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The President having required the attendance of the heads of the three departments and of the Attorney general at his house on Monday the 25th. of Feb. 1793. the following questions were proposed and answers given. 1. The Governor of Canada having refused to let us obtain provisions from that province or to pass them along the water communication to the place of treaty with the Indians, and...
Feb. 25. 1793. The President desires the opinions of the heads of the three departments and of the Attorney General on the following question, to wit. Mr. Ternant having applied for money equivalent to three millions of livres to be furnished on account of our debt to France at the request of the Executive of that country, which sum is to be laid out in provisions within the US. to be sent to...
If the qualification is to be in private, T.J, A.H H.K and E.R, are of opinion, that Mr. Cushing should administer the oath to the President at his own house, where such officers, or others, as he may notify, will attend. T.J. and A.H. think, that it ought to be in private. H.K. and E.R. on the other hand think, that the qualification ought to be in public: and that the Marshal of the district...
I did not receive the letter, with which you honored me this morning, until my return from the Statehouse at 4 O’clock this afternoon. I determined last night, not to communicate with Mr H——s; because I suspected his own opinion to have a wrong tendency; and I have not been always satisfied, that his conduct has not savoured of management or perhaps cunning. Mr Madison, who knows the other...
Having considered the note of the President of the U.S. to General Knox, on the subject of increased rations; we are of opinion, that a proposition to congress at this time concerning such increase would be inexpedient, even if the question were more free from difficulty, than it is. But liable as it is to objections , the inexpediency of such a proposition now , acquires double force. MS (...
It is our opinion, 1. that the President ought to take the oath in public. 2. that the time be on Monday next at 12 o’clock in the forenoon. 3. that the place be the Senate-chamber. 4. that the Marshal of the district inform the Vice-President, that the Senate-chamber, being the usual place of the president’s public acts, is supposed to be the best place for taking the oath; and that it is...
The President communicated to the Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War and the Attorney General of the United States, a letter from William S. Smith Esqr. of the 28th of February past, to the Secretary of the Treasury, with sundry Papers—No. I. II. III & IV. relating to a negotiation for changing the form of the debt to France; and required their opinion what...
The President communicated to the Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War and the Attorney General of the United States, a letter from William S. Smith Esqr. of the 28th. of February past, to the Secretary of the Treasury, with sundry Papers No. I. II. III and IV. relating to a negotiation for changing the form of the debt to France; and required their opinion...
The only additional inquiry, which I have been able to make, concerning Mr S——l, was from Mr Brown; who thinks that the inclinations of that gentleman are strong towards peace; but that he would not hesitate to contend with zeal for any boundary, which his instructions might prescribe. Indeed, if a doubt of his tendency on this head should be considered as the only objection to him, I suspect,...
Will you be so good as to tell me what answer to give to the interrogatory in the last sentence of this letter? [ Reply by Randolph: ] I do not see any absolute, or indeed probably necessity for the ancient treaties. But I am not certain, that it may not be satisfactory to have those, made with the state governments; since some of the commissioners are new in this kind of business; and might...
My communications to you in the case of Pagan against Hooper, combined with the facts, which have since occurred, will support me in saying, that as the law-officer of the United States, I have contributed every thing in my power to the relief of Pagan. You will recollect, that counsel was employed by him to move for a writ of error: that the first application was refused: that upon...
Letter not found: from Edmund Randolph, 25 Mar. 1793. GW wrote Randolph on 27 Mar. , acknowledging “your letter to me of the 25t[h] inst.”
Would it be amiss to anticipate a suspicion, that the paper, mentioned in the 6th. line, was prepared and reserved for a fit opportunity of disgust? Suppose it to be designated, as an official paper? That the two loans were not consolidated by your opinion does not sufficiently appear. I understand the fact to be, that this was fixed, without calling in your judgment. If the two loans had not...
The question which I had the honor of receiving in your letter of the 20th of March instant, is, Whether certain certificates of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania , originally issued in lieu of Continental certificates, and lately offered to be subscribed to the Loan in State debt, according to the Act supplementary to the Act, making provision for the debt of the United States, can be legally...
Letter not found: from Edmund Randolph, April 1793. GW wrote Tobias Lear on 12 April that the “enclosed from the Attorney General I return to him through your hands.”
I am extremely thankful to you for your readiness to accommodate me on the subject of the bills; but find, that the negotiation of the gentleman, to whom you alluded, was not for me. I must therefore make an arrangement for myself. The sum, which I want to sell, is much less than £2600 stg. It is only 1300 £; as I prefer waiting for a rise. For the money to be raised on this latter sum I Am...
At a Meeting of the Trustees of the Sinking fund, at the Office of the Secretary of State on the 6 of April 1793. Present, The Secretary of State, The Secrey. of the Treasury, and The Atty. Genl. of the U States. It appears by a Certificate from the Register, bearing date this day, that there are at the disposal of the Board 25,445d.76Cts arising from the dividends of Interest payable on the...
You will perceive from the two letters marked A and B, of which I enclose copies, that the subject of Mr. Pagan has been for some time in my view. The former of those letters being intended for you, and containing a summary of facts; I determined to shew it to Mr. Tilghman, who was Pagan’s Counsel, before it was sent to you, in order that he might correct any mistatement. This produced the...
To instruct Governor St. Clair 1. To transmit to Judge Turner any authentic intelligence, which he may have received, concerning the complaints of the people against his absence: 2. Or, if no such intelligence be possessed, to represent to Judge Turner, without undertaking to order in any manner, the inconvenience in a judicial view, which the Territory sustains by his absence: and 3. To...
There is, without doubt, a protection due to foreign built vessels, owned by American citizens ; altho’ they cannot claim the privileges, belonging to Vessels of the U.S. For the former are no less neutral property, than the latter. The usual evidence of the neutral ownership of vessels is a certificate from the officers of the customs; who may and in the papers, granted on clearing out,...
The attorney-general has the honor of reporting to the President, on the questions propounded for consideration, as follows: Altho’ the questions are separately stated; yet are they in general so interwoven in substance, that the discussion of one must frequently run into others. The proclamation has announced the neutrality of the U.S. With this almost every citizen is in unison; and the few,...
I cannot suffer my engagements in business, to interfere with a reply to the observations, with which you favored me, on the proposed letter to the collectors. For while I shall support, within my limited sphere, every just energy of government; I am solicitous, that my friends should ever believe, that I do support it, because it contributes to the essence of republicanism, and our fœderal...
A Perhaps the Secretary of State, revising the expression of this member of the sentence, will find terms to express his idea still more clearly and may avoid the use of a word of doubtful propriety “Contraventions.” B “but be attentive” C “mere” to be omitted D Considering that this Letter will probably become a matter of publicity to the world is it necessary to be so strong? Would not the...
A Perhaps the Secretary of State, revising the expression of this member of the sentence, will find terms to express his idea still more clearly and may avoid the use of a word of doubtful propriety “Contraventions” B “but be attentive” C “mere” to be omitted D Considering that this Letter will probably become a matter of publicity to the world is it necessary to be so strong? Would not the...
The attorney general of the U.S. has the honor of submitting to the secretary of state his opinion concerning the seizure of the ship Grange. The essential facts are, that the river Delaware takes its rise within the limits of the U.S: that in the whole of its descent to the Atlantic ocean, it is covered on each side by the territory of the U.S: that from tide water to the distance of about...
The attorney general has the honor of submitting to the President the following opinion. It appears, that a privateer has been equipped and commissioned at Charleston in South Carolina, under the authority of the French government; and was at the same time manned in part by American citizens: that on the high seas she captured an English vessel; and that both of them are now in the port of...
(Private) [Philadelphia] May 18. 1793. E. Randolph presents his sincere respects to the President. I was from home, sir, on the business of your letter, when you did me the honor of stopping at our house. I really believe, that restitution is the wish of the majority of the merchants. But I find, that they do not distinguish the cases very accurately. Some, when they speak of restitution,...
The 14th. article of our treaty with France has shut out all general reasoning from the law of nations, on the memorial of Benjamin Holland and Peter Mackie. The flour and meal were actually shipped after the declaration of war, made by France on the 1st. of february 1793. If the inquiry was to depend on their knowledge of the declaration, their relief would be very doubtful at least. But as...
Minutes of reasons, which operated with E. R. in advising the expulsion of the Genet privateer. 1. That it is the prerogative of every nation to prohibit acts of sovereignty to be done within its limits by another nation, except where treaties otherwise provide, or those acts relate to the privileges of ministers. 2. That it is the peculiar prerogative of every neutral nation, to prohibit such...
The President of the United States having assembled the heads of the respective departments and the attorney General, laid before them for their advice thereon, sundry communications from the Governor of Georgia, and others, relatively to the recent alarming depredations of the creek Indians upon the State of Georgia. Whereupon after the subject was maturely considered and discussed it was...
The Attorney general of the United States has the honor of submitting to the Secretary of State the following Opinion on the Case of Gideon Henfield, as represented by the Minister of France . 1. It may well be doubted, how far the Minister of France has a right to interfere. Henfield is a citizen of the United States; and it is unusual at least, that a foreign Power should interfere in a...
The return of Warder’s bills under protest has embarrassed me so much, as to make me request the favor of your name to the inclosed. You shall hear no more of it. [ Note by TJ: ] In consequence of the above I endorsed E.R’s note for 1000 D. payable at 60. days sight. RC ( MHi ); with TJ’s note subjoined; addressed: “Mr. Jefferson”; endorsed by TJ as received 30 May 1793. Enclosure not found.
The requisition of departure is, in my judgment, expressed in the most accurate and satisfactory manner possible. It gives me real pleasure to find the strong measure capable of such a softening of feature, while it retains full nerve. Were I to speak for myself, as an individual, I should assent with equal cordiality to the last clause. But I can’t help believing, that it would accord better...
That an Agent be sent to the Choctaw nation to endeavor secretly to engage them to support the Chickasaws in their present war with the Creeks, giving them for that purpose arms and ammunition sufficient: and that it be kept in view that if we settle our differences amicably with the Creeks, we at the same time mediate effectually the peace of the Chickasaws & Choctaws, so as to rescue the...
That an Agent be sent to the Choctaw nation to endeavour secretly to engage them to support the Chickasaws in their present war with the Creeks, giving them for that purpose arms and ammunition sufficient: and that it be kept in view that if we settle our differences amicably with the Creeks, we at the same time mediate effectually the peace of the Chickasaws and Choctaws, so as to rescue the...
Philadelphia, June 4, 1793. “… Inclosed is Mr. Bell’s paper. From Baltimore I shall remit that Sum, which I mentioned to you in part of your kind favor.…” ALS , New-York Historical Society, New York City. For background to this letter, see Randolph to H, April 3, 1793 , and William Bell to H, June 2, 1793 .
That an Agent be sent to the Choctaw nation to endeavor secretly to engage them to support the Chickasaws in their present war with the Creeks, giving them for that purpose arms and ammunition sufficient: and that it be kept in view that if we settle our differences amicably with the Creeks, we at the same time mediate effectually the peace of the Chickasaws & Choctaws, so as to rescue the...
On my arrival at Baltimore, Colo. S. Smith gave me a very early and easy opportunity of conversing with him on the subject of his letter to Colo. Hamilton. He repeated the same alarm, as still existing in the breasts of the merchants; adding, however, a confidence in the executive, as being better qualified to judge, from a comprehensive view of our situation. My explanations were apparently...
Soon after I had the honor of writing to you from Annapolis, I found an occasion of entering into discourse with the governor of Maryland on the subject of our political situation. He appeared to have been caught by the same apprehensions, as had taken hold of the people of Baltimore; and was very minute in his inquiries. Some hours afterwards he called at my lodgings, and in the presence of...
Mr Randolph has the honor of returning to the President Colo. Smith’s letter. Mr R. begs leave to suggest, whether it may not be proper to add to the instruction, to be given to Mr Jefferson concerning Mr Genet’s conduct, that he should state the verbal conversations with him, which respected the granting of commissions within the U.S., and the order, that the privateers, so commissioned,...
Mr. J. rightly supposed, that the approbation of E.R. was by mistake written upon the answer to the letter of the 22d. of June , instead of that of July . The latter is the only one, which attracted my particular attention; as the other seemed to be a subject of future deliberation. The propriety of the addition intended to accommodate Genl. K. depends upon the measures to be pursued in regard...
We have been at cross purposes about the inclosed letter of July 24. 1793. in answer to Mr. Genets of the 9th. I am much mistaken, if my note intimated a doubt of its propriety. I certainly always approved it. My remarks as to delay were applicable to the answer to the inflammatory memorial ; to which General Knox suggested an addition. Is that some word omitted in the first sentence of the...
[ Second Version ] 2. That all equipments of merchant vessels, purely for the accommodation of them as Such be admitted. 3. That all equipments, [vessels armed for merchandize and war with or without commission,] which are doubtful in their nature, being applicable to commerce or war be admitted, except [such] as Shall have made prize of &c as no. 1. A 5. That no equipments of any kind of...
The question, arising upon Mr Lovell’s letter, turns upon the identity of the vessel. If she remain a french bottom, a Register cannot be granted; if she has been converted into an american bottom it may. I shall enter into no subtle disquisition on such an occasion; but shall conform myself to practical ideas. It seems to be agreed in England and Philadelphia, that a vessel of the description...
At meetings of the heads of departments & the Attorney General at the President’s on the 1st. & 2d. of Aug. 1793. On a review of the whole of mr Genet’s correspondence & conduct, it was unanimously agreed that a letter should be written to the Minister of the US. at Paris, stating the same to him, resuming the points of difference which had arisen between the government of the US. & mr Genet,...
The inclosed letter from A. G. Fraunces contains insinuations, which are undoubtedly without grounds, as I verily believe. Still they are of such a nature, as to render it too delicate, to pass them by without notice. On the other hand, the gentleman, who is spoken of, has a title to know a charge, like that expressed in the letter. Permit me therefore to suggest, that the papers be put...
August 3. 1793 The foregoing rules having been considered by us at several meetings, and being now unanimously approved, they are submitted to the President of the United States. DS , in George Taylor, Jr.’s writing, DLC:GW ; copy (letterpress copy), DLC : Jefferson Papers; LB , DLC:GW ; Df , in Alexander Hamilton’s writing, DLC : Jefferson Papers; copy, DNA : RG 46, Third Congress, 1793–1795,...
That The Minister of the French Republic be informed that the President considers the U. States as bound pursuant to positive assurances, given in conformity to the laws of neutrality, to effectuate the restoration of, or to make compensation for, prizes which shall have been made of any of the parties at war with France subsequent to the fifth day of June last by privateers fitted out of...
That the Minister of the French Republic be informed that the President considers the UStates as bound pursuant to positive assurances, given in conformity to the laws of neutrality, to effectuate the restoration of, or to make compensation for, prizes which shall have been made of any of the parties at war with France subsequent to the fifth day of June last by privateers fitted out of their...
1. The original arming and equipping of vessels in the ports of the United States by any of the belligerent parties, for military service offensive or defensive, is deemed unlawful. 2. Equipments of merchant vessels by either of the belligerent parties in the ports of the United States, purely for the accommodation of them as such, is deemed lawful. 3. Equipments in the ports of the United...