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    • Quincy, Josiah, III
    • Quincy, Josiah, III
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I have the honor, by the direction of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences to inclose under cover to your care a number of Copies of the Third Volume of their Memoirs and to request that you would have the kindness to cause them to be delivered conformably to the respective directions. A letter to Dr Rees is also inclosed for which the Academy solicit from you a similar attention. I avail...
In complying with the directions of the American Academy & transmitting the inclosed vote I cannot refrain from expressing my individual pain and regret at the dissolution of a tie which to me has been, always as pleasant as honourable. Be assured, Sir, that I cannot cease to feel or to express the sentiments of esteem and respect with which / I am your hl St At a meeting of the American...
Be assured that I receive, with the sentiments of respect and humility, which I ought the very high approbation, you have been pleased to express of my exertion in behalf of the Navy. I had hoped a different event from that which followed. But what sailors call an undertow sunk our hopes, while they were yet vivid and perfect. The “base and mean and disgraceful motives” of which you intimate...
I received your very acceptable letter of the 20th. and I shall attend to its request with great pleasure. I neither believe that our “ souls ” or our “ marrow ” are to be tried. The only thing to be put to risque is our “ wind ”. “Armour & attitude”, now-a-days mean only what they did in the days of Æolus.—Quâ data porta ruunt—The seas are upturned and the shipping interest annihilated—But...
I have the very great pleasure to acknowledge your favour of the 15th. Inst. Be assured, Sir, that I appreciate the honour of your correspondence; and that it will be a precious reward to cultivate and deserve your esteem and confidence. “The uncertainty of politics” is, indeed, as obvious, as it is lamentable. I cannot, however, unite with you, in applying to it the epithet “glorious.” It is...