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I have at Last found Leisure to peruse & consider the papers you left with me for my Opinion on the nature of your Interest in your Fairfax Lands. The deed of Settlement made by your Father on your brother Lawrence is long & complicated occasioned chiefly by an Intention to provide against the contingincie of the Prince Wm Lands which were the Subject of that deed & the Westmorland Lands...
I have your favr by Mr Manly, who I think has a very good right to the 2400 acres of Land called Hallows’s Marsh, but must bring a writ of right, being barr’d of an Ejectment, For which he is luckily just within time, & I shall order it out immediately, I forget whether I spoke to Mr Mason or not, & therefore he says he will write to him immediately. I left your papers with Mr Attorney in May,...
I will pay you the Sum of Four hundred pounds which my Nephew Informs me he is to give you for the Land he purchased of you in Frederick. I am Dr Sir Yr Mo. Obedt Humble Servt ALS , DLC:GW . In January 1772 Philip Pendleton bought in Frederick County for £400 what GW describes as “a piece of about 180 Acres of Land sold him—joining my other Land, his own Land, & the Land of the Haynes’s” (...
ON serious Consideration of the present State of our Practice in the General Court, we find it can no longer be continued on the same Terms. The Fees allowed by Law , if regularly paid, would barely compensate our incessant Labours, reimburse our Expenses, and the Losses incurred by Neglect of our private Affairs; yet even these Rewards, confessedly moderate, are withheld from us, in a great...
I received yr Favr & am very glad you have made the purchase of Mr Black. I am Possessed of none of the title Deeds, probably Colo. Brooke may to whom I immediately wrote & desired him, if he had, to forward them to Colo. Bassetts For you, or to Wmsburg to Mr Wythe, but have since heard he was not come home two days agoe. I imagine part of the conveyances are in the Secretary’s Office, & the...
Mr Valentine Crawford and Mr John Neavill have given bonds to Mr Benjamin Temple for £400. for Lands sold them on the Ohio, in which a brother of mine is Interested—the remote Situation of those Gentn makes it difficult to know how to come at the money, and they think your Connection with that Countrey, & particularly with Mr Crawford will enable you to serve them in it, as they would be happy...
I have procured a Copy of Dr Savage’s Bill Which I now inclose you with the other papers, as I imagine Yr Answer may be drawn above with more convenience to you. As to the Release he sets up, ’twil be necessary to set forth where it was made by your consents, or on her privy examination in Court, so far as you are acquainted wth the Facts. it will be time enough to have the Answer agt October,...
The continued sitting of Congress prevents us from attending our colony Convention: but, directed by a sense of duty, we transmit to the Convention such determinations of the Congress as they have directed to be made public. The papers speak for themselves, and require no comment from us. A petition to the king is already sent away, earnestly entreating the royal interposition to prevent the...
My friend Mr George Baylor will be the bearer of this, who has caught such a Military Ardor as to travel to the Camp For instruction in that Art, I beg leave to recommend him to your Countenance & Favor, not only on Account of his worthy Father, but from my Opinion of his own Merit. He is a Lieutent in our independant Company & has gained great Applause there by his diligent Attention to the...
Former labours in Various Public emploiements now appear as recreations compared with the present, which affords a scanty allowance for food and sleep; I mention this as an Appology to you and my other freinds for not having wrote more frequently. The Committee having now Adjourned for a fortnight, I am at home and mean to write for Next Post as I set out on a small mountain excursion...
Edmd. Pendleton to Thos. Jefferson , Esqe. I am conscious of a large Arrears of debt to you for favor received before you left Congress in the Winter, but your return to Virga. and my continued hopes of the pleasure of seing you, postponed my writing ’til I heard you had resumed your charge in Congress and I will now endeavor to pay some of the debt. I am sorry to hear your pleasure at home...
I am much obliged by the intelligence inclosed in your favor of the 21st . All the circumstances which have occurred in America, seem to confirm the Account, as Cornwallis is said to be arrived at Cape Fear, and his troops from 3 to 4000. We must defend our selves as well as we can. I am concerned to find there is danger of disunion at such a crisis, as that only can give Success to our...
The confusion which hath for some time happened amongst the People in the disputed Lands between Pennsylvania and this Colony, and a Representation to the Convention, that a Civil War, was like to be the consequence if something was not done to prevent it, Induced that Body to take the Subject into consideration, who were sorry to discover that a Jealousy seemed to prevail in the Governing...
I cannot take leave of the duty of writing Official Letters, now transferred to the Governor and Council, without giving you some free thoughts on two Subjects depending before Congress, both of them of importance to this Countrey, I mean the Pensylvania boundary, and the Petition of some factious people on the Ohio to be made a Separate Government. On the first of these You had formerly a...
Ere this reaches you, you’l have been furnished with all Our doings of importance at the last Convention, Our Mode of Government and the several Elections to Offices. I expected you had in the Preamble to our form of Government, exhausted the Subject of complaint against Geo. 3d. and was at a loss to discover what the Congress would do for one to their Declaration of Independance without...
I set down to continue my correspondence, tho’ have nothing to communicate worthy so much of your time as the reading will require. We have nothing from the Southward, at least that has reached Us, since Genl. Lee’s Letter to me. Dunmores Squadron were Pirating up Potowmack last week. I am not informed of any particular damage they did, except to Mr. William Brent of Stafford, in burning his...
I have [been] beating my brain about your old Opinion that our Land tenure should be merely Allodial, and a New Opinion frequently mentioned during the last convention, that the unappropriated Lands should all be sold for the benefit of the commonwealth; and it was thrown out, that Congress had some thoughts of taking up this business as a Continental Fund. As to this Last I hope No such Idea...
Your Esteemed Favor of July 29th . I received with Dr. Price’s Judicious Pamphlet which I had before received from my friend Braxton and read with great pleasure, and tho’ late, I beleive it will produce benefit to the cause in removing by his clear and explicit reasoning, all scruples which may remain in the minds of Our people. I am also obliged by your Original Declaration of Independance,...
Having been abroad for some time accompanying Mrs. Pendleton on a Visit to a sick Parent, I find my self Indebted for two of your favors of the 5th and 13th. As to the Allodial System respecting Our Lands, I confess since former conversations with you on the Subject and your late hint, I have thought a good deal on the Subject and still think, that the inconveniencies attending any mode I can...
It gave me infinite pleasure to hear by my Worthy Friend Woodford that you was in fine health, a circumstance the more pleasing, as it could scarcely have been expected, after such uncommon & unremitted toil For near three years. I am not Superstitious, nor disposed to offend you by what I know you abhor, yet it is firmly my creed that Heaven has raised & will preserve you For the Sake of the...
I thank you for yr esteemed favr of Octr 12th lately come to hand & assure you that in laying by my former letters ’til you could tel me you was in health, without interfering with more important Objects, (than my letters I mean, not yr health,) you did with them as I wished, and the hope of that alone induced me to write. I am under great Obligations by your Attention to Majr Taylor & feel...
The difficulty of conveying letters across the Countrey and some hopes of seing you in the City the first of April, are but poor, and yet they are the only Palliatives I can offer, for having so long delayed Acknowledging the receipt of your favor of Decemr. 18th. I immediately wrote to our friend W. to be informed if any thing had happen’d, or passed between you and him, which made it...
I have had the Hon r . to acknowledge the receipt of each of y r . very obliging Fav rs . by return of Post, neither of which I presume had reached you when your last of the 14 th . was written, but will hereafter regularly find their way. I am just return’d from attending our High Court of Chancary, where we found little business, people appearing more inclined to hunt the Sources of money,...
As I conjectured so it happen’d that your esteem’d Fav r . of the 21 st . past made a visit to Williamsburg & found me on it’s return, your next I suppose is now on the same route, as it is not yet come to hand. I beleive Count D’Estang amongst the beneficial things he has done for America in General, has effected a most important purpose for Virginia, in stopping a larger embarkation from...
Tr ( LC : Force Transcripts). Although the originals of this letter and, with few exceptions, the more than one hundred others which Pendleton wrote to JM are probably no longer extant, three partial collections (of which at least one is independent of the other two) are available. About 1890, Frederick B. McGuire of Washington, D.C., who had in his possession a considerable portion of...
Tr ( LC : Force Transcripts). I am made very happy by yr obliging favr of the 12th promising to indulge me in the desireable correspondence; since I requested it I have been informed you have ill health, I cordially wish its speedy restitution, but intreat you’l not Injure it by devoting to me too much of that small portion of time which health as well as vigor of mind requires should be...
Tr ( LC : Force Transcripts). Since my last I have yr favr of the 19th & can’t conceive where the great Fleet of our Allies are? they must have left the Windward Islands, & Rodney have been deceived by them if they did not come to America, As he would not otherwise have ventured to leave those seas: We hear nothing further of them to the Southward. I hope they are not in a state of such...
Tr ( LC : Force Transcripts). I have yr obliging favr of the 26th past, I know not when my first letter, after you kindly accepted my proposed correspondence, should have reached you, but be assured I have not miss’d a week since, nor shall I unless sickness prevents me, being a very Punctual tho’ not an entertaining correspondent; at this time I have not a word of foreign or domestic...
Tr ( LC : Force Transcripts). I am anxious to hear from you, since missing that pleasure last week, I fear the General sickness of the Citizens has reached you. I shall be happy to learn it proceed from any other cause. The story we have of Gen. Arnold’s corruption is indeed shocking to humanity & I wish much to know the utmost consequences of the discovery, as far as they are manifest &...
Tr ( LC : Force Transcripts). Since my last I have not only received yr favr. of the 10th but that of the 3d, when I supposed you had not written, also reached me after a Circuitous trip to Richmond, & removed my fears for yr want of health. I have no particulars of the Affair at Charlotte, mentioned in my former, but its authenticity seems confirm’d, & as our recruits are March’d that way, I...