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Finding that the gallows would not shut down on the Ink holders I therefore cut some of it away, and a jointed piece which I suppose you had made to rest the pens on, was liable to fall and cause a derangement of machinery, to prevent such an accident I have put a piece of spring to keep it up untill wanted—a very little work put the parralels in order, and the supporting springs shortened, or...
I have made all the haste I could to get your pens for your Polygraph, for I well know the uses of that machine, as it has long been my practice to keep copies of letters, because I have desired to leave to my family as full a knowledge of my transactions as possible, consistent with my other labours—but that you may know why I have been more solicitous on this score, know that after the death...
When I received your Polygraph, I repaired the springs, then made an essay to write with it, found it stiff—but on putting oil to all the joints, it preformed much better. so that my conclusion was that you neglected to give it oil occasionally. My next opperation was to take the parralells apart in order to examine all the joints—and it does not appear to have worn the pin-holes, indeed I...
It has for some time past that I have promised myself the pleasure of paying you a Visit, yet the situation of my family and the interests of the Museum has not allowed me that indulgence. My Son Titian has not only great skill in preserving all kinds of Animals, but also he has acquired an abundance of knowledge in Natural history, I mean of animated nature. And my Son Franklin is possessed...
It was my intention to have paid you a visit when I left Philad a I had proposed to myself to commence this journey in the first of May as the better season, but my youngest son Titian was so much indisposed that he could not attend to the business of the Museum, and another call for his improvement now obliges me to return to Philadelphia. A gentleman from England by the name of Cha s...
Although it is a long time since I have wrote, yet be assured that I very often think on the favors you have confered on me at various periods, and could I have been so fortunate as to think I could add a moment of pleas ure to you. I should have embraced the occasion, But absorbed in the various labours of the Museum, the attentions of duty to a large family, that look to me for aid on every...
Herewith I send your silver springs for your Pollygraph according to my promise in my last letter, I do not know whether they are of the proper length, but I know your talents to render them what they ought to be. By the public papers I find the accident you meet with in a fall, I hope by this time that a cure is made of your arm. and, I have read with pleasure your letter to M r Adams in...
Your favor of the 22 d instant I received yesterday, and devolving in my mind what I could best do to serve you , determined to take the springs from my traveling Poligraph, made of Brass wire, which perhaps are better than those made of Silver, unless the silver should have considerable of Alloy, and the wire drawn very hard. I believe I have some of the Wire left of which your springs are...
Yours of 28 th Ulto. received, yesterday, and coming home last night I thought of my small Polygraph, which was made for a traveling conveniency, I find one exactly what you want. therefore it gives me pleasure to send them. I have long thought on the means to preserve health, and have made many experiments to ascertain what would be the best food, as well as drink—and as I enjoy perfect...
In the hope, my dear Sir, of giving you some little amusement on what I conceive an interesting subject, which my Son Rembrandt. has very nealy completed for the Public Eye, Therefore I have made a Sketch of his Picture, enclosed, and trouble you once more with my address. and a description of “ Peal’s great Moral Picture the Court of Death ,” Thom Porter’s Poem on Death. The under figures...
Long oppressed under duty, respect and friendship, in having omited to write to you about the Plow which you so obligingly sent me. The principle on which the form is given is undoubtably excellent, as the action is by strait lines, yet without a proper length is given to the mould board, all its advantages are lost. I made repeated tryals of this Plow by an expert farmer at home, and also...
on the receipt of your letter I hastened to the City to seek the Inkstand you wanted, I beleive no nearer to your direction could be had in the City, than I have sent, I put two of them in one package and delivered it at the Post office, directed to you at Monticello. That most likely to answer probably may be sunk deeper by cutting out some of the wood beneath, and a little grinding down of...
soon after my arrival here I wrote to inform you of my object in visiting this place, with the hope that my scribling might not be a burden on your precious moments, and as I had said that I would give you some account of my Portraits, Since I begin to think I shall paint only one or two more at the present time, I will enumerate them. Viz t The President , M r Calhoun , M r Adams , M r Crawford ,
Some time past I meet with a gentleman in the Museum who informed me of your extreme indisposition, and from his account of your complaints, I dispaired of ever writing to you another letter, while painting the Presidents Portrait I received the pleasing intelligence of your restored health. Your emminant Labours for the good of mankind will endear your memory to future ages. I will give a...
I sensibly feel for your privations and sufferings, and hope and beg that my corrispondance may not add to affections, therefore let me intreat you, not to write to me, unless you think I can render you some service, in which case, I wish to receive your commands, and assure you that any thing in my power to perform will be executed with pleasure. It might not be necessary to write this, since...
there is very little probability that I can give you any information on what may be termed improvements made in Europe , your acquaintance with learned men in every quarter of the World, and your exalted knowledge of Science and arts in every department, and with all your fondness for the promotion of all useful discoveries that promise any benefit to mankind, I believe never escape your...
Although very unwilling to give you the least trouble in the epistolary line, yet I feel a desire to communicate what I consider a cricis of my labours on the Museum —beleiving that you esteem it a work of importance to the enlightning of the Public mind. Envy of some men and self-interest in others have made them active, to get the Museum remooved from the State-House , and the City being...
In several visits I made to Philad a after receiving your statement concerning young M c elhany, my inquiries about him was fruitless, at last I meet with him at a Watch -makers who had promised me notice when he should be found in the City. M r M c elhany seemed much confused when he spoke to me, on my asking him why he did not call on you before he left Charlotteville —he told me that he...
Calling on a Watchmaker to day, he told me of a young man who is an excellent artist, that is now in Virginia , I do not recollect at what place, but I believe I was told at Petersburgh , that he did not like the place—I then waited on his brother son of M c M r M c ilhany —who has promised me to write by tomorrows post to his brother and request him to call on you at Monticella
Last evening I received your letter of the 17 th Instant, and I suppose before this time you have received one from me dated the 9 th & 13 th in which I stated that the young man I had spoken to, had gone to the neighbourhood of Bethlehem —I have been with several Watch-makers in the City since I wrote, who all have promised me notice if any discreet young man offers—within two days I shall...
some time past I thought that I had found a young man in the Watch making line, that would have gone to settle as you proposed, but I have since heard that he has gone towards Bethlehem —and I have requested several Watch makers in the City to make inquiries for me by which means I shall have a chance of hearing if any young Man can be found suitable to recommend to your notice, I have...
By my inquiries amongst the Watch-makers in the City, I have found a young man of good Character, just out of the His apprentiship, who seems disposed to go into Virginia , I have read to him, the contents of your letter on that subject—and I have left some him time to make up his mind, probably he will give me his Answer, when I go into the City ; a few days hence—and then I will write again...
MS ( DLC: TJ Papers , 207:36935–6); entirely in Peale’s hand; undated.
It is my wish to communicate to you whatever I think has a chance of being novel and interresting. I have just seen a Machine for sowing grain in drills, of the most simple construction of any I have seen before— A mechanic was making it from one which he had seen at Doct r Logans lately brought from England . Like the Perambulator it has a Wheel and a handle to push it along. but as I mean to...
Since my last to you I have conversed with a few friends on the disposial of the Museum, M r Vaughan thinks that by a Tontine it might be sold most readily, the high interest it would give in a few years he considers a temptation to subscribers—I never relished the Idea of the gain by the death of others— And most probably I shall apply to the Legislature to obtain an act to dispose of it by a...
Your favor of the March 21 st came in due time— and a rainy day now gives me leasure to write, to thank you for your interresting letter, abounding with useful information to the farmer and Mechannic. You observe that the winter has been hard.—the Spring appears to be backward, I hope it will be favorable to our fruits, the last year gave us but li t tle. My small green House accidently...
When we beleive that we have made any discovery that offers somthing for the benefit of man, no time should be lost to communicate it to our friends, that they may give it to others if the communication will of be of any importance. some time past I had a well dug in a situation to give Water to my Cattle &c The Ingenious Isaih Lukens made me a small brass cylender and Boxes to form a pump and...
It is long indeed since I have intended to answer your letter of April 17. , at first I wished to finish my Corn-fields according to your directions, and after that I wanted to hear the observations of my Neighbours—and I must say that every one with whom I have conversed acknowledge the improvment of making hilly ground equally advantagous as level fields. your letter came to me at the proper...
A rainey day, this you think should be a day of leisure with a farmer, such and sundays for letter writing—but I contrive to have the first, a busy days, with my men; to make posts for fencing; handles for spades shovels and hoes; also plaining boards and other carpenters work, besides making and mending different sorts of harness. besides my attention to this, I have occasionally watch work &...
In a former letter I stated to you my folly in attempting to eradicate weeds from my farm by cuting them down with a briar-hook, by which exertion I had almost lamed my right arm—by using it only in light work ef the effects at last are almost whooly removed, and I have learned that the best mode to free land from weeds, is to plow late in the fall and early in the spring; to manure and sow...