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While I acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 10th. instant, I must assign as my apology for forgetting to answer the legal question, that a variety of family sickness has taken away a cool attention to business. The deed, to which the inclosed memorandum relates was executed in France. The following extract from a law of the revised code, intituled an act for regulating conveyances,...
I thank you sincerely for several letters, which my vagrant life between this place and Richmond upon business has prevented me from acknowledging in due season. The amendments, proposed by you, are much approved by the strong fœderalists here and at the Metropolis; being considered as an anodyne to the discontented. Some others, equally affectionate to the union, but less sanguine, expect to...
Your friendly answer to the letter, which I took the liberty of addressing to you in favor of Colo. Heath, has increased the attachment, which your civility to me in 1775, and your public conduct since, first produced My application in that gentleman’s behalf being founded on a conviction of his worth, I conceived, that it might not be improper to make that worth known to all those, who might...
I am told, that within these few days a considerable quantity of Madeira wine has been run into Virginia in the face of day; and that the opinion of the bar is, that neither law nor court exists, which can embrace the case. We shall have a total anarchy in the customs, unless you speedily forward both to us. The impost-bill, we are informed, has been matured into a law. We hear nothing of...
I this morning received your favor of the 15th. In my letter of yesterday, I gave you a faithful narrative of my situation. On further reflection I feel the propriety of the communication more strongly. More confidentially therefore do I repose myself on you. Colo. Parker seems to think (but I am persuaded upon grounds, in no respect tenable,) that the president expects applications from...
Sometime ago Mr Fitzhugh, of Chatham, gave me a list of tickets in Colo. Byrd’s lottery, in which yourself, several other gentlemen, as well as my father or uncle (I forget which) were jointly interested. He promised to procure, if possible, some more authentic grounds for proceeding in the recovery of the prize, and, if I do not mistake, he expected further information from you. I will thank...
The day before yesterday I returned hither from Leesburg. There I was confronted with Mr. Henry, and for three days we lay along side of each other, with our best cannon in action. It was a diverting scene, taken in the whole. My client Chas. Carter must have been defeated, if a single point of four had gone against him; and to obtain one, every thing was tried in the way of assertion,...
I returned home three or four days ago, under the vexatious operation of a quartan. I have been correcting it by medicine and hope in a day or two to subdue it. I shall immediately upon recovering my ability to do business with propriety, enter upon and complete the statement of my introductory ideas in Phila. Yrs. afftely. RC ( DLC ). Docketed by JM.
As soon as I had recovered my attention to business, I entered upon the chastisement of my notes. But I found it impossible to retrace the subject, so as to square with the resolutions proposed, without the possession of those resolutions. But I have them not, except in a mutilated state. Indeed I have an apprehension, that were I to dilate the notes, I should mingle inadvertently much of what...
I am this moment labouring under a violent relapse into the ague and fever, which I supposed to be past; and should not [have] incurred the uneasiness of writing, but to convince you, that the arrangements, made in the higher and subordinate branches of the judiciary department, are sanctified in my judgment by the strictest propriety; and, so far as I am concerned, contain what is probably...
Immediately upon the receipt of your private communication of my appointment, I wrote to you with a head, very much disordered by a fever. As soon as I recovered, I should have written to you again, had I not heard of your tour to the East. By this time I presume you have returned, & therefore beg leave to inform you, that I shall leave Virginia on the 15th of January for New-York. The reason,...
Since my last, written about five days ago, the committee of the whole house have been engaged in the amendments from congress. Mr Henry’s motion, introduced about three weeks past, for postponing the consideration of them, was negatived by a great majority. The first ten were easily agreed to. The eleventh and twelfth were rejected 64 against 58. I confess, that I see no propriety in adopting...
When I had the honor of writing to you last, the amendments had, I believe, been under consideration in a committee of the whole, and ten were adopted, and the two last rejected. Upon the report being made to the house, and without a debate of any consequence, the whole twelve were ratified. They are now with the senate, who were yesterday employed about them. That body will attempt to...
I shall make a statement of my account with Mr. Mazzei, as soon as I return home; and will forward it to you. The encyclopedie I think a bargain, and shall retain it with pleasure. When we meet in N. York, I will pay you the price; stated in your late favor. I thank you for the map; and shall send the other maps, with two catgut battledores, to Mr. Donald. The senate have disagreed to the 3d....
The senate rejected the third, eighth, eleventh and twelfth amendments. The delegates disagreed to that rejection; and yesterday was spent in a conference between the two houses. I am informed, that the senate are determined to receive the 1st 2d 4th 5th 6th 7th 9th and 10th amendments only. This will probably oblige the delegates to give the rest up for the present. But the responsibility for...
Your friendly favor of the 30th Ultimo is this moment delivered to me. My three last letters since the 8th of October have, I hope, been received, and will satisfy you of my having determined to proceed to New York about the 15th of next month. You may be assured, that Mr Wythe neither wished nor expected to be the successor of Mr Pendleton. I will candidly tell you the reason, upon which this...
I returned from the assembly the day before yesterday. Since my last nothing material has occurred in either house; except that the bill is passed, authorizing restitution to be made of Abingdon to Mr Alexander, if you shall approve. I found a fortunate moment for a conversation with Mr Wythe. He repeated what I wrote to you in answer to your favor of the 30th Ulto. Indeed he declared himself...
Letter not found: from Edmund Randolph, 5 Feb. 1790. GW mentions in his 13 Feb. 1790 letter to Randolph “your letter to me of the 5th inst.”
Letter not found: from Edmund Randolph, 10 Feb. 1790. In a letter to Randolph of 10 Feb. 1790 GW refers to Randolph’s letter “of this date.” He again mentions “your letter of yesterday” when writing to Randolph on 11 February.
Letter not found: from Edmund Randolph, 13 Feb. 1790. In a letter to Randolph of 13 Feb. 1790 , GW states “I have received your letter of this morning.”
We arrived last night after much fatigue to ourselves and horses. Indeed I have not been free from a fever since Wednesday last. From the small opporty., which I had, to ascertain the opinion of Phila. on the subject of your motion, I am inclined to believe, that if the holders of securities, the merchants and others, associated with them, or dependent on them, were excluded, the suffrage...
In George Town and Alexa. your discrimination has, as it is said, few advocates. Dr. Stuart was my author concerning the opinions of the latter, Mr. Brook Beall concerning those of the former. But I collected afterward, from Mr. Laurence Washington, that Colo. Geo. Mason was strenuously in favor of your motion; and indeed what I recollect of his observations in convention coincides with this...
After a fatiguing journey we arrived here on sunday evening, when I found all my family well, except my wife, who, I fear, is incumbered with a dead fœtus of more than seven months old. I am endeavouring to ward off by medical aid the consequences of this event. She is now in good spirits, and therefore I trust, that the mischief will not be fatal. Yesterday I saw Colo. Innes. He informs us,...
When I came home, I found my family in a really deplorable condition. Not to mention my children, most of whom were sick, the situation of my wife was very alarming. She gave every symptom of a painful and dangerous abortion being at hand. It is now a fortnight since she was first confined to her room, and every appearance grows more and more critical. It is almost certain, that the fœtus, now...
The governor has reason to expect the death of Colo. Grayson in a short time; and therefore requested Mr. Wm. Nelson to know from me, what you wished, in a case of a vacancy in the senate. I have just written to him, expressing your decided negative. I was diverted yesterday by Mr. John Pierce of James City (the delegate) asking whether you had not become a methodist . After I had recovered...
My dear wife is not better, than when I wrote to you last. I expect something determinate in a few days. Inclosed is a copy of my motion. Had it been intended to bring forward a convention immediately, the thing was imprudently worded; because it contains many unpopular points. But as subjects of reflection for the people, they could not, I thought, be too pointed. I give you a duplicate, that...
I have been looking most anxiously for the second communication, which you promised me, as soon as you should have had an interview with the President. Many times have I endeavoured to break in an easy way to my wife the necessity of my return to N. Y; in order to try her spirits, should I go off. As often has she been thrown into an agitation of real agony. Prepared as I am, I would have...
I thank you for your last favor. It relieved me much. But an event of yesterday has given me a full view of my arrangements. Very unexpectedly a diminished fœtus appeared; manifesting, that it had lost every energy of life for more than four months. The gloom of our house is converted into general satisfaction, at the escape of our friend from the most critical danger. I have this moment...
I have examined the papers which you did me the honor of submitting to me yesterday, on the subject of the Georgia confiscations. But in the present mutilation of the necessary documents, it is impossible for me to form a satisfactory opinion. The act of May 1782 is not among the enclosures of Sir John Temple, but is the groundwork of the proceeding complained of. The last act appears in part...
I beg leave to answer a question which you propounded to me some time ago. Several quarter Masters and other public officers, some with salaries, others with Commissions, have received public Money to disburse for public use. Of this money they were robbed, notwithstanding reasonable care on their part. Are they entitled to an allowance for the sums lost; or must their relief depend on...