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    • Pickering, Timothy
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    • Washington, George

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Documents filtered by: Author="Pickering, Timothy" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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Inclosed is the return of boats which I mentioned this morning. I recd it last evening & have not had opportunity to take a copy. which I shall be glad to do in a day or two. I am very respectfully yr Excellencys obed. P.S. Those mentioned to be laid up at Wappins Creek Mr Sheafe expected to have repaired by this day. DNA : RG 93—War Department.
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President the great bulk of the papers which he has selected to lay before Congress relative to French affairs. Some others remain on which the Secretary is continuing the draft of his letter to Mr Pinckney. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
I received yesterday your Excellency’s letter of the 27th inst. directing the estimates for the ensuing campaign to be prepared. They shall be made out with all possible expedition & laid before you. I have the honour to be with the greatest respect, your Excellency’s most obedt servant DLC : Papers of George Washington.
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President of the U. States the draught of an answer to the Grand Master of Malta. If approved & signed, the Secretary proposes to commit the same to the care of M. Maisonneuve who desires to be Consul at Malta, who forwarded the letter from the Grand Master, and to whom Mr La Colomb (who is settled in Philadelphia) will send the packet by a...
I was honoured with your letter of yesterday’s date, desiring to be informed when the arrangements yet to be made in my department would admit of any return to the army. The Secretary at War being arrived, I expect every matter will be so adjusted as to admit of my leaving town in ten days: it will make me happy if I can sooner follow you. I have the honour to be very respectully Your...
The President will read with pleasure the postscript of the inclosed letter from Robert Montgomery our Consul at Alicante, which I have received this day—excepting what relates to the capture of another American vessel by Tripo li; concerning which however Mr Barlow’s words are consoling. The last sentence broken by the seal I read thus—"I have taken now what I think will be effectual measures...
Colonel Tupper has consented to go to springfield to attend to the transportation of the Cloathing; and now waits on your Excellency for Permission to proceed. Such information and directions as appeared necessary on the occasion I have given to Colonel Tupper in writing. I am with great respect &c. DNA : RG 93—War Department.
Letter not found : from Timothy Pickering, 13 March 1779. GW wrote to Pickering on 20 March : “I have the honor of yours of the 13th instant inclosing a Copy of a letter from Colo. Brodhead with an estimate of the Stores necessary for an expedition against Detroit.”
The Secretary of War respectfully lays before the president four draughts of answers to the popular meetings. Of three there are duplicates; Mr Wolcott having formed draughts varying from those of the Secy of War. His reason is mentioned in the inclosed note. The President will choose the forms which shall best correspond with his own ideas. AL , DLC:GW . The note from Oliver Wolcott, Jr., and...
The conductor whom I sent to Albany with blankets for Colo. Willet’s regiment is returned. He arrived there the 4th before sunset; and has delivered the blankets to Colo. Willet, together with ten guineas which I sent to prevent any little difficulties and delays, which even so small a sum of money might obviate. He has brought no letters for your Excellency. I am, very respectfully, Sir, Your...
The Officers of the part of the Army who agreed on the inclosed address, having committed to us the honor of presenting it. With great pleasure we now offer to your Excellency this testimony of their affectionate attachment & respect. We have the honor to be, with perfect consideration, sir, your Excellency’s most obedient and most humble servants, DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Letter not found: from Timothy Pickering, 3 Dec. 1799. GW’s letter of 24 Nov. to Pickering is docketed by Pickering, “answd Decr 3d.”
The Secretary of State has the pleasure to present to the President a letter received this morning from Colo. Humphreys, by which it appears that Capt. OBrien & hands with the treasure are safe in Tripoli—and that the Dey of Algiers has demanded the delivery on pain of making war: there can be little doubt of the recovery of the money, seeing the Dey considers it as the property of the...
The estimates & information required by your Excellency’s letter of yesterday, I am preparing, and will lay before you in the afternoon, so far as they can be immediately furnished. I have the honour to be with great respect your Excellency’s most obedient servant DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Mr Tilghman favoured me to day with the act of Congress relative to a barrack master to the french Army; agreeable to which I have made the enclosed appointment for Colonel Champlin. If your Excellency shall deem any alteration in the form of the Warrant to be expedient, I beg to be favoured with your sentiments thereon for my direction. I am with great respect your Excellencys most obedt...
Since sealing my letter of this date, my servant has brought me an answer from the Mayor, which I enclose. I am surprized at the number of deaths from Oct. 11th to the 22d. I will continue to advise you of the state of the disease, as often as I can obtain any new information. very respectfully yr most obedt servt ALS , DLC:GW .
Letter not found : from Timothy Pickering, 5 March 1779. GW wrote Pickering on 10 March : “I had the honor of your letter of the 5th Inst. with its inclosures.”
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President the draught of a letter to communicate to Congress the report of the Director of the Mint. His report last year was laid before each house thro’ the Secretary, by the President’s direction. If approved, the present report will be communicated to-day. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
The Secretary of War respectfully informs the President of the United States, that he has been so much occupied as not to be able absolutely to decide on the question which the President did him the honour to propose yesterday for his consideration; and prays the indulgence of a little more time. AL , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW .
Letter not found: from Timothy Pickering, 5 Nov. 1799. GW wrote Pickering on 24 Nov. : “Your favour of the 5th instant came to hand in due course.”
Fearing your patience would be exhausted, I beg leave to hand you so much of my letter to Mr Pinckney as Mr Taylor has copied: he will proceed to complete it with the utmost diligence; but it will probably take him two days to do it. I was the more desirous to submit so much to your inspection, that if you should deem any material changes expedient they might be made with less delay. With the...
The Secretary of State with great pleasure lays before the President of the United States the inclosed letters just received from Colo. Talbot, which confirm the utility of his mission, & the good-will of the British naval officers. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
(private) This morning I received the inclosed letter from Mr Dayton, expressing fully his opinion of Mr Israel Ludlow, whose application for the office of Surveyor General I had the honor lately to transmit to you. While it must be acknowledged that Mr Dayton is perfectly competent to pronounce accurately on the character of a man so well known to him as Mr Ludlow must be, it is proper for me...
The Secretary of State respectfully returns to the President his report on the claims of the Cohnawagas, or Seven Nations of Canada, with the draught of a letter which he thinks proper to go from the department of war, with the report, to the Governor of New-York. The Secretary also transmits a press copy of the report, to be lodged in the war-Office, which will enable the Secretary of War to...
Last Saturday I received a letter from lieutenant governor Wood, and opened it, agreeably to your directions. He declines the office of Surveyor General, as not professionally qualified. The next day I rode to Belmont, to converse with Judge Peters relative to Major Alexander: but he was gone to see his brother Colo. Robinson, at Naaman’s Creek. On Tuesday Judge Peters, as usual, came to town,...
General Hazen has applied to the secretary at war for the articles necessary to equip his regiment. For what regards my department, he is referred to me. I have no difficulty in ordering a supply of every article, tents excepted, which must be brought from the North river; nor should I hesitate about these, if the regiment were certainly to continue any length of time at Lancaster: for they...
I had the honour to receive your Excellency’s letter by Col. Lee, conferring upon me the office of adjutant general: And since, notwithstanding all my objections, ’tis your Excellency’s pleasure, I am happy to declare my acceptance of it. At the same time I am constrained, from my real feelings; again to express my fears that I shall fall short of your Excellency’s expectations. Few people are...
The inclosed letter from Mr Paleski, the Prussian Consul being marked “duplicate,” I suppose the Original may have already fallen under your notice. I thought it proper however to lay it before you: at the same time it appears to be so clear a case, that I have written an answer to Mr Paleski, suggesting that the prolonging of a treaty is tantamou[n]t to the making of a treaty, in which the...
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President of the U. States three papers of nominations. To that respecting the Spanish treaty he wished to have added a name for a commissioner for the spoliations: but is not satisfied about a suitable character. He has examined the Constitution of Pennsylvania & by that, the office of Mayor of Philadelphia, which comprehends the office of a...
It is now time to deposit at West-Point as much wood as will be necessary for the use of the garrison the ensuing winter. If it be practicable to determine, at this time, what shall be the strength of the garrison, and the number and ranks of the officers, I will lay in forage, as well as wood, in proportion, as soon as I am favoured with your Excellency’s decision thereon. The wood I propose...