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Judge Claiborne, of the state of Tennessee, has requested me to introduce him to you. He is travelling on to Philadelphia, with a view to solicit the appointment of district-judge in that state under the U. S. Altho’ a young man, his pretensions have been marked by the opinion, prevailing there, of his superiority over his present competitors, who formerly contested with him the seat on the...
19 August 1796, Richmond. Introduces Edwin Burwell. RC ( DLC ). Written on a half-sheet, with signature clipped; a fragment with a Randolph signature was attached before the RC was given to the Library of Congress in 1937. These two pieces are attached to a separate sheet, at the bottom of which is written in an unidentified hand, “To the Hon James Madison / House of Reps. U.S.” A docket on...
The meeting, which I mentioned to you in my last letter, was this day held at the Capitol. Between 3 & 400 persons were present; a large proportion of whom were British merchants, some of whom pay for the British purchases of horses, their clerks, officers, who hold posts under the President at his will, stockholders—expectants of office—and many without the shadow of a freehold....
For reasons, which I assigned to you on our interview near Balto, I have not written to you, since your sojournment at Phila. The inclosed notice presents a subject, not influenced by those reasons. It is a branch of the Phila. system, which underwriters, merchants and the devotees of the administration invariably inforce; and unless counteracted, will throw every thing at their feet. The...
I have forborne to write to you since my resignation, that you might be able to affirm, that in the ground, which I shall take in my appeal to the people, you have borne no part. For among the objects, which the President and his party have in view, one is to destroy the republican force in the U. S. A conspiracy, more deeply laid and systematically pursued, has not yet occurred; and in every...
I affirm to you, that the delay, which has occurred in the arrival of my letter of the 8th instant to your hands, is not to be ascribed to me. It was sent to the post-office on friday the 9th; but too late, I believe, for the mail of that day. If I am not misinformed, it reached Alexandria on Wednesday, the 14th; from whence it was brought back on saturday, the 17th; you having passed thro’...
Until monday last I did not obtain from the office those of my own letters, which I deem proper to be introduced into my vindication. But I still want the inspection of a letter from you, dated July 22. 1795, and received by me. I applied personally at the office on Saturday last for the sight of your letters to me. The Chief Clerk went into the room, in which Mr Pickering sits, to consult...
I returned yesterday from German Town; and this morning I shall proceed to the examination of the necessary papers. Finding it important to one branch of the subject, that I should ask a small addition to the narrative in your letter of the 20th ultimo; I have to request, that I may be informed, as far as may be in your power, when Mr Hammond put Mr Fauchet’s letter into the hands of Mr...
I have this moment received a letter from Colo. Pickering, dated yesterday, informing me, that it was your “desire, that the other copies of the ratification might also receive my signature, as secretary of state at the date of the ratification.” Altho’ for many reasons, this cannot be supposed to be a pleasant business to me; yet to shew to you, that by my resignation I never intended to...
In my letter of the 19th ultimo, I informed you of my purpose to overtake Mr Fauchet, if possible. I accordingly went to Newport in Rhode Island; where I had an interview with him. The abrupt and unexpected sailing of the French Frigate, La Meduse, on the morning of the day, after I arrived there, had nearly deprived me of the object of my journey. But I trust, that I am in possession of such...
Immediately upon leaving your house this morning, I went to the office for the department of state, where I directed the room, in which I usually sat, to be locked up, and the key to remain with the Messenger. My object in this was to let all the papers rest, as they stood. Upon my return home, I reflected calmly and maturely upon the proceedings of this morning. Two facts immediately...
I expected to have the pleasure of seeing you here at the supreme court; when I meant to Enter into, a full conversation with you. But being disappointed, I shall only beg you to read a letter, which I have this day written to Mr. Jay; and requested him to shew to you. If I do not mistake, your ideas and mine were not very different as to the provision-order I am dear sir with real esteem and...
I have forwarded, agreeably to your Excellency’s request, the letter, which you inclosed to me for General Lee. It was always my intention to inform you of the President’s final act on the treaty. This being now taken by an assurance in writing to Mr. Hammond that it would be immediately ratified; and the necessary forms being on the point of completion, little need be added on that head. But...
E. Randolph presents his respectful compliments to the President; and forgot to inform him, that the balance of the money, left by Mr Dandridge has been returned to his credit in the bank; and has been and is ready to the draught of the President or him—The sum left was 350 dollars—Paid to Mr Kit 105—Balance two hundred and forty five dollars. AL , DLC:GW . On this date, Randolph informed the...
Neither the mail of Saturday or yesterday is arrived from the Southward. So that I have no letter from Mount Vernon before me. Our consul at Bristol confirms the existence of the British order for seizing provisions, destined to France, by a letter on the 17th of June last; and many of our vessels have fallen victims to it. Very little is said here about the treaty; and I should not be...
The mail, which was expected on Saturday morning, did not arive until sunday. at least the letters were not delivered before ten o’clock on sunday morning. But no letter came from Mount Vernon. A Mr Lowndes of South Carolina was charged with the enclosed letter, containing the proceedings of the town-meeting at charleston. He gave it to me on saturday last At two o’clock P.M. I requested Mr...
Private. The only letter, which I had the honor of receiving from you by the mail of yesterday, was one written on monday the 27th instant late in the evening. I mention this circumstance, solely because the first paragraph of it renders it possible, that some other had been sent to the Post-office for the same mail. Mr Woolcott, Colo. Pickering and myself agree in the draft of an answer, now...
As soon as I had the honor of receiving your letter of the 24th instant, I conferred with the secretaries of the treasury and of war upon the necessity or expediency of your return hither at this time. We all concurred, that neither the one nor the other existed: and that the circumstance would confer upon the things, which have been, and are still, carried on, an importance, which it would...
Saturday evening was appointed for the last meeting on the treaty in the state-house yard; and five o’clock was the hour. I waited in town until After six, in hopes of hearing the result. But nothing having transpired, I went into the country, where the rumors of the proceeding were very various and extraordinary. I returned last evening, when I found a letter from Mr Hammond, complaining...
I have the honor of inclosing to you a draft, which has been signed by the three other gentlemen. They had prepared drafts, which did not accord with my views, and therefore I was not deterred by any danger of giving offence from offering, that which they have subscribed. I think it best, however to send to you all the drafts; for it is a very difficult and critical subject to write upon....
You will see in Bache’s paper of this morning names upon the committee for preparing the address to you, of a very respectable kind. Whether they were present at the meeting, and whether they will act, I cannot yet learn. Mr McKean is understood, however, to be acrimonious against the treaty beyond measure. I hinted in a past letter, that there was something mysterious in one part of the...
After a very mature consideration, we are unanimously of opinion, that an answer be returned to the papers, inclosed in the letter, which you honored me with from Baltimore on the 18th instant. At first, the sentiments contained in the sketch (No. 1.) seemed to prevail wi⟨th⟩ a majority. But the prospect of more and more popular meetings has converted us all to the idea, that an answer may be...
I am much obliged to you for your explanatory letter to myself, and your permission for my inspection of the two addressed to your Southern correspondent . I had intended to drop you a few lines upon the depending subject. But hearing that you are to be at the Supreme court of the U.S; and not being able to say to you much sooner than the first day of their session, what I wish; it will be...
I do myself the honor of transmitting to you translations of the letters from Mr Jaudenes and Mr Adet; a letter from Colo. Hamilton, opened by his desire, as the note, covering it, will shew; and a proclamation, dated on the 10th instant, being the day, when the amnesty of the insurgents was to commence. I retained Colo. Monroe’s letter, now also inclosed, with a view to examine it a little...
Private I do myself the honor of inclosing to you a letter from Colo. H. It proves, what I suspected, that the first opinion was not maturely weighed. But there is something in the business a little mysterious to me; which I shall examine into, before I write to you upon the occasion. The whole subject is daily increasing in magnitude: The proceedings in Boston, which, as yet, we guess at...
Altho’ you will have seen the commissioners of the Fœderal City, before their inclosed letter reaches Mount Vernon; I have supposed, that it will be better to transmit it to you. Mr Adet has sent me a decree of the national convention; by which they expressly violate our treaty of commerce with France; by declaring that hostile property may be seized on board of neutral vessels, until their...
Since writing a quarter of an hour ago, I find, that by not understanding the French Calendar, I am totally mistaken in my account of the French decree. The French Minister sent me two decrees, one of which is to the effect, mentioned in my other letter. But it is prior to the other, which is of a contrary import, and which until this moment I supposed to be repealed. So that the favorable...
Memorandum. Mr Adet came to the office, and told me, that he had come to express to me in an amicable manner the uneasiness, which the treaty with Great Britain had excited in him. Professing not to have seen it, I promised him a copy, and that day delivered it to him. He stated some days afterwards in writing three objections: 1. that we had granted to Great Britain liberty to seize our naval...
The two questions, which I had the honor of receiving from you on the 29th Ultimo, being preparatory to the measures, which appear to me most adviseable to be pursued, on the late treaty with Great Britain; I shall take the liberty of connecting the whole subject together. Had the senate advised and consented to a ratification in an unqualified manner, the President would have had nothing, but...
E. Randolph has the honor of sending to the President the draft of a letter to Mr Jaudenes in answer to his, respecting the Georgia sales—The papers, which he sent E.R. are (besides his letter, which I read to the President) a letter from the baron de Carondelet, enclosing one from his correspondent in Charleston, and the acts of Georgia translated into Spanish. They all go to the single point...
E. Randolph, with respectful compliments to the President, feeling himself better to-day, has accepted Mr Adet’s proposal of a meeting this morning, which has been deferred by Mr Adet’s indisposition once, his mistake a second time, and E.R.’s disorder a third day —I shall see him at 9 o’clock. Unless the President shall contradict it, Colin Williamson’s letter will be sent to the...
I this morning received the inclosed letter. It relates to a subject, which, notwithstanding the suggestions of Mr King, Mr Burr, Mr Bradford and some other gentlemen, I positively forbid to be mentioned to you. Why I forbid it, the reasons are very, very many; for altho’ the wish of the most respectable of the bar in this city might have seemed to countenance it; yet One reason overpowered in...
E. Randolph has the honor of returning to the President his letter to Mr Johnson with a few pencilled suggestions. The letter from Messrs Scott and Thornton to the President on the 20. April 1795. does not seem to E.R. to be one, which Mr Johnson can require; because it is not an act of the board, directing one thing or another to be done; it is only a comment upon the transaction in general....
Having been in considerable pain during the whole of yesterday, I determined in the evening to send for Dr Kuhn; who from 9 o’clock last night to the present moment has been, and is occupying me with repeated doses, bleedings &c. From the present prospect, I doubt, whether I shall have the honor of seeing you for three or four days. But being still able to attend to business, I shall be ready...
E. Randolph has the honor of informing the President, that he is prevented from waiting on him this morning by a tenesmus in his bowels, which has been very painful to him for four hours, and keeps him constantly on his legs. He is afraid, that it will deprive him of waiting on the President in any other part of the day. It is pretty certain, that the intended outrage in Kensington is...
E. Randolph has the honor of sending to the President the substance of two conversations held to-day —He wishes to record them, and will therefore receive them, with the President’s permission, when he waits upon him tomorrow—As Mrs Adet is to pay her respects to Mrs Washington tomorrow at two o’clock, E.R. will avail himself of the interval, which will be left between her going away, and...
E. Randolph has the honor of suggesting to the President, whether it may not be expedient to take the opinion of the gentlemen in writing on the following points: 1. Is not the resolution of the senate, respecting the treaty between the U.S. and G. Britain, intended to be their final act; or do they expect, that the new article shall be submitted to them, before the treaty takes effect? 2....
The resolution of the Senate is to this import: that the Senate advise and consent to the ratification of the treaty, upon condition, that an article be added to it, which shall suspend so much of the 12th article, as respects the West-India trade: and that the President be requested to open without delay further negotiations upon this head. The expectation of the supporters of this resolution...
The Secretary of State has the honor of transmitting to the President the translation of the German letter, with the original. AL , DLC:GW . This letter has not been identified.
The damage, done to the Ship William of Glasgow, while she was detained by the French Republic, by order of the Executive of the United States, has been estimated at fifteen hundred and eighty dollars. Mr Fauchet being about to be informed, that this has been the case, and my letter to Colo. Monroe going to the same point, I beg leave to request a warrent on the contingent fund to that amount....
E. Randolph has the honor of inclosing to the President the last part of the letter to Mr Fauchet. It was intended to have been much more diffuse; but the intelligence about the memorial makes it clear, that the subject will be there poured forth in folio; and, as he has as yet only fired some scattering shot, it is perhaps better to see the points, to which his battery is directed. There are...
E. Randolph has the honor of sending to the President a letter, just received from Mr Pinckney; and will thank the President to return them as soon as may be convenient; in order that two of the papers (the orders of council) may go this afternoon to the press. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. The two orders in...
E. Randolph has the honor of informing the President, that Dr Way’s presence may be dispensed with at the mint for the few days, which he speaks of. E. Randolph has found a press-copy of the rules, which were fixed in August 1793, subscribed by all the four gentlemen. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. Randolph most...
E. Randolph has the honor of sending to the President two letters, which shew a part of the measures taken to communicate the non-arrival of the treaty—This was suggested by Mrs Jay’s letter. He has also the honor of transmitting a copy of the rule of twenty four hours, and of the notification to the different ministers—It was published in all the newspapers. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous...
The Secretary of State has the honor of laying before the President, two letters received yesterday from mr Hammond, together with the draft of an answer. The Secretary will wait on the President on his return from the Department of the Treasury, to receive his instructions. L , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. Along with...
The Secretary of State has the honor of inclosing to the President the substance of a conversation with Mr Van Berckel on the 20th Ultimo. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. Randolph’s enclosed report of this date reviewed his conversation with Franco Petrus Van Berckel on 20 April, during which they discussed the Dutch...
The Secretary of State has the honor of submitting to the President of the United States a new case, which occurred during his absence, from the minister Resident of the United Netherlands. The documents, connected with the case, and now transmitted are as follows: 1. A commission from the States General of the United Netherlands to Jan Hendrick Christiaan Heineken, bearing date the 17th of...
Consul Bond has just notified me, that he has a draft upon me for 660 dollars, due to-day. I have 400, and am anxious to be precise in time with him. Be so good, as to lend me the remainder of that sum, which I can replace at any moment after tomorrow. RC ( DLC ). Dated 30 Oct. 1794 in the Index to the James Madison Papers , but conclusive evidence for affixing a proper date is lacking....
My mind has been occupied with the subject, upon which we conversed. It is immense, critical, and may form an important epoch. Think precisely & extensively upon it, and let me hear from you. I find, that what I expected to have been done was not. My note in Bond’s hands was paid; but the money was not delivered by the person, who ought to have done it, and consequently the money was advanced...
It shall be done. Put your name upon the check; it is not payable to bearer. RC ( DLC ). Addressed by Randolph. Conjectural date here assigned by comparison with Randolph’s notes to JM concerning his debt to Phineas Bond.