Burnley alone to am’t. of £:35.6.10 which sum Dr. Wardlaw has paid and written to you to request you would replace it in Philada. for him. Perries...
I have reached this place with so little fatigue to my horses or myself that I shall go on immediately to Strodes in order to fullfill my promise to Martha in my last letter to be at home tomorrow tonight. I beg you to excuse my not going by the Red-house and writing thence an account of the road you wish to try in coming on this time. Something which I did not foresee and could not control...
I am completely happy in being able to inform you that all our little family has passed safely through the worst stage of the Whooping cough: we have no apprehensions now about any of them: the cough has so much abated and all the serious symptoms so long disappeared that we boldly congratulate ourselves on our good fortune. The fourth week was the worst with all: with Cornelia and Ellen it...
Lillie communicated to me, a few days after he had written to you, his intention of leaving Monto. this Autumn. I had never heard a word from him before on the subject although I had learned from others sometime before that he had thoughts of the kind. He says that he finds he is doing nothing for his family which consumes necessarily in the groceries and cloathing he is obliged to buy allmost...
William MacGehe agrees with Thomas Mann Randolph , acting for Thomas Jefferson, that he will serve the said T.J. as Overseer, over not more than twenty hands, upon his plantation where John H. Craven now lives, during the year 1800 and ten, for the sum of fifty pounds in money, six hundred lbs of net pork, seventy lbs of Beef, twelve Barrels of Corn, one Barrel of flour and the priviledge of...
I am confident I could have served you considerably but I thought it better to trust to the motives upon which you depended than risk the consequences of a sudden relaxation of strict command. I scarcely look to the Nailery at all—George I am sure could not stoop to my authority & I hope and believe he pushes your interests as well as I could. The papers with the dispatches from our envoys...
We received your favor of March 31. yesterday and learn with great joy that your next will order your horses—that of the 4th. March I thought I had acknowledged but find it slipped me: those of the 7. & 9. have not yet reached me. I cannot express the feelings your kindness excite: I was really on the point of ruin from my own neglect: I knew all along that I should not have one moment when...
I did not expect to have written by this post as I was much engaged in preparing some papers & in the business of the farm my Overseer being abroad on some affairs of his own, and Martha had written fully this morning. I recollect however now (7 oclock in the Evening) that tis necessary to inform you the Nailery will soon be out of iron if it does not receive a supply from you. George came...
I have to day seen a M r Mauray of this place who has about 4 or 5 quarter casks, of the Scuppernon wine, 2 Yrs. old, which he says he will sell at 87½¢ a Gall. if you take it all, he brought it in from Carolina for a gentleman of Norfolk, who declined takeing it because it is not sweet —It is very different from that I drank at Monticello, I have therefore obtained a bottle which I shall send...